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Thread: pro surfers

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by brewengineer View Post
    I do feel that our schools are too easy. They should encourage more parental interaction and add more challenges.
    Two really good points... schools DO need to challenge students. They also need to challenge teachers, community leaders, local employers, and perhaps most of all, PARENTS. There's a lot more to education than schooling.

  2. #32
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    Not to morph this into a discussion on schools... surfing is so much more fun to talk about!

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by archy View Post
    I like what I do for a living. I wake up in the morning sometimes excited to go to work. Whould I rather get paid to surf, of course. Stink bug said it right Pro surfing just like any other professional athlete is a fantasy land job.
    Without trying to assume or interpret what you mean by that, I'll just ask, what do you mean?

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by brewengineer View Post
    We also don't pay our teachers enough for the service they provide.
    That is correct and what's also a fact is that most states have far too lax standards for entry into the teaching profession. It's definitely not for everyone and too many get into it because of the union backing, benefits and quality pay not to mention the summer vacation. Teachers and other service jobs are "callings" that are meant for those who will fully respect the impact they have on the lives of others each day they're on the job.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    Real job = for most people, being miserable doing something you don't necessarily love or even like, but do it because it pays the bills. By this definition pro surfing is not a "real job", BUT, I would give up my "real job" to be a pro surfer any day of the week. They get to do what they LOVE to do every single day, and get paid for it. That to me is REAL, and the way it should be when we consider what a "real job" is.

    We are limited by our own thought process, we have been programmed to believe that going to school, getting a "good job" and working for a living is what it's all about, but to those who have been lucky enough or those who have worked hard enough to get paid doing something that they love like surfing have it figured out, not the other way around.

    Do you really love programming computers for a living? Do you love digging ditches? Do you love selling that widget? Do you love serving that customer? Do you love your little two week vacation, your 401k, your staff meetings, your annual review, or your 30 minute - 1hr lunch break??? Or would you rather be catching waves and cashing checks? Do you really love clocking in at 8:30am and clocking out at 5:30pm? I know I don't, i'd much prefer to clock in when my toes touch salt water and clock out when they return to the sand....
    SUPrise - lots of truths in here. I do have to mention that the pro surfer's "job" hardly starts when they enter and leave the water. We all know those who were born with gifts but being the best at anything in the world isn't a lottery and in no way happens by accident. 24/7/365. Those are the hours and days of work for nearly all who are in the top one-tenth of one percent of anything in the world. Even for obscure skills, specialties, and talents, there are a lot of people out there competing for the top and cream doesn't rise if its thin and dilute.

    Are there pro surfers out there that party their balls off and are less committed than others? Yes. And those individuals won't be on the tour for long. They also were the grommiest groms for years having an insatiable appetite for escalation in the sport to come close to reaching the tour.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    That is correct and what's also a fact is that most states have far too lax standards for entry into the teaching profession. It's definitely not for everyone and too many get into it because of the union backing, benefits and quality pay not to mention the summer vacation. Teachers and other service jobs are "callings" that are meant for those who will fully respect the impact they have on the lives of others each day they're on the job.
    The problem goes way beyond subpar standards for teachers though. I can't speak for other regions besides the northeast, but it's a major societal problem IMO...all of the new teachers I taught with were talented, motivated(at first), knew their subjects, etc. In my case the school we were in got the best of us. One thing I do think in terms of on the teaching end of things is that teachers should be getting their masters degree in the subject they teach, not education. Hate to say it, but the education classes I took were jokes.

  7. #37
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    It seems, by the sheer number of them, Surfing Schools are very profitable for the "teachers." $65/student for two hour group lessons is what I think most are charging around here.

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by seldom seen View Post
    The problem goes way beyond subpar standards for teachers though. I can't speak for other regions besides the northeast, but it's a major societal problem IMO...all of the new teachers I taught with were talented, motivated(at first), knew their subjects, etc. In my case the school we were in got the best of us. One thing I do think in terms of on the teaching end of things is that teachers should be getting their masters degree in the subject they teach, not education. Hate to say it, but the education classes I took were jokes.
    It sounds like we'd have similar thoughts on all of this. If you're hinting at complacency of veteran teachers after they get last the 10, 15, and 20 year marks then, yes, the level of gratitude and resulting motivation can typically have an inverse relationship with time in the field. Before long, all they're thinking about is the end of the day or year. After that, they just count down the years until retirement and pension of 80% annual of last salary. You're right on with specialty training as well. That becomes more important as you go higher in ages of children being taught. Elementary educators need to be all-purpose educators and caretakers of sorts because of the basic life skills that are part of the curriculum. Just like you wouldn't want a math-illiterate teacher running a high school calculus classroom, it wouldn't benefit younger students in grades 1-5 to be taught by a high school foreign language scholar. Then you'd have children like Bill Cosby's Nephew shatting their underoos and later in life shatting their wetty when they should instead be shotting piers.

    Now...Veronica Vaughn should be allowed to teach anything she damn well pleases. Especially non-credit community college courses that I'd have perfect attendance in.

    The main issue is a shortage of quality mentors for students in general, not just ones able to be placed in developmentally appropriate settings. I say we start with tightening the reigns on licensing for parents then we can put the clamp down on Mrs. Crabapple.

  9. #39
    Pro Surfers deserve everything they get out of it. Most don't make too much $, but just making a living out of a passion is great... As far as what they do make... A few make a lot, a bunch do OK and a lot need to have other jobs.
    I laugh when people say athletes are "over paid." If you are the best in the world at what you do AND what you do generates money, you deserve to get paid a lot. That goes for athletes and every other profession.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    Don't you think that's a little shortsighted? If I had to put a number on it, I'd guess that about 99.99% of today's most talented, innovative, inventors and creators were educated in public schools. But people still find a way to blame the education system for everything...
    no I don't. the public educational system has changed a lot in the past decade alone, especially with 'no child left behind'. granted there are exceptions coming out of our public schools. as far as 99.99% I would have to disagree.

    use pro surfing as an analogy. most up and coming pros come from well to do families who push/support their children to become a pro surfer. traveling the world on the QS and making a name for yourself takes more than talent. it takes easily $50,000/ year if not more. unless you are exceptionally talented, most sponsors are not going to front the bill. the rest comes from family support.

    and so if someone comes out of the public school system and becomes a brilliant inventor etc. it took a lot more than from what they learned in school. there is a big difference in curriculums between low income communities and middle class/affluent community schools. not to many doctors or lawyers come from low income schools. they are not given those opportunities. but overall the system is designed to prepare children to become an integral part of the machine. not to think outside the box and to think that their possibilitiesare limitless.

    these may be isolated instances, but I think it speaks volumes of the current educational system in the majority of US public schools.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ohbtQoEzr5o

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LZWyczXbhk

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBSgchJe2Z0

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGSWZjCyHUk