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  1. #11
    technology can absolutely change industries and businesses. for example, Kodak was not convinced that digital photography could overtake the quality and demand within that industry, and they ignored it. Well, not they are too far behind the game and barely hanging on. There is a chance that 3d printing could save producers so much money, while maintaining a high quality shape/material/etc., that the reflection to consumer savings takes over the industry. If I could buy a really nice board, like a gsi, but at an even greater discount (brand new for $300) I'd buy one.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    114
    It may get pushed aside, but I don't think the craft of hand shaping will die. I agree with Brewengineer that there will always be a niche market of people who like to have something hand made. If anything, skilled shapers will probably be able to charge hefty sums for increasingly rare hand-shaped boards. Look at guitars, for example.

  3. #13
    yeah I agree, because theres still a market for old/traditional film and cameras...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    265
    3 d printers are the future. It's everywhere now. Cars, dentistry, surfboards etc. I know a guy who sells them and there isn't many people selling them. Pros will still work with their shaper to get what they need. Remember they are Pro's. They can surf anything they stand on. They prefer their own shapes to make their life as easy as possible in the competing world. Look at their quivers it's huge. What they don't like usually goes to friends families or given away to autumn off for some charity.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    At my Jetty
    Posts
    1,273
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    2
    They are making printed working AR-15's now...google it...amazing

  6. #16
    just the lower receiver, yea?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    748
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    3
    I read an article in surfer about it. They are not quite to boards yet. The fins they are making are not as sturdy as they would like. It may be awhile. I would think the combo of foam and glass might cause some issues. Probably easier if it were just one material.

  8. #18
    Its definitely thinking outside the box! However, here's the problem....

    It may work with sailboards or kiteboards etc... but when it comes to surfboards one of the first things I learned when shaping is about the foam. There's a reason why Clark Foam was so sought after and why there's only a couple of companies out there that good shapers use.

    It actually has to do with the density of the foam and not just density but the spring factor. It sounds minut but really makes a huge difference! A soft or spongy foam makes for a crappy board! This is why good shapers haven't jumped on the whole eco thing or recyclable materials. Its because they just don't have the same spring or density as a good poly blank.

    So while there is all these great ideas and new technology coming about no one has yet come up with a comparable "Clark" blank!

    I'm open though to try it all!

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    UGHHH! :(
    Posts
    310
    It would be great to print out a fin plug if you accidentally break one.

  10. #20
    NOTHING will ever completely replace hand shaped hand crafted surfboards. They are works of arts, each unique in every way and tailored to each surfers technical needs. The HUMAN ELEMENT can never be relaced by computers as much as we try. Hand crafted surfboards are the way to go. Many of the top professional riders such as Dane Reynolds are even admitting that nothing rides like hand shaped boards.