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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Science mother****er
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    2,585
    Isn't this just the next step for the popout companies? I don't see this being any worse than what shapers already face today. There will still always be a market for hand-shaped boards. It is a cool concept that I would support for fin manufacturing.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,472
    Quote Originally Posted by brewengineer View Post
    There will still always be a market for hand-shaped boards.
    If this wasn't true, the existing tech would have put hand shapers out of business a long time ago. The potential value in it, as I see it, is taking a lot of the guesswork out of the design process. If you have good hard data to start with, rather than the rider's anecdotal description of what he may or may not actually be experiencing, you've got a better shot at nailing a good design for that particular person. However... the results are only as good as the data. So if all you're getting are basics... like length, width and "volume"... well, a good shaper has those dialed in already, and the tech isn't much help. But if you're taking about data that can detail things like length and depth of concave, length of hard edge and degree of tuck, location of rail apex... that can be very helpful.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lewes, DE
    Posts
    5,377
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    121
    Embrace technology or get lost in the dust.
    3d printers are becoming affordable, but the ink is still really expensive right now...

  4. #14
    technology can absolutely change industries and businesses. for example, Kodak was not convinced that digital photography could overtake the quality and demand within that industry, and they ignored it. Well, not they are too far behind the game and barely hanging on. There is a chance that 3d printing could save producers so much money, while maintaining a high quality shape/material/etc., that the reflection to consumer savings takes over the industry. If I could buy a really nice board, like a gsi, but at an even greater discount (brand new for $300) I'd buy one.

  5. #15
    It may get pushed aside, but I don't think the craft of hand shaping will die. I agree with Brewengineer that there will always be a niche market of people who like to have something hand made. If anything, skilled shapers will probably be able to charge hefty sums for increasingly rare hand-shaped boards. Look at guitars, for example.

  6. #16
    yeah I agree, because theres still a market for old/traditional film and cameras...

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Promontorium Tremendum
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    939
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    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    Embrace technology or get lost in the dust.
    3d printers are becoming affordable, but the ink is still really expensive right now...
    not for much longer:

    The key patents covering a 3D printing technique called "laser sintering" are set to expire in the next year or two -- there are a bunch of them, so they'll trickle out -- and this will radically reduce the price of printing and printers. Laser sintering involves melting a fine powder (usually plastic) in order to fuse it with the powder below and around it, and it's a technique that produces a very smooth, even finish. The big 3D printer manufacturers, who control the laser sintering patents, have used patent law to lock up the market for devices, and to prevent device-owners from sourcing their powder from third parties. As a result, simple, cheap plastic powder can cost more than filet mignon by weight, which means that the cost of 3D printed objects is very high -- especially when you factor in the extremely high cost (and high profit margins!) on the printers themselves.

    As these patents expire, it will mean that mass-manufactured printers from China and elsewhere will be able to integrate laser-sintering, setting aside the extruded plastic wire technique that is presently standard.
    from Boing Boing.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    248
    3 d printers are the future. It's everywhere now. Cars, dentistry, surfboards etc. I know a guy who sells them and there isn't many people selling them. Pros will still work with their shaper to get what they need. Remember they are Pro's. They can surf anything they stand on. They prefer their own shapes to make their life as easy as possible in the competing world. Look at their quivers it's huge. What they don't like usually goes to friends families or given away to autumn off for some charity.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    anywhere there is surf
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    659
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    2
    They are making printed working AR-15's now...google it...amazing

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    ethernet
    Posts
    2,435
    just the lower receiver, yea?