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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    476
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    3
    I read an article in surfer about it. They are not quite to boards yet. The fins they are making are not as sturdy as they would like. It may be awhile. I would think the combo of foam and glass might cause some issues. Probably easier if it were just one material.

  2. #22
    Its definitely thinking outside the box! However, here's the problem....

    It may work with sailboards or kiteboards etc... but when it comes to surfboards one of the first things I learned when shaping is about the foam. There's a reason why Clark Foam was so sought after and why there's only a couple of companies out there that good shapers use.

    It actually has to do with the density of the foam and not just density but the spring factor. It sounds minut but really makes a huge difference! A soft or spongy foam makes for a crappy board! This is why good shapers haven't jumped on the whole eco thing or recyclable materials. Its because they just don't have the same spring or density as a good poly blank.

    So while there is all these great ideas and new technology coming about no one has yet come up with a comparable "Clark" blank!

    I'm open though to try it all!

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    UGHHH! :(
    Posts
    314
    It would be great to print out a fin plug if you accidentally break one.

  4. #24
    NOTHING will ever completely replace hand shaped hand crafted surfboards. They are works of arts, each unique in every way and tailored to each surfers technical needs. The HUMAN ELEMENT can never be relaced by computers as much as we try. Hand crafted surfboards are the way to go. Many of the top professional riders such as Dane Reynolds are even admitting that nothing rides like hand shaped boards.

  5. #25
    Polar Opposites
    That's pretty crazy stuff. I think I might make boards the total opposite way. I guess there's more than one way to skin a cat. To each his own?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g7_R...e_gdata_player

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    If this wasn't true, the existing tech would have put hand shapers out of business a long time ago. The potential value in it, as I see it, is taking a lot of the guesswork out of the design process. If you have good hard data to start with, rather than the rider's anecdotal description of what he may or may not actually be experiencing, you've got a better shot at nailing a good design for that particular person. However... the results are only as good as the data. So if all you're getting are basics... like length, width and "volume"... well, a good shaper has those dialed in already, and the tech isn't much help. But if you're taking about data that can detail things like length and depth of concave, length of hard edge and degree of tuck, location of rail apex... that can be very helpful.
    Exactly. 3D printing will revolutionize many things, perhaps (though I doubt it) even surfboard manufacturing. But not in this incarnation. I do not see your cellphone collecting data that is precise enough to have anywhere near the effectiveness of a local shaper who has made and surfed many different shapes at your local spots.

    Put some sensors on the board, then we'll talk.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Slashdog View Post
    Exactly. 3D printing will revolutionize many things, perhaps (though I doubt it) even surfboard manufacturing. But not in this incarnation. I do not see your cellphone collecting data that is precise enough to have anywhere near the effectiveness of a local shaper who has made and surfed many different shapes at your local spots.

    Put some sensors on the board, then we'll talk.
    A good shaper most likely has the same mental ability of a good 3d modeler that creates shapes in 3d software using computer software.