LOGIN | REGISTER

Page 4 of 19 FirstFirst ... 2345614 ... LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 188
  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Charleston
    Posts
    1,349
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    Good, heavy racks will be your biggest step toward a decent result. Pass some time by building a good rack you can use to shape, and build T stands you can screw into them for glassing. You want them heavy... unless you're bolting them to the floor. This is good advice for a novices, hobbiests, and wannabes alike. Build 'em heavy, strong, with the right sized "yoke" and pad 'em up good.

    I wouldn't worry too much about lighting... you probably don't have the skills yet to fine tune anyway.

    Keep your shape simple... flat to vee bottom, use the natural rocker of the blank, and don't overshape (probably the number one newbie mistake).

    A hand saw, a mini trim plane, sanding block with one side padded, a surform, 60/80/100/150 grit paper, and a cheap electric planer... If you don't have one, I recommend the Bosch for a starter; affordable and decent.

    Use Epoxy... safer, slower, and no smell. You'll need all the "slower" you can get. Don't waste too much and you'll not have to spend much more than poly.

    For sanding, you'll want a variable speed sander/grinder/polisher type machine, but you can get away with a good orbital, or just get nice big Popeye arms and block it out by hand!

    Glass on your fins. No jigs, routers, etc. Tack 'em up and if they don't come out right, snap 'em off and try again.

    Also... consider taking the Brookdale class, if you're in the area. Four nights and you get your hands in there, building a board start to finish. Plus handouts and a design guide. Worth the investment, IMO.

    Lastly, listen to this guy.

  2. #32
    yes, LBCrew gave me some critical advice on my log. Turned out really well. For the guy who says it will turn out ****ty, that is just ignorant. You get out what you put in.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    Good, heavy racks will be your biggest step toward a decent result. Pass some time by building a good rack you can use to shape, and build T stands you can screw into them for glassing. You want them heavy... unless you're bolting them to the floor. This is good advice for a novices, hobbiests, and wannabes alike. Build 'em heavy, strong, with the right sized "yoke" and pad 'em up good.

    I wouldn't worry too much about lighting... you probably don't have the skills yet to fine tune anyway.

    Keep your shape simple... flat to vee bottom, use the natural rocker of the blank, and don't overshape (probably the number one newbie mistake).

    A hand saw, a mini trim plane, sanding block with one side padded, a surform, 60/80/100/150 grit paper, and a cheap electric planer... If you don't have one, I recommend the Bosch for a starter; affordable and decent.

    Use Epoxy... safer, slower, and no smell. You'll need all the "slower" you can get. Don't waste too much and you'll not have to spend much more than poly.

    For sanding, you'll want a variable speed sander/grinder/polisher type machine, but you can get away with a good orbital, or just get nice big Popeye arms and block it out by hand!

    Glass on your fins. No jigs, routers, etc. Tack 'em up and if they don't come out right, snap 'em off and try again.

    Also... consider taking the Brookdale class, if you're in the area. Four nights and you get your hands in there, building a board start to finish. Plus handouts and a design guide. Worth the investment, IMO.
    exactly. i'd still go for the 'better' lighting. it's so cheap and easy to set up.

    harbor freight has $30 planers. usblanks has the best close tolerance blanks out there.

    use resin research ce with fast hardener to lam. workable for an hour and 3hr till cure. the slow is too slow. 6hrs or something. the foam will suck too much resin. you'll get dry lam.

    take that class LBcrew suggests you'll at least know what your in for.

  4. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonSurf View Post
    BCN, this is the only time you've added any coolness to the forum. Congrats!

    Looks like Atlantico and other's may have tried and didn't knock it out of the park the first time and quit.... so what? I bet any board you make will float at least for a while. I just finished my second hollow wooden surfboard last night. It's easily 10x better than my first one. Next one will be better than that one.

    There's a stigma with surfing that if you're not riding the most highly tuned board with space age composites that the guy next to you is riding too, you're a kook wasting your time. That's cool if you want to pay attention to that. Do you ride in contests? Will you be riding this board in contests? Probably no to both questions. Just make one and let Atlantico fight with Emass, that's what they do best.

    If you're nervous about it, get a beat up longboard and chop it up into a mini or something. This mini craze going around is making all the weirdest boards look like the coolest ones.

    If you're off by a couple cm or even inches just tell the fool that mentions it you made an asymmetrical board to help you with your frontside air reverses.
    ?? fight with Emass? where do you get that?

    just trying to give dude advice. half my family works in production shops and i take working vacations out
    there all the time. hand shaped somewhere around 500-600 boards and laminated prob more then 2000 in my life. i grew up in surfboard factories. i know what im talking about here a little more then some guy on board #2.
    Last edited by AtanticO; Jul 22, 2013 at 05:01 PM.

  5. #35
    you're right, pro, if you can't do it perfectly on the first try, why even bother....

  6. #36
    Would you guys seriously advise against designing the board myself? I want to build something for VB waves. I've been sketching something along the lines of a 6'8 swallow tail quad with slight nose rocker and minimal tail rocker, but for my first board it's gonna be difficult to scale my drawings properly to create a successful outline template. All the guides online say to trace a board if it's your first build.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    you're right, pro, if you can't do it perfectly on the first try, why even bother....
    yes, if you can't even build proper racks then why bother. setup is the easiest part. if it's to much trouble or too hard to take an hour to build racks then how's he gonna shape a board? come on...really?

  8. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by AtanticO View Post
    yes, if you can't even build proper racks then why bother. setup is the easiest part. if it's to much trouble or too hard to take an hour to build racks then how's he gonna shape a board? come on...really?
    I'll build racks. Do you have any plans for building quick, garage friendly racks?

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Cosby's nephew View Post
    Would you guys seriously advise against designing the board myself? I want to build something for VB waves. I've been sketching something along the lines of a 6'8 swallow tail quad with slight nose rocker and minimal tail rocker, but for my first board it's gonna be difficult to scale my drawings properly to create a successful outline template. All the guides online say to trace a board if it's your first build.

    download the free version of aku shaper. you can design your outline, print it out and transfer it to a template. use thin masonite. this is the easiest thing you'll do. this way is much cleaner and more efficient. besides that... other then LBcrew...don't listen to the donkey's chiming in on here. go ask people on swaylocks if the internet is gonna be your guide. some of the dudes posting on there own glass shops, are legend shapers, etc and know whats up. SI has too many 'just learned to surf' dorks like clemsonSurf (from charlestown, SC?!?) and leethestud(nice name).
    Last edited by AtanticO; Jul 22, 2013 at 05:20 PM.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Cosby's nephew View Post
    I'll build racks. Do you have any plans for building quick, garage friendly racks?
    don't have clear pics of my old one's. but you can sorta see.... built these in 30min tops when i was waiting for steel bolt in racks. racks have to be connected and heavy as you can get them. build a base on the bottom out of 2x4's and put cinder blocks on it.
    Last edited by AtanticO; Jul 22, 2013 at 10:47 PM.