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Thread: SUPs conundrum

  1. #11
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    Yeah speak up and say something, they'll most likely leave. A lot of these wealthy, late to learn types have too much pride to apologize and are too self-conscious to keep trying.

    but be nice about it.
    Last edited by bassplayer; Jul 24, 2013 at 02:52 PM.

  2. #12
    most SUPers know they're frowned upon by every over type boarder and will be relatively considerate. yeah, there's the asshole in every crowd, but, on the average, I've found SUPers to be pretty mellow. If they're hogging all the waves, say something...they'll, more than likely, be amicable.

  3. #13
    Yeah - saying something is probably the best thing to do right now. I just see this getting to be a much bigger issue given the growth in SUPing. I fear the days it's closer to a 50/50 split in the water.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Dopio View Post
    Yeah - saying something is probably the best thing to do right now. I just see this getting to be a much bigger issue given the growth in SUPing. I fear the days it's closer to a 50/50 split in the water.
    idk, they stand so erect for so long, maybe word will get out that SUPing leads to back problems

  5. #15
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    Don't fear those days, it's trendy now, but I'm a believer in the idea that the ocean regulates itself...anybody who gets involved in riding waves(whatever the denomination) simply b/c of the trend will in time get their a$$ handed to them and go home w/ their tail b/t their legs.

  6. #16
    The move is to have one shortboarder sacrifice and sit too far out, making the sups go even further to the point where they cannot catch the waves. Take turns. Also if you paddle close to a sup they get nervous about falling over and move away, just casually move them out or off the peak. It will at least weed out the sups that a clueless. The rest are all good in my book.

  7. #17
    Only real solution is to call them out. If they are really a danger (not just if you don't like SUP's) than you should let them know. If nobody says anything they will continue.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dopio View Post
    I've read a decent amount of posts on this topic. Let me first say that I'm definitely not saying kill all the SUPers or that they don't belong in the water... more looking for answers and safety while in the water.

    I've found it increasingly dangerous at certain breaks - especially point-ish breaks with guys catching waves outside on these things. There is a line-up for short/fun boarders that are all in one spot respecting each other like a typical line-up.. then a set wave comes and 3 SUPers are charging right at the short-board line-up leaving guys scrambling to avoid them while either catching the wave or just plain trying to get out of the way. Often times the SUPers are in a way snaking the wave because they are dropping in at a point that is more towards the shoulder than the steeper inside shortboard take-off but are either going too fast to stop or view it as their wave since they been on it from the outside already.

    I see this problem just getting bigger as we see more SUPers by the day (now some life-long, never surfed guys appearing) and safety really being of concern on head high days.

    Would like to hear people's thoughts on how people deal with this at their local break and not just "move down the beach" because some breaks don't have that option.

  8. #18
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    As resident SUP guy and long time surfer I believe I can offer you some perspective on this issue. First, let me start by saying I'm 32 and started surfing when I was 15, on a 6'4" short board, but didn't get an SUP until just a few years ago (it was a B-Day gift). I had years of lineup experience when I was given this 12' beast but I knew right away that I was NOT taking her into the surf right away because I knew there were skills that needed to be learned before being able to effectively handle that size of a craft, stay standing 99% of the time, as well as deal with adding a paddle to the equation.

    What I did was paddle as much as I could on flat water until I felt extremely confident on it, I took about 6 months to do this, which may seem like a long time but I wasn't about to embarrass myself out there. Once I went into the surf I realized real quick how dangerous one of these could be (common sense told me this too). I only paddled into small waves at 1st and would take my prone surfboards out in anything over waist high for a while. I got the hang of it pretty quickly and ended up gradually riding waves up to HH to slightly OH, but I felt that it was more of a hassle than it's worth on big days and much preferred my smaller boards in such conditions. Now I'm looking into getting a much smaller / performance SUP because this bad boy just doesn't do it for me unless it's under head high and light winds. I have only surfed my SUP one time since getting my new 6'4" Coil for my last B Day present back in April (and I surf every week, sometimes 3-4 days/week), mostly because I'm having too much fun on the new stick and my LB.

    Having said all that, I've never once had an issue with my SUP being a danger to others, never ran into anybody, never dropped in on or snaked anybody, I find a peak to myself normally, but if others paddle out by me, I let others go and I wait till the coast is clear and then I take my wave, but when it gets crowded I'm usually out there letting others know if a set is coming, I hoot them into waves, and only take my fair share. If it gets too crowded and I feel like it's getting dicey, I'll move away or just paddle in and grab my LB or shorty.

    That's how I handle myself out there, but I do realize not everybody operates the same way. As irony would have it, my last session out I was almost ran over by an older guy (probably 50's) on an SUP. I was on my short board in a crowded lineup by a Jetty on a 3-4ft day, he was late to the party and showed up mid-day and paddled right into the mix (something I'd never do). Next thing I know as I'm popping up this guy comes from behind and within an inch of hitting me and snakes the wave. I was caught off guard and my reaction was to yell something to the effect of "WTF, you almost hit me" and he paddled back to say "that was a little close huh?" I said, "yeah, just a little bit there buddy" and then he stood there dumbfounded for a second and then realized I wasn't messing around and paddled off and didn't do it again. Did I handle it correctly? IDK probably not, I'm a bit of a hot head when people are d*cks, and I like to let them know that they are d*cks, but I got the desired result, which was for him to go somewhere else and be reckless.

    My advise to the OP or anybody else with a similar beef for SUP's is to take each situation on a case by case basis, just as you do any other short boarder or LB'er, witness how they handle themselves, and if they are a d*ck or just clueless out there then speak up and help educate them. It's not your job to teach someone etiquette I know but if you don't say anything, and nobody else says anything, then they will continue on being the d*ck they are. It's best to handle it without anger (I'm one to talk) so if you can do that without being confrontational then by all means be mature about it, but if it requires being assertive or aggressive to get the point across, then do what you have to do, just don't hurt anybody if you don't have to, that's all.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nateme16 View Post
    The move is to have one shortboarder sacrifice and sit too far out, making the sups go even further to the point where they cannot catch the waves. Take turns. Also if you paddle close to a sup they get nervous about falling over and move away, just casually move them out or off the peak. It will at least weed out the sups that a clueless. The rest are all good in my book.
    This makes alot of sense. It's always been survival of the fittest in challenging conditions. It's the clean lined up chest to slightly overhead days that create a conflict with traditional surfing and SUPing. If you can't reason with them ( its usually only one or two clueless offenders, most SUPers are kind, competent watermen/women) or outsmart them, someone needs to bring out a supersoaker loaded with veggie oil and spray them and their craft and their paddle down. I've seen it done with idiot jet skiiers and they learn fast to go down the beach when asked.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by waterbaby View Post
    idk, they stand so erect for so long, maybe word will get out that SUPing leads to back problems
    Actually it's quite the opposite, most guys who have back / neck problems from surfing end up switching to SUP and can extend their surfing life for several more years, which is why you tend to see a lot of older guys on them.