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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by yankee View Post
    Dear Lawd, now he's an expert. Please oh please just let him PM the poor kid.
    Do experts tell the audience to feel free to correct their statements? Why you got to try and derail a productive thread that is talking basics and therefore keeping future novices from getting your panties in a bunch asking the same questions?

    You buoys are never happy. You better call that urologist and ask him if the hormone replacement therapy you were put on a while back is estrogen instead of testosterone. If you thought low T levels made you feel like crap about yourself, that will seem like a dream come true compared to elevated levels of E.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Santa Barbara, CA/CT
    Posts
    336
    you do not belong in the water PERIOD

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by badon View Post
    thanks, good advice. definitely holding me back is the mental aspect of it, I have no problem as far as the physical part goes. i only go out when the waves are reasonable for my experience like you say. and i think what my problem is, i'm afraid to wipe out and be held under water by an oncoming set, that and maybe the being swept out to sea thing as dumb as it sounds.
    Listen man, I'm afraid of sharks. When I was younger, I would seriously have to force myself to paddle out on lonely dawn patrols. Once or twice, I even said "screw it" and just left the beach. Now, I have to just look back and laugh. Sharks are simply a part of surfing and they aren't going anywhere anytime soon. Equally so, there is always going to be the possibility that you get caught between sets. **** happens, dude. You just need to let go of this fear, beacuse there may come a day when you aren't able to surf and you're going to regret not paddling out.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    SWT is right on multiple levels. Pull-ups and rows are great for strengthening the lats and rhomboids which are key paddling muscles. There's a perfect exercise to do for paddling where you get a lat pulldown machine (or other cable machine; less pulleys the better as pulleys take away resistance), stand facing it, and with arms straight out having no elbow bend you push the bar down from shoulder level all the way to where the bar will hit your quads. Let the bar raise slowly and controlled on the way up (the "negative" portion of the movement) and maintain tension so the bar doesn't go much .
    Terrific ab/core exercise as well

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    A State of Confusion
    Posts
    1,495
    Quote Originally Posted by dlrouen View Post
    Listen man, I'm afraid of sharks. When I was younger, I would seriously have to force myself to paddle out on lonely dawn patrols. Once or twice, I even said "screw it" and just left the beach. Now, I have to just look back and laugh. Sharks are simply a part of surfing and they aren't going anywhere anytime soon. Equally so, there is always going to be the possibility that you get caught between sets. **** happens, dude. You just need to let go of this fear, beacuse there may come a day when you aren't able to surf and you're going to regret not paddling out.
    Yep, same experience I had when younger. Don't let your mind get the better of you out there.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    In a state of flux
    Posts
    3,097
    Quote Originally Posted by rcarter View Post
    Yep, same experience I had when younger. Don't let your mind get the better of you out there.
    ^^^this. if you can't do that then you probably should look for other activities.

  7. #17
    It still creeps me out to paddle out at dawn by myself. I still do it, but man it's a creepy feeling

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Singer Island
    Posts
    1,120
    Here are a couple of drills you can do on flat days to help you grow your comfort level underwater and during hold downs.

    1. This one simulates duck diving an endless set: Swim 10 strokes above water, then five underwater. Start out with three or four reps, and expand it to eight to twelve reps. This will help you expand your lung capacity and endurance. Warm up first with a decent swim of a couple hundred yards or so first, to get your heart rate up a bit before you go full on, then after wards do a couple hundred yards or so medium to low intensity to cool down.

    2. Alternate breathe as you swim freestyle. Try skipping not one breath, but three, then try skipping five, then go for breathing every seventh stroke. See many cycles you can go. If you get dizzy, stop. Layne Beachley used to do this in Hawaii to train for big wave hold down.

    Once you get comfortable underwater, you can relax through a thorough ass kicking and two wave hold downs, and will be much more confident and a better waterman.

  9. #19
    Make sure that whatever you do, you avoid hyperventilating while training in the ocean. Hyperventilation is extremely dangerous because it reduces the urge to breathe. It kills alot of competitive swimmers and free divers.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    3,754
    Fear is one of if not the most motivating emotions you can experience. You can use it for good or you can let it cripple your decision making. I find it's healthy to have some fears but to use them to motivate you to action, not inaction. When you finally decide that you are going to paddle out every time no matter what, and then follow through with this decision, it'll all be a memory of the past that you were once in fear of sitting in the lineup and paddling around in the deep water w/larger sets breaking around and on top of you. People say "know your limits", this is true, you should know them, but not let them stop you from achieving new ones. Start with 3-4 foot days, get use to that for a while. When you are 100% confident in those waves, bump it up a notch, and so on and so forth, don't bite off more than you can chew. Just remember it's suppose to be fun, so if you aren't having fun out there, time to go in.