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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New Jersey
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    449
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    25
    Yeah, I'm from Jersey, so winter time gets REALLY heavy. Completely different surfing in the wintertime. I've been taking these late drops and have been getting hucked over the falls far too many times though. I think it might have to break the bank and get some more volume and rocker for the chilly jersey barrels.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
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    4,494
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    Quote Originally Posted by 34thStreetSurfing View Post
    Yeah, I'm from Jersey, so winter time gets REALLY heavy. Completely different surfing in the wintertime. I've been taking these late drops and have been getting hucked over the falls far too many times though. I think it might have to break the bank and get some more volume and rocker for the chilly jersey barrels.
    While Jersey is known for some good winter surf, I would do the obvious thing and mirror my surfboard selection for the winter, based on your needs in the fall. I mean, Jersey is always getting publicity during cane season, so I would venture to guess that the waves in the fall overall outweigh the winter. So all rubber aside, the boards should go hand in hand for both seasons

  3. #13
    The average person weighs ~25 lbs more with a fully soaked wetsuit, boots and gloves on. You'd be surprised how much the exact same board with just an extra 1/8 of an inch thickness would make when paddling during the winter. Whether or not you want to spend the money to buy another board is a different question...

    Quote Originally Posted by newenglandflatness View Post
    That's conditions, man. I'm more speaking to the mentality of people who get "winter boards". If it's head high and barreling in the summer, I'm riding my HPSB. If it's head high and mushy in the summer, I'm riding my small wave board. If it's head high and barreling in the winter, I'm riding my HPSB. If it's head high and mushy in the winter, I'm riding my small wave board.

    If your question is more about only having one board, well yes, there are obvious advantages to having a bit of a quiver. Save up and get it done. But the whole "I'm wearing more rubber and thus heavier so I got a thicker/wider/longer board" mentality, is not something I find to hold that much water.

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by csburg View Post
    The average person weighs ~25 lbs more with a fully soaked wetsuit, boots and gloves on. You'd be surprised how much the exact same board with just an extra 1/8 of an inch thickness would make when paddling during the winter. Whether or not you want to spend the money to buy another board is a different question...
    25lb? you sure about that? i've weighed myself before in a wet 5/4 (no booties or gloves and was only 7lbs heavier. wetsuit companies put tons of air in those things now-a-days.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    New Jersey
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    449
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    25
    I heard around twenty too. And you gotta figure that when you're completely sealed up with gloves, boots, and hood, it keeps more water/weight in the suit.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by 34thStreetSurfing View Post
    I heard around twenty too. And you gotta figure that when you're completely sealed up with gloves, boots, and hood, it keeps more water/weight in the suit.
    so your suit weighs as much as 3-4 surfboards? i don't know who told you 20 or 25lbs but people say all kinds of cray things. hold something you know weighs 20 or 25lbs in one hand and your soaking wet wetsuit in the other and compare.

    either way, when its cold and the waves are good it's always nice to have a little more volume. just surfing in a wetsuit and wearing gloves wears you out quick.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Crystal Coast,N.C.
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    400
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    24
    Quote Originally Posted by Zman9398 View Post
    So today we had a nice swell in sj and I ended up only having a 6' 3" x 19 1/2 x 2 5/8 step up and it was fun but I felt like the board wasnt giving me any power.

    What difference would I get out of riding a regular shortboard in these conditions instead of riding the step up?

    What kind of feel would it have in comparison?


    Every ones different in the way they ride, where they position on the board and how aggressive they ride on the board. The board is only half of the equation. Back in the day most people only had one board to ride in all conditions period so you had to ride more or less aggressive for conditions at hand. You rode your short in weak summer as well as overhead barrels and changed the way you rode according to power of the wave. If you think you need a step up then get it custom made to be a more performance oriented board so you have the stability you might want but still have the ability to whip the board around. What the board will really accomplish ultimately depends on you though and how aggressive or not you push yourself. No matter what you ride or the conditions you are in, rippers will rip so be a better surfer no matter what you are riding.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    herd of cats, usa
    Posts
    173
    Quote Originally Posted by 34thStreetSurfing View Post
    I heard around twenty too. And you gotta figure that when you're completely sealed up with gloves, boots, and hood, it keeps more water/weight in the suit.
    Your board is too wide to ride barrels effectively. You need more rocker to stay in the face-your rails are too thick and if you catch one its gonna gain too much speed too early and spit you out into flats