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Thread: WTF Hurricanes

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonSurf View Post
    Here's a question for you coastal folks. How come so many of you were uninsured? Maybe you don't have mortgages?

    The only way anyone in my neck of the woods can get away without having wind & hail, flood, and general homeowners insurance is if you own your house. I think it's pretty naive, even with the freak storm like Sandy, to not protect your investments with some insurance.
    I live on the bay and have no mortgage. i self insure by having money put away in case. To repair my house from a flood its repair the floors, a four foot rip of the 1st floor walls, and landscaping. All of which i can do myself. I just need money for the material. We keep appliances and utilities high and everything else we move to the 2nd floor when the storm is on the way. Floods happen even without a storm here. You live here long enough you get used to it and deal. Hey I also don't have the best of everything. This is not the place for Wainscoting, a Subzero fridge, and a Viking Stove.
    Last edited by Peajay4060; Aug 19, 2013 at 02:25 PM.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by shark-hunter View Post
    Irregardless of being rich or not, we are overdeveloping our shoreline.
    So? Can you fault people for wanting to go to the beach? Whether it's to visit or to live, you're never going to stop development from supporting the crowds. You just have to accept the risks and hope for the best.

  3. #33
    irregardless is not a word jackhole. lol... some say it isn't. I like to use it though.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by shark-hunter View Post
    Yes that's true, but the majority of damage EVERY SINGLE year(sandy was a fluke) is to ocean front homes. That was the point I was trying to make. Every noreaster does damage in some area's to these homes.
    This is where you are wrong. On the surface it may appear that these houses take the brunt of the damage because they are closest to the ocean. Really though the majority of damage occurs on the back bays where the elevations are lower and there are no dunes for protection. It does not matter if its a hurricane, tropical storm or noreaster, these are the first areas to flood. And these are typically the more modest houses and bungalows that are not owned by millionaires but middle class folks.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by shark-hunter View Post
    Actually you're totally clueless and clearly biased. I'm generally liberal, but I'm guessing you're a right winger? Subsides are fine for oil companies and millionaires, but no "entitlements" for the underpaid poor right? That's usually the right wing mantra
    http://reason.com/archives/2012/10/2...ietly-approved
    Reminds me of people who build near a river that floods every 15 years and are shocked when the river floods their home and expect the government to reroute the river and spend millions protecting their house. Don't build by the river if you can't take the risk

    Yeah you know what...Material possessions are just that....Material! Thunderstorms damage homes all the time, yet I still enjoy watching them even though a branch might fall on my car/home. I enjoy meteorological phenomenon and I don't need to apologize to anyone for that. [B]I certainly don't hope for a landfall of a hurricane or for a wind gust from a thunderstorm to topple a tree onto someone's house though.</b> I like hurricanes to spin out in the Atlantic and send ground swell. Some of you guys are being ridiculous. It's life. It's nature. Maybe people who like hot weather shouldn't hope for hot weather because it kills more people than hurricanes. What about people who enjoy snow in the mountains. Should skiers in the rockies not hope for snow. There's avalanches. People slip and fall. It's called nature and it's life.

    Actually there is something you can do about over development in coastal area's. Buy people's home's when they get destroyed and don't let them rebuild rather than the current agenda of spending millions of dollars in insurance subsidies and sand replenishment. Reclassify coastal area's to be protected from future development as well.

    Hey buebonice
    If you don't enjoy hurricanes coming off the cape verde then I'm guessing you don't go out surfing anytime there's a hurricane swell right? What about a low pressure system swell? That also causes coastal property damage. So I expect to NOT see you out in the lineup right? So basically sw local wind swells only for you right?
    Please stop using the word surfing!!!! You ****ing boogieboard like 8 year olds.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfrr View Post
    This is where you are wrong. On the surface it may appear that these houses take the brunt of the damage because they are closest to the ocean. Really though the majority of damage occurs on the back bays where the elevations are lower and there are no dunes for protection. It does not matter if its a hurricane, tropical storm or noreaster, these are the first areas to flood. And these are typically the more modest houses and bungalows that are not owned by millionaires but middle class folks.
    Not so sure. The ocean front has more high velocity water.

  7. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by shark-hunter View Post
    I'm sure there are some rare exceptions(inherited wealth is still wealth of course!), but the majority of beachfront home owners are rich in nj.
    Oceanfront homes in NJ are generally worth over 1 million dollars.
    http://www.businessweek.com/articles...eanfront-homes
    Average price is 1.1 million.

    Some WAY more than that. A nurse or a teacher working full time couldn't dream of buying a home like that. Many people just own these as summer homes. There not even full time residences. Long island is even worse. Some of the homes in the hampton that are oceanfront go for like 30-50 millions. It's really kind of absurd and show the huge income inequality that exists.

    Irregardless of being rich or not, we are overdeveloping our shoreline.
    Reading facts on the internet, lol. Just roll through some of the coastal towns in NJ. There are plenty that are of towns comprised of blue working class people. Of course houses in areas like Spring Lake and Sea Girt which are 15 million bring up the value of the cheaper houses.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by barrels4liam View Post
    blue working class people. .
    You mean smurfs?

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by aka pumpmaster View Post
    Not so sure. The ocean front has more high velocity water.
    The bays flood a lot more than the ocean front around here. Take a combo of a super high tide, a strong wind in the right direction that won't let the tide recede, and heavy rain that can't drain out because of the high tide and the bay will flood. The ocean front gets structual damage from the wave surge. The bays just slowly, or sometimes not so slowly, fill up with water and crawl up the street and it doesn't take a direct hit from a storm to do it. It can happen sometimes even when a hurricane just passes by and gives us something to surf. The oceanfront town damage happens like Godzilla coming to town. the bay town damage is more like the Blob.
    Last edited by Peajay4060; Aug 19, 2013 at 03:24 PM.

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by seldom seen View Post
    You mean smurfs?
    I'm glad someone said it!

    On a more serious note, I'm all for people living as close as they want to the beachfront BUT not when the cost gets bucked to taxpayers like myself. One thing that I don't think has been mentioned yet is the issue of FEMA subsidizing insurance for flood prone areas. I think it was talked about in the Sandy thread though.

    I had to check my facts on Wikipedia but basically what happened in the 50s is that insurance companies stopped insuring homes on the coast and flood plains because they were losing money. Eventually, however, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) was created by the government to provide flood insurance for those in flood prone areas. The NFIP was supposed to be self-sufficient but they don’t charge the full rate they should because a lot of homeowners can’t afford it. They keep running up huge deficits and borrowing from the Treasury to keep solvent.

    So taxpayers pay for people, rich and poor, to be able to live on the coast. That’s the real issue. It doesn’t matter what size house you have. If you live on the coast you should be paying insurance based on the real costs and risks of living there.

    That is all.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationa...urance_Program