LOGIN | REGISTER

Page 5 of 8 FirstFirst ... 34567 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 77

Thread: WTF Hurricanes

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by seldom seen View Post
    You mean smurfs?
    lmao. Now, that was funny. blue collar is what I meant.

  2. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by pinkstink View Post
    I'm glad someone said it!

    On a more serious note, I'm all for people living as close as they want to the beachfront BUT not when the cost gets bucked to taxpayers like myself. One thing that I don't think has been mentioned yet is the issue of FEMA subsidizing insurance for flood prone areas. I think it was talked about in the Sandy thread though.

    I had to check my facts on Wikipedia but basically what happened in the 50s is that insurance companies stopped insuring homes on the coast and flood plains because they were losing money. Eventually, however, the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) was created by the government to provide flood insurance for those in flood prone areas. The NFIP was supposed to be self-sufficient but they donít charge the full rate they should because a lot of homeowners canít afford it. They keep running up huge deficits and borrowing from the Treasury to keep solvent.

    So taxpayers pay for people, rich and poor, to be able to live on the coast. Thatís the real issue. It doesnít matter what size house you have. If you live on the coast you should be paying insurance based on the real costs and risks of living there.

    That is all.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nationa...urance_Program
    I agree. I leave near the beach. I don't expect any handouts from FEMA and I'll pay for any damage myself. I accept the risk myself and taxpayers shouldn't pay for huge payouts to people who choose to live near the water.

  3. #43
    As surfer's, we all pray for hurricanes, but of course, not to make landfall and destroy people's homes. Sandy was a reminder to all of us how strong these storms can be when they make landfall, and show the results of living in coastal towns. Talk to the residents of the OBX about storms and flooding, it's an ongoing process of destroyed, rebuild down there.

    I agree with pumpmaster, when you live in a coastal town, you have to know the risks...it's like surfing, every time you paddle out, there are risks...you could get chopped in half by a hungry shark, fall face first onto the sandbar and break your neck...but with those risks comes rewards,

    What better reward than to be able to open your eyes from a good night sleep and see the ocean. I dream of making that a reality someday, whether it happens or not...I am still content to enjoy the ocean when my schedule permits.

    I realize that not wearing the shoe of a person who has lost everything they've worked for from a hurricane makes it hard to cultivate the feelings of not wanting storms, but, the storms are coming regardless of what we want. Mother Earth is in control. We are passengers along for the ride. Make the best of what she throws at us.

    And don't feel guilty for going out for a surf, life is too short and the only time that you are guaranteed is right now...keep the stoke!

  4. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by Koki Barrels View Post

    I agree with pumpmaster, when you live in a coastal town, you have to know the risks...it's like surfing, every time you paddle out, there are risks...you could get chopped in half by a hungry shark,
    There's basically near zero risk of that happening in the mid atlantic. You're not in South Africa. And shark attacks are risk that could be greatly reduced by netting beaches(proven to work) and fishing for sharks. And we are talking about lives here, not property. It's a different thing than hurricanes, which are a large scale climatic force.

  5. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by shark-hunter View Post
    There's basically near zero risk of that happening in the mid atlantic. You're not in South Africa. And shark attacks are risk that could be greatly reduced by netting beaches(proven to work) and fishing for sharks. And we are talking about lives here, not property. It's a different thing than hurricanes, which are a large scale climatic force.
    I guess you missed OSearch and tracking the Great Whites on the east coast. Mary Lee would rip any of us to shreds if she got hungry enough, brother...

  6. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Koki Barrels View Post
    I guess you missed OSearch and tracking the Great Whites on the east coast. Mary Lee would rip any of us to shreds if she got hungry enough, brother...
    You obviously haven't read my other posts! I'm perfectly aware of the white situation that's recently occured in cape cod(which isn't the mid atlantic) When was the last GW attack in nj?

  7. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by shark-hunter View Post
    You obviously haven't read my other posts! I'm perfectly aware of the white situation that's recently occured in cape cod(which isn't the mid atlantic) When was the last GW attack in nj?
    There doesn't have to be a last time, dude! All it takes is the first time.
    Shark-hunter, I don't have beef with you, man...but let's face it, the seal pop is shootin' through the roof, it's just a matter of time b4 you start hearing reports of people getting attacked by whites in your neck of the woods.

    Mary Lee was down by SC and swam all the way up to your parts, she's def swimming through the mid-Atlantic!

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Promontorium Tremendum
    Posts
    879
    Images
    1
    meanwhile, back to the season at hand:

    We've had five named storms so far in the Atlantic this year, which is more that average for this point in the season. Usually, the fifth named storm does not arrive until August 31. However, we are well behind average for the arrival of the season's first hurricane, which usually occurs by August 10. The season's second hurricane usually arrives by August 28. It is questionable if we will see the season's first hurricane by that date, given the current lack of activity, the dry air moving across the Tropical Atlantic, and the lack of model predictions for tropical storm formation this week. Still, I'm not willing to downgrade the seasonal forecasts for above-average activity yet, as we are still three weeks away from the usual September 10 peak in activity, and the Atlantic is capable of getting very active in a hurry.
    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/show.html

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    milton delaware
    Posts
    1,402
    Images
    262
    Quote Originally Posted by pinkstink View Post
    The NFIP was supposed to be self-sufficient but they don’t charge the full rate they should because a lot of homeowners can’t afford it. They keep running up huge deficits and borrowing from the Treasury to keep solvent.
    Or because congress keeps voting to reject rate increases that would make the program actuarial. Turns out people who live in flood prone area also vote.

  10. #50
    It's going to be really good in a couple weeks, boys....i can feel it

    “Our confidence for an above-normal season is still high because the predicted atmospheric and oceanic conditions that are favorable for storm development have materialized,”

    “Also, two of the four named storms to-date formed in the deep tropical Atlantic, which historically is an indicator of an active season.”

    http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/stories...aneupdate.html

    apologies for derailing a perfectly good thread...