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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,859

    Getting the most out of each wave

    So i'm getting to the point in my surfing where i'm trying to get more out of each wave. I'm in the intermediate skill level I believe and need some tips on getting to the next level. I have no issues catching waves that are HH and under, but i'd like to extend my rides a bit more and get more turns, snaps, cutbacks, floaters, etc., but more than anything I really want to get my rail game dialed in. "Power Surfing" is a term some use, I just really like big carving turns. I want to get higher on the face more often, and I want to capture more of the waves energy for speed.

    I know that a lot of what I can do has to do with the type of board i'm riding and what that type of board is designed for, so I don't want to try and fit a square peg in a round hole so-to-speak. I have several boards but the one i'm talking about currently is my 6'4" Coil Flashback Fish. It's 21.5" Wide x 2 3/4" thick but foiled nicely at the rails, with a slightly pulled in swallow tail, flat bottom w/slight V out the back and a decent amount of nose rocker for some steeper drops. I'm nowhere near maxing out the potential for this board, so some help in getting this thing humming would be appreciated. Think of a cross between a HPSB and Fish. This board is my stepping stone to a true HPSB, so keep that in mind when thinking of what it's designed for.

    As for bigger waves (HH-DOH), i'm able to catch them, but I'm not quite where I want to be, the largest I've caught on this thing is probably around 8ft, but with less regularity and less control. I want to make these days as consistent as the smaller days eventually. Most of this is mind set I realize and getting use to that size of a drop and throwing yourself over the ledge, but any tips are welcomed. Thanks.

  2. #2
    I hear ya. One thing I always noticed is the good power surfers spend little time way out on the shoulder unless they are trying to generate a lot of speed for an end section air. Draw an imaginary line perpendicular to the wave right where the lip is beginning to curl/crumble over. The apex of their bottom turns is usually in that area or slightly before it. So, they're hitting the steepest part of the wave and are able to utilize the maximum power that the wave provides. When they drop back down after hitting the lip they'll be in the perfect position to lean into another bottom turn and do it all over again. Link a bunch of these turns together and you've got a solid power surfing ride.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,859
    Quote Originally Posted by goosemagoo View Post
    I hear ya. One thing I always noticed is the good power surfers spend little time way out on the shoulder unless they are trying to generate a lot of speed for an end section air. Draw an imaginary line perpendicular to the wave right where the lip is beginning to curl/crumble over. The apex of their bottom turns is usually in that area or slightly before it. So, they're hitting the steepest part of the wave and are able to utilize the maximum power that the wave provides. When they drop back down after hitting the lip they'll be in the perfect position to lean into another bottom turn and do it all over again. Link a bunch of these turns together and you've got a solid power surfing ride.
    Thanks Goose, taking mental notes.

  4. #4
    it's not an equipment problem. That coil sounds rad. Shoot, if anything, leave it at home and get a crappy log. You will catch more waves and ultimately become a better surfer. It's all about being in the right place in the right time, or, rather, putting yourself there.

    Oh yeah, in central Fl I wouldn't worry too much about hh-doh... and if you are traveling you will quickly adjust. Big waves are easier, but maybe I just say that because I am lazy.
    Last edited by leethestud; Aug 20, 2013 at 09:50 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,859
    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    it's not an equipment problem. That coil sounds rad. Shoot, if anything, leave it at home and get a crappy log. You will catch more waves and ultimately become a better surfer. It's all about being in the right place in the right time, or, rather, putting yourself there.

    Oh yeah, in central Fl I wouldn't worry too much about hh-doh... and if you are traveling you will quickly adjust. Big waves are easier, but maybe I just say that because I am lazy.
    Thanks Lee, the equipment is definitely not the issue (it's all me for sure), I just want to work more in harmony with what my equipment is designed to do if you will.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    MD - VA
    Posts
    4,345

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    it's not an equipment problem. That coil sounds rad. Shoot, if anything, leave it at home and get a crappy log. You will catch more waves and ultimately become a better surfer. It's all about being in the right place in the right time, or, rather, putting yourself there.

    Oh yeah, in central Fl I wouldn't worry too much about hh-doh... and if you are traveling you will quickly adjust. Big waves are easier, but maybe I just say that because I am lazy.
    This, right here. (that thudding sound was lee hitting the floor as he reels in shock at my agreeing with something he wrote.....no worries, he's young, he'll recover)

    It's true, though. On the right coast, in summer, haul out the plank. Because the actual act of wave catching is the key to the ignition. Use the right equipment, practice angled takeoffs instead of the big swoop down the face where you outrun the wave & it 'dies' on you... (it didn't die on you, you're just out of position & too far off the shoulder), stay high on the wave whatever size it is & you've put yourself in the position to try some manoeuvers (sp).
    I'd just say one other thing: if you aren't crashing & burning on waves, then you're not trying anything to improve. Not a criticism at all; just the nature of any sport.

    Sounds like you're really on track to become a skilled surfer. And then? You can test drive for the gnome.
    Last edited by yankee; Aug 21, 2013 at 02:04 AM. Reason: couldn't resist the gnome thing

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by yankee View Post
    This, right here. (that thudding sound was lee hitting the floor as he reels in shock at my agreeing with something he wrote.....no worries, he's young, he'll recover)
    nah, we get along fine when surfing is actually the topic, rare an occasion that may be.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,859
    Quote Originally Posted by yankee View Post
    This, right here. (that thudding sound was lee hitting the floor as he reels in shock at my agreeing with something he wrote.....no worries, he's young, he'll recover)

    It's true, though. On the right coast, in summer, haul out the plank. Because the actual act of wave catching is the key to the ignition. Use the right equipment, practice angled takeoffs instead of the big swoop down the face where you outrun the wave & it 'dies' on you... (it didn't die on you, you're just out of position & too far off the shoulder), stay high on the wave whatever size it is & you've put yourself in the position to try some manoeuvers (sp).
    I'd just say one other thing: if you aren't crashing & burning on waves, then you're not trying anything to improve. Not a criticism at all; just the nature of any sport.

    Sounds like you're really on track to become a skilled surfer. And then? You can test drive for the gnome.
    Good stuff Yankee, I think you pretty much nailed it when it comes to out running the wave, staying in the pocket is what I need to improve on and the rest will probably come after that. Angled take offs are something I've been getting better at, but the bigger it gets the harder it seems to nail the take off on the angle, so sometimes I take the straight drop and try to make a solid bottom turn but it doesn't always work out, so that's something I'm going to focus on.

    Now all i need is an orange jump suit and white space helmet to do some test driving for my little gnome buddy

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    VA Beach
    Posts
    1,246
    Quote Originally Posted by yankee View Post
    ...practice angled takeoffs instead of the big swoop down the face where you outrun the wave & it 'dies' on you... (it didn't die on you, you're just out of position & too far off the shoulder), stay high on the wave whatever size it is & you've put yourself in the position to try some manoeuvers (sp).
    I'd just say one other thing: if you aren't crashing & burning on waves, then you're not trying anything to improve. Not a criticism at all; just the nature of any sport.
    I'm finding this advise very useful. Thanks.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Singer Island
    Posts
    1,631
    Try jumping off bridges, high dives and rock quarrys to get used to that feeling of hurling over the ledge. One split second of hesitation and you get lip launched. (Make sure you snorkel the water below the bridge first to make sure you are not landing on any submerged cars, etc). Also try big wave fins, such as Sunny Garcia FCS. They will give you bite on big bottom turns. Make sure you can hold your breath in case you eat it at the bottom, and get hit by the wave behind it as you come up. Here is a tip: Take off on the last wave of the set to avoid double wave beat downs. Have fun :-)