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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
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    4,448

    Getting the most out of each wave

    So i'm getting to the point in my surfing where i'm trying to get more out of each wave. I'm in the intermediate skill level I believe and need some tips on getting to the next level. I have no issues catching waves that are HH and under, but i'd like to extend my rides a bit more and get more turns, snaps, cutbacks, floaters, etc., but more than anything I really want to get my rail game dialed in. "Power Surfing" is a term some use, I just really like big carving turns. I want to get higher on the face more often, and I want to capture more of the waves energy for speed.

    I know that a lot of what I can do has to do with the type of board i'm riding and what that type of board is designed for, so I don't want to try and fit a square peg in a round hole so-to-speak. I have several boards but the one i'm talking about currently is my 6'4" Coil Flashback Fish. It's 21.5" Wide x 2 3/4" thick but foiled nicely at the rails, with a slightly pulled in swallow tail, flat bottom w/slight V out the back and a decent amount of nose rocker for some steeper drops. I'm nowhere near maxing out the potential for this board, so some help in getting this thing humming would be appreciated. Think of a cross between a HPSB and Fish. This board is my stepping stone to a true HPSB, so keep that in mind when thinking of what it's designed for.

    As for bigger waves (HH-DOH), i'm able to catch them, but I'm not quite where I want to be, the largest I've caught on this thing is probably around 8ft, but with less regularity and less control. I want to make these days as consistent as the smaller days eventually. Most of this is mind set I realize and getting use to that size of a drop and throwing yourself over the ledge, but any tips are welcomed. Thanks.

  2. #2
    I hear ya. One thing I always noticed is the good power surfers spend little time way out on the shoulder unless they are trying to generate a lot of speed for an end section air. Draw an imaginary line perpendicular to the wave right where the lip is beginning to curl/crumble over. The apex of their bottom turns is usually in that area or slightly before it. So, they're hitting the steepest part of the wave and are able to utilize the maximum power that the wave provides. When they drop back down after hitting the lip they'll be in the perfect position to lean into another bottom turn and do it all over again. Link a bunch of these turns together and you've got a solid power surfing ride.

  3. #3
    it's not an equipment problem. That coil sounds rad. Shoot, if anything, leave it at home and get a crappy log. You will catch more waves and ultimately become a better surfer. It's all about being in the right place in the right time, or, rather, putting yourself there.

    Oh yeah, in central Fl I wouldn't worry too much about hh-doh... and if you are traveling you will quickly adjust. Big waves are easier, but maybe I just say that because I am lazy.
    Last edited by leethestud; Aug 20, 2013 at 08:50 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,448
    Quote Originally Posted by goosemagoo View Post
    I hear ya. One thing I always noticed is the good power surfers spend little time way out on the shoulder unless they are trying to generate a lot of speed for an end section air. Draw an imaginary line perpendicular to the wave right where the lip is beginning to curl/crumble over. The apex of their bottom turns is usually in that area or slightly before it. So, they're hitting the steepest part of the wave and are able to utilize the maximum power that the wave provides. When they drop back down after hitting the lip they'll be in the perfect position to lean into another bottom turn and do it all over again. Link a bunch of these turns together and you've got a solid power surfing ride.
    Thanks Goose, taking mental notes.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Singer Island
    Posts
    1,416
    Try jumping off bridges, high dives and rock quarrys to get used to that feeling of hurling over the ledge. One split second of hesitation and you get lip launched. (Make sure you snorkel the water below the bridge first to make sure you are not landing on any submerged cars, etc). Also try big wave fins, such as Sunny Garcia FCS. They will give you bite on big bottom turns. Make sure you can hold your breath in case you eat it at the bottom, and get hit by the wave behind it as you come up. Here is a tip: Take off on the last wave of the set to avoid double wave beat downs. Have fun :-)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,448
    Quote Originally Posted by leethestud View Post
    it's not an equipment problem. That coil sounds rad. Shoot, if anything, leave it at home and get a crappy log. You will catch more waves and ultimately become a better surfer. It's all about being in the right place in the right time, or, rather, putting yourself there.

    Oh yeah, in central Fl I wouldn't worry too much about hh-doh... and if you are traveling you will quickly adjust. Big waves are easier, but maybe I just say that because I am lazy.
    Thanks Lee, the equipment is definitely not the issue (it's all me for sure), I just want to work more in harmony with what my equipment is designed to do if you will.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,448
    Quote Originally Posted by sisurfdogg View Post
    Try jumping off bridges, high dives and rock quarrys to get used to that feeling of hurling over the ledge. One split second of hesitation and you get lip launched. (Make sure you snorkel the water below the bridge first to make sure you are not landing on any submerged cars, etc). Also try big wave fins, such as Sunny Garcia FCS. They will give you bite on big bottom turns. Make sure you can hold your breath in case you eat it at the bottom, and get hit by the wave behind it as you come up. Here is a tip: Take off on the last wave of the set to avoid double wave beat downs. Have fun :-)
    Thanks brotha, been to PR twice now and got a good taste of some 6-8+ (some 10ft faces) as well as some big Nor'Eastern and Cane swells here in FL, I've managed to catch some waves in that size range, just trying to get more consistent on those days. Sometimes I don't hesitate and I just go for it no matter what, others I pull back at the last second because my instinct tells me it's a closeout. I don't want to throw myself into a closeout with my shoulders as susceptible as they are (lots of dislocations and they pop out easily if not careful), so when I go I want to make sure i'm getting into the wave and not getting into an ambulance. I know nothing is guaranteed and the only way to truly get good on those days is to just take the beatings but i'm trying to weigh the risk / reward with my shoulders and or life. Feel me? Moreso than anything though, I want to master the smaller days 1st, the larger days will come with time if I can get more skilled in the HH and under. As far as fins go, i'll have to look into some big wave fins like you said, i'm currently rocking the TC Aqualines and they are rad, but maybe not enough fin for 6-8-10ft?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Singer Island
    Posts
    1,416
    I left my Sunny Garcia FCS fins in my HPSB after a trip to Costa Rica because I was too lazy to take them out. I went out in HH surf here in FL and it really bogged on the turns. These fins crave the juice, love the power and speed of a big drop. You sacrifice a bit of maneuverability. but who cares when you make that balls out drop and get launched down the line. As far as sore shoulders go, I feel your pain DawnPatrolSUP. I have dislocated mine a few times. Yoga and tai chi can help you rehab it, with kneeling push ups to help strengthen. Now I can do full push ups again, but it took me a year to get back to this point after the last beat down. I am way too old for big closeouts, that is why I won't surf it big anymore unless it has an easy entry. Then I have to remember to kick out the back on the inside shore pound. Damn I hope it gets overhead soon.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,448
    Quote Originally Posted by sisurfdogg View Post
    I left my Sunny Garcia FCS fins in my HPSB after a trip to Costa Rica because I was too lazy to take them out. I went out in HH surf here in FL and it really bogged on the turns. These fins crave the juice, love the power and speed of a big drop. You sacrifice a bit of maneuverability. but who cares when you make that balls out drop and get launched down the line. As far as sore shoulders go, I feel your pain DawnPatrolSUP. I have dislocated mine a few times. Yoga and tai chi can help you rehab it, with kneeling push ups to help strengthen. Now I can do full push ups again, but it took me a year to get back to this point after the last beat down. I am way too old for big closeouts, that is why I won't surf it big anymore unless it has an easy entry. Then I have to remember to kick out the back on the inside shore pound. Damn I hope it gets overhead soon.
    Before I picked up the TC's I was looking at the Red Lines which I understand are a larger fin for bigger waves, any experience with those? Thankfully I haven't injured my shoulders in a while, been better with taking care of them in bad situations, like pulling my arms in on big wipeouts and such. They still ache when I have long sessions or several days in a row, but I pop some aleeve, drink some beer, burn one down, stretch, and all is better...

  10. #10
    watch lots of contests and videos of the pros when your not surfing and pause at each part of a move like before , during and after a turn to see what they are doing, the most important aspect is proper form, because unless your form is correct then you could try the same move forever and never get it right so try to have someone video you surfing in order to see what you need to work on.