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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Northern New England
    Posts
    517
    Emass - I hear Uncle Sam is giving out free tickets to go surf in Syria. You should sign up, brah dawg.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
    Posts
    1,539
    I don't mean to sound mean or anything,but how do u not know about Hawaiian winters?the surf will probably be too big for u unless u have big wave guns and can go paddle out at 10ft sunset or 8ft Haleiwa.there will be no shortage of waves but youll paddle out with the worlds best in the most dangerous stretches of reef in the middle pacific.i wish I was u and I was going to Hawaii.unfortunatly im stuck surfing shytty eastcoast waves

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by cepriano View Post
    I don't mean to sound mean or anything,but how do u not know about Hawaiian winters?the surf will probably be too big for u unless u have big wave guns and can go paddle out at 10ft sunset or 8ft Haleiwa.there will be no shortage of waves but youll paddle out with the worlds best in the most dangerous stretches of reef in the middle pacific.i wish I was u and I was going to Hawaii.unfortunatly im stuck surfing shytty eastcoast waves
    Course I know it's big there. Also that there's many breaks there some of which do not get as big or crowded as others. Looking for first-hand info from the experts on here.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Not Nicaragua
    Posts
    117
    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Course I know it's big there. Also that there's many breaks there some of which do not get as big or crowded as others. Looking for first-hand info from the experts on here.
    1st hand expert info on what? it seems like you have everything figured out already. i already asked a really logical question that i will ask again without the smarta$$ but still the same amount of obvious

    what is more consistent: Massachusetts or Hawaii.

  5. #15
    I lived on Oahu for 15 years and pretty much surfed year round. Oct/Nov is a great time to go. There is a chance for leftover southern hemi storm swell for the south and east shores, and you can get early season north swells (that aren't crazy huge). Swells will wrap, so even when the north shore is macking and out of your comfort zone, you can find smaller, ridable waves. There is also wind swell from the everpresent tradewinds that usually creates ridable surf on the windward side (that sometimes wraps to North Shore spots like Laniakea).

    Oahu + car is probably your best bet (vs. another island). Not to plug one of swellinfo's "competitors," but Surf News Network gave the best forecast for all shores on Oahu. They used to just do a phone forecast but have a decent web site now.

    There are some spots where an obvious rental car will get broken into.

    You should do what you can to find someone who lives there and surfs there to take you out. Friend of a friend of a friend or whatever. Going with someone who knows can save you a lot of headache. Or take someone like me who used to lived there.
    Last edited by funkyspec; Sep 3, 2013 at 10:06 PM.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by funkyspec View Post
    I lived on Oahu for 15 years and pretty much surfed year round. Oct/Nov is a great time to go. There is a chance for leftover southern hemi storm swell for the south and east shores, and you can get early season north swells (that aren't crazy huge). Swells will wrap, so even when the north shore is macking and out of your comfort zone, you can find smaller, ridable waves. There is also wind swell from the everpresent tradewinds that usually creates ridable surf on the windward side (that sometimes wraps to North Shore spots like Laniakea).

    Oahu + car is probably your best bet (vs. another island). Not to plug one of swellinfo's "competitors," but Surf News Network gave the best forecast for all shores on Oahu. They used to just do a phone forecast but have a decent web site now.

    There are some spots where an obvious rental car will get broken into.

    You should do what you can to find someone who lives there and surfs there to take you out. Friend of a friend of a friend or whatever. Going with someone who knows can save you a lot of headache. Or take someone like me who used to lived there.
    Great stuff, thank you!

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Great stuff, thank you!
    Emass- Whatever happened on your El Salvador trip ? You posted tons of questions on packing boards, food, what to bring etc But never saw any pictures of the waves or the set ups or even a trip report?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Your Mom's Vag
    Posts
    1,700
    I mean come on really, you did research but are asking here? As has been stated:

    1. It's Hawaii of course there will be waves, especially since you have been surfing less than year or two and are from the east coast they will be sick compared to our norm so yes there will be waves.

    2. It's an island and pretty open to swell almost everywhere so yes there will be waves.

    3. It's late October start of November so the waves will begin pumping so again yes there will waves.

    4. See #'s 1-3 above.

    5. Oh in case I forgot to mention it's Hawaii and you are from the East Coast so YES THERE WILL BE WAVES!!!!

    The Hawaiians have not answered you becasue they are to busy surfing since they have waves to be on the intraweb posting on SI. Sorry to be rude but posting that you did research and then asking these questions seems a little like covertly trying to brag that you are going to Hawaii. Hell if I were going back I'd be all na na boo boo I'm going to Hawaii!

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by JTS View Post
    Emass- Whatever happened on your El Salvador trip ? You posted tons of questions on packing boards, food, what to bring etc But never saw any pictures of the waves or the set ups or even a trip report?
    Ask and you shall receive. Disclaimer that this is my first novel here in quite some time in the event I've got much to report and it will either be stokefully welcomed, hated on, disbelieved, or ignored by all on here. The pics are forthcoming as soon as the locals in Flores/Mango send them over from our sessions the last day there. Should be a good reel of some quality rides and far more instances of schitt eating. It was all great fun and very educational. The trek back and forth to the east was the right move by far. Made for a busy final day but the crowds and closeouts at Tunco were things I had enough of after a few days.

    Very kind people down there in ES and they're doing a great job with building a surf culture that's only been popularized at all in the last 5 years. Most people there on the water have mad skill and there were more than a few young kids who simply ripped. I gifted my two boards at the end of the trip to the people who took the best care of us. Good thing I had the Espaņol to speak as I needed it 3/4 of the time, although my dialect is PR/DR and CenAm is different.

    Was very prepared thanks to several of you and smart planning and that kept me off the toilet, bug-free, safe, and at the right spots. Did nothing other than surf, eat, and sleep for 7 days and it was rejuvving for me. The one setback was getting slammed to the sand bottom on a closeout at low tide on a beach break the second morning. I knew better than to stay out there past the 2 hour window of optimal tide but you know my stoke and I was starting to get some calibration to the Pacific waves which Gaffer is completely on point about being a whole new ball game compared to EC windswell and gradually declining topography.

    Someone said just yesterday on here how shallow water sessions in smaller waves are far more perilous than riding bigger and that's damn truth. If there was a place to get blunt trauma in the lumbar region it was where I did on the lower right side. Pain is something I easily get past and my only concern at first was a possible fracture or other injury you just don't mess with. Once I discerned it was just a badly compressed nerve I got busy getting back out there by resting, hitting la farmacia, and staying hydrated and fed with anti-inflammatory foods. Missed a few sessions in total but a man's gotta live to fight another day. In retrospect, I'm fortunate for the daily hours I've put in on the water and recently on the Carver board because a less-trained core would've rejected that impact in a major way.

    I saw volcanos. I saw waves as clean and sick as Indo according to some of my vet counterparts. Charged in bath water temps yet showered in May water temps in Mass. Because of dog balls being allowed to hang low and loose and full of juice, I saw more canines per cubic meter than trash in Bridgeport. Ate papaya that is so fresh it might give sight to the blind. I charged an evening sesh where, on one end, the sun was setting upon an idyllic horizon of lush rural mountainside, and on the other end an apocalyptic blackness of storm and pitchfork lightning blew in; it was like Genesis. Saw complete nights of lightning that lit up sporadic parts of the whole sky like a switchboard or pinball machine, then clearer nights I saw 3/4 of the entire celestial sky (we see half up here). Went days speaking the native language of others that have had a very different and tougher existence than me yet was welcomed as family by them and had rapport with them on several common grounds of culture and simple respect.

    It was fulfilling and I enjoyed every minute of it. You know I charged the home break the night I flew back in though, and the day after we had some of the best waves of the summer here. I could actually feel what was happening again and my board's tail get lifted during a takeoff rather than getting shott off the lip over the falls or closed out on in the trough if I wasn't in the exact right place at the exact time. This pastime presents itself in many different shapes, sizes, colors, and forms and they are all worth being stoked from. Even the 6 inches of mush for 40 days and 40 nights up here. It keeps us itching and thankful for every scrap of glass and gnarl we do get.

    Next up, SD in a week for 6 days to visit great friends, charge as many renowned breaks as I can, and catch a couple days of the Hurley Pro so I can be awed by those in this world who make what's arguably the toughest athletic domain look effortless and flawless. I'm thankful for having the opportunity to experience all this and several of you have guided my way. I'm still merely a grasshopper though hopefully in time I'll be a grasshopper that can throw a bucket or two.
    Last edited by EmassSpicoli; Sep 4, 2013 at 01:44 AM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Central NJ
    Posts
    245
    6+ years living on Oahu.......+1 to what Funky said above.....town can be as good as country.....don't leave stuff in your rental....just drive around......good times.