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Thread: big waves?

  1. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    Anytime dude, all this talk of periods is starting to sound like a bunch of women talking in a public bathroom
    you two should get a room or maybe you could share a paddle board on romantic tampa bay dawn patrol. i understand once the period creeps up over 5 sec's it really comes alive down there.

  2. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by ECswell View Post
    so funny what size people on the EC claim waves are. i surfed wit a dorky irish guy at cape cod a few weeks ago and it was 1-2 ft. waist high tops. he claimed it was 6'-7'. im still confused about how he claims dat.

    east coast scale is a little off. your 10' is 2-3 in HI.
    but in reality a 10 foot wave is a 10 foot wave period...

  3. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by travy View Post
    you two should get a room or maybe you could share a paddle board on romantic tampa bay dawn patrol. i understand once the period creeps up over 5 sec's it really comes alive down there.
    Yeah but you should see it at 7 seconds.........

    And me and SUP don't need a room. We 're children of nature and camp on the beach, and pick seashellls by the seashore.

    Travy, go study the sciences of de weather for two years. Don't surf just study. Then you'll be that much more prepared to surf after the two years. Instead of surfing you can spend the day debating if the current swell's period is long enough to create a suitable wave according to the botton conditions of your immediate area..........Opps in the last hour, your favorite boy or buoy or buouy just reported a loss of a foot in the swell. Ok, back to the figures and caculations.....

  4. #74
    Quote Originally Posted by Paddington Jetty Bear View Post
    Yeah but you should see it at 7 seconds.........

    And me and SUP don't need a room. We 're children of nature and camp on the beach, and pick seashellls by the seashore.

    Travy, go study the sciences of de weather for two years. Don't surf just study. Then you'll be that much more prepared to surf after the two years. Instead of surfing you can spend the day debating if the current swell's period is long enough to create a suitable wave according to the botton conditions of your immediate area..........Opps in the last hour, your favorite boy or buoy or buouy just reported a loss of a foot in the swell. Ok, back to the figures and caculations.....
    yeah it sucks to not be an unemployed beach bum who can surf anytime the wind turns for a half hour and the tide is just right. those of us who have to be a bit more surgical with our strikes unfortunately have to pay attention to all that science sh!t yo.


  5. #75
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    People with jobs aren't real surfers.........

    They aren't dedicated.

    Corky Carrol never worked.

    Hey, get yourself a gig doing Miller Lite commercials.

    Less filling? or Tastes Great?

    What's your take?

    Actually those who are gainfully employed, just go when you are off. What's the problem? If there's waves and you aren't working then you go. Seems pretty simple to me..........watching weather models a week in advance isn't going to garauntee anything. You don't take off in advance. If you are going to ditch work, you make sure it's worth it. Even solid predictions for the next morning are wrong many times. Yeah, it's solid and the winds are NW but it's just not really doing it. It happens.

    God we would never have these problems if Erock helped me form MarijuanaLand, an island nation with me, Paddington Jetty Bear, as your friendly dictator. Erock, Minister of Carpentry and Plants, of course........

  6. #76
    Quote Originally Posted by sandblasters View Post
    but in reality a 10 foot wave is a 10 foot wave period...
    like Tom Curren once said....depends where your from.


    PJB is right about real surfers not working. but didn't go far enough....no real surfer would live on the east coast by choice.

  7. #77
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    Hahahaha great discussion boys!!! Thanks for the morning laughs!

  8. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by seldom seen View Post
    Hahahaha great discussion boys!!! Thanks for the morning laughs!
    OK give us ten dollars for gratuity.

  9. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paddington Jetty Bear View Post
    People with jobs aren't real surfers.........

    They aren't dedicated.

    Corky Carrol never worked.

    Hey, get yourself a gig doing Miller Lite commercials.

    Less filling? or Tastes Great?

    What's your take?

    Actually those who are gainfully employed, just go when you are off. What's the problem? If there's waves and you aren't working then you go. Seems pretty simple to me..........watching weather models a week in advance isn't going to garauntee anything. You don't take off in advance. If you are going to ditch work, you make sure it's worth it. Even solid predictions for the next morning are wrong many times. Yeah, it's solid and the winds are NW but it's just not really doing it. It happens.

    God we would never have these problems if Erock helped me form MarijuanaLand, an island nation with me, Paddington Jetty Bear, as your friendly dictator. Erock, Minister of Carpentry and Plants, of course........
    word!!most people on earth work.some are lucky and have enough funds in the bank to surf whenever they want.it isn't like the old days where u can go live off the land and be a beachbum,which is cool but that's not reality nowadays.what ever region your from that's what u do.city kids skate,ride bmx.beach kids go surf and boogieboard.and people like me who grew up near the woods,we rode dirtbikes.i havnt been on a dirtbike in 10yrs,since I don't have one and live near the beach.i surf for fun,dont care if im rippin or look like a kook,but aslong as nobodys around,who cares!!lol...I cant really see someone on the ec being a full time surfer.theyd blow their brains out from boredom of flat spells.i surf when I can and have time.its not on my number 1 priority list.gay stuff like working,buying groceries,paying bills,driving on an empty tank of gas.thats my life.maybe one day if I stumble upon a bunch of dead Mexicans in the desert with a pickup full of blow,il become the white paalos escobos and can go move to indo and surf perfect waves and eat cockroaches.but until then il live my gay fulfilling life of being an American robot

  10. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by catmaster2 View Post
    for a normal 10ft east coast wave do you need to train for days like that and how long do you normally stay under for?
    The fall is the east coast's most common time for long-period waves (like 17s) and they can reform more
    easily and be a potential hazard. When the first good 'cane swells come, take some nice duck-dives
    to get your lungs hyperventilating a little. You can easily double your ability to hold your breath as I
    guess hyperventilating stuffs more oxygen into the nooks and crannies of your body somehow - how I don't
    know. So even at the beginning of your sessions, do some hyperventilating. A 2-wave hold-down COULD
    keep you down longer than 30 seconds (most older people get a little nervous at this point, but younger
    guys probably would NOT get very nervous, perhaps a little). But 30 seconds is NOT pleasant for anyone.
    But a younger guy who hyperventilates and doesn't swallow water can handle this no problem. But
    what if your mouth was open and you swallowed water (which can happen even on a 2-foot wave). Keep
    your mouth closed.

    2) Inspect your equipment - like your fins - make sure they are not broken or loose as this can affect
    your bottom-turning even if only slightly worse than usual.

    3) Keep in mind that longer-period hurricane swells are more likely to reform and keep spilling and can
    easily have enough power to keep throwing you back towards the shallower water. This can be
    good or bad. If there are rips coming off of a wall or something, the effect of even a small 2-foot wave
    can be amplified by the rip current and you can be slammed down by a now huge rip-sucking wave into the sand. Be careful of where you are surfing. I've seen it all at the basic beach-breaks of New England. I'm not
    as used to the reefs.

    To summarize:
    Just before you paddle out on a big day:
    1) Remind the principal of your school to let everyone out early, if it's really big, I think
    school should just be cancelled.
    2) Hyperventilate for a little while - start this in the classroom before school lets out.
    3) Check your equipment - your surfboard (hopefully it's a pintail gun, after all, this is basically
    your only chance to use it, but round-tails are easier so don't take the pintail out unless your arms
    are as big as mine or you'll miss the wave)
    4) Make sure you have the right temperature wax for your board. If necessary, leave it out in the sun, and
    wipe it off, and then rewax it.

    Long before you go out on a big day:
    1) Run or
    2) Swim
    3) Climb hills or ride a bike to get in shape
    4) Climb stairs
    5) Lift weights - this increases not just muscle, but also your lung capacity
    6) Alert the school to the upcoming tropical system a week ahead of time

    Let's just say that those clean hurricane swell sets with little in between are a hazard if you're out of shape.

    Running during flat spells is a great way to increase lung capacity. Swimming is almost as good, for some
    people, it's even better (like if you kick a lot).

    I've been under for a while, and I'm not proud of it!

    All I can say is your from the Carolinas - you've probably seen plenty of giant surf!

    Beware of jetties and semi-points that can tend to have rips outwards that amplify swell or refract it by funneling it. An example - Jersey has jetty breaks like 7th Street in Ocean City where the final drop into the wave can get pretty gnarly - enough for at least a double-thrashing if you get pitched off your board. You may need more gun under you sometimes. There are even breaks that are marked as a hazard in Jersey. I almost broke my tibia on a wave at 7th Street - my leg bent like a boomerang but it snapped back and I was just sore for the next year.

    Beware of shallow spots just inside the point - there tends to be a shallow spot at whatever tide happens to be the troublesome tide at that point.

    Beware of washing machines - areas with strong rips out of deep water ending in shallow. Even Newport 2nd Beach in Newport, RI, has one of these as you go to get out of the water - it can be troublesome under the wrong tide/swell/wind conditions if you don't just surf your way smoothly to the beach to get out of the water.
    Last edited by ScorchieLeWave; Sep 9, 2013 at 12:51 PM.