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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    VA Beach
    Posts
    110

    Longboard Surfboard vs. Skateboard

    Hi,

    I had some questions for folks here on the list that have had more experience with this type of decision, and can hopefully give me some insight on what will be better for my surfing progression.

    Basically, I have the cash for either getting a skateboard like a 31" Carver (that's what I'm specifically looking at since I've been reading on the net it's the closest thing to surfing), or a longboard/funboard surfboard (something close to or over 8'). Right now I own a 6'2x19x2 3/4" WRV shortboard, as well as a Rusty 6'8x20 1/2"x2 3/4" thruster that is still technically a shortboard, but since I'm only around 155lbs and 6ft tall, it floats me really well, and allows me to catch more waves on the knee-to-thigh high days, or on high tides when my 6'2 just doesn't cut it.

    My goal at this point is to ultimately improve my shortboard wave-riding skills. This would include really working on pumping down the line on both my front and backside, turning and carving a wave, and with time progress into round-abouts, cutbacks, etc. At this point I can paddle into and catch most waves pretty well, get a decent bottom-turn on my front-side, and then ride the line. The upper-body/lower-body sync is escaping me though for nicely coordinated pumping down the line to generate additional speed and power once I've made the initial drop. Also trying to turn on my backside lands me on my butt. Slaloming around people in a crowded line-up has also been out-of-the-question at the moment because I don't feel I have the control I need of my turns. Finally, going left on my backside (I'm regular footed) leads to a pretty crappy ride that ends in the flats because again, I don't have control of the bottom turn on my backside to make a good drop and then ride down the line to the left like I can do on my frontside to the right.

    Some of my friends say get the skateboard ... others say the fact that I don't have a longboard is really bad, and that riding a longboard will progress me far more in all of the shortboard skills I want to learn than riding any skateboard (especially a gimmicky Carver).

    At this point I've been leaning towards the Carver skateboard because I feel that repetitively doing something that feels very close to surfing a controlled environment will allow me to fine-tune the muscle memory I need to hone my riding skills, and I can do so irrespective of the wind/wave conditions. But again, others are telling me the skill-sets aren't that close, and what I really need is the greater wave count and ride time that a longer board will get me. Decisions, decisions ... Any thoughts from the rest of you that have experience with both?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    3,697
    Get the Log dude, you'll be happy you did

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilmington, North Carolina, United States
    Posts
    639
    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    Get the Log dude, you'll be happy you did
    I agree...and once you figure out what a LB allows you to do on a wave...you probably won't go back to a shortie...I know i didn't go back. And you're in VA beach? oh god yea..LB all the way...no more flopping around on knee to waist high waves trying to get up speed and do a " maneuver " . Shortboarding (as done by 98% of surfers) is ugly. there I said it.
    LBing is graceful and all that jazz. And it allows you to surf MORE.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    UGHHH! :(
    Posts
    314
    Quote Originally Posted by babybabygrand View Post
    no more flopping around on knee to waist high waves trying to get up speed and do a " maneuver " . Shortboarding (as done by 98% of surfers) is ugly.
    I see mid length boards becoming more popular with good surfers for this reason. Check out a 7'6'' Stoker V Machine. Some board like that can surf on 90% of east coast conditions. I wish I had one.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilmington, North Carolina, United States
    Posts
    639
    Quote Originally Posted by bassplayer View Post
    I see mid length boards becoming more popular with good surfers for this reason. Check out a 7'6'' Stoker V Machine. Some board like that can surf on 90% of east coast conditions. I wish I had one.
    wow that does sound like a tasty morsel. pulling a floater on boards 7'6" and up is like the coolest feeling in the world. stalling for barrels is easier too it seems...man i just love Logs!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by bassplayer View Post
    I see mid length boards becoming more popular with good surfers for this reason. Check out a 7'6'' Stoker V Machine. Some board like that can surf on 90% of east coast conditions. I wish I had one.
    I have a 7'7 Stretch that is as HP as a mid length can get. The board is phenomenal and fun as hell. However, how many days have I rode it in four months? Maybe three. Why? It's not a shortboard and isn't getting me better on a shortboard like riding a shortboard is. I've got fatty grovelers and a retro fish for the days I need to get into even the crappiest of "waves". True, it's not a longboard, but my SB skill has transcended in the last three months as a result of going shorter on my SBs and riding the Carver daily as well. This would not have happened if I was riding my 7'7 every day I found waves. I can now ride HPs in the right waves and for a guy that's only been at it for 8 months, you gotta believe my recipe has worked especially if I'm riding that in New England.

    But yeah, everybody and their sister loves my mid length and it is a great board. May bring it to SoCal when I go back next month just to mix it up between SB riding.

  7. #7
    Another thing about wave positioning is that it's a hell of a lot more critical to be able to do that on a SB than a LB. so on the reps you're easing into a successful takeoff far out on the shoulder on a LB, that's helping reinforce your proper SB wave positioning? Na brah. Law of Specificity. You want to get better on hunting waves on a shortboard, then hunt waves on a shortboard. This guy doesn't seem to be asking how to cross-step or nose ride better. He wants to throw bucket and smack lips and hack like Mick Fanning.

    Does that mean mid lengths weren't my gateway to progressing at the onset of my surfing? Schitt they were. But this guy isn't a complete beginner and he seems to be doing alright on a non-LB. Just wants to do better.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilmington, North Carolina, United States
    Posts
    639
    Quote Originally Posted by babybabygrand View Post
    I agree...and once you figure out what a LB allows you to do on a wave...you probably won't go back to a shortie...I know i didn't go back. And you're in VA beach? oh god yea..LB all the way...no more flopping around on knee to waist high waves trying to get up speed and do a " maneuver " . Shortboarding (as done by 98% of surfers) is ugly. there I said it.
    LBing is graceful and all that jazz. And it allows you to surf MORE.
    oh and there's some awful looking Longboarding going down all over the planet too..didn't mean to imply that style just comes with the board.but all in all Shortboarders who are only concerned with trying "maneuvers" are the ones most guilty of making Surfing "look" bad. It's an art for Christ sake not a sport. Everyone should Lose the "maneuver" mentality. What you do on the board should be about riding the wave. LBing (and riding ALL the other types of boards) will help with that!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    VA Beach
    Posts
    110
    I guess my hesitancy is that longboard riding style, or at least in relation to the guys I see riding longboards, seems quite a bit different from shortboard riding style, as well as the fact that many of the longboarders I know can't really ride shortboards well. This is not an indictment against longboarders, merely an observation that makes wonder whether riding a longboard is the best way (compared to the skateboard) to improve my shortboard riding skills since I don't see many folks making the transition back-and-forth very well...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Singer Island
    Posts
    1,113
    Quote Originally Posted by jasorod View Post
    I guess my hesitancy is that longboard riding style, or at least in relation to the guys I see riding longboards, seems quite a bit different from shortboard riding style, as well as the fact that many of the longboarders I know can't really ride shortboards well. This is not an indictment against longboarders, merely an observation that makes wonder whether riding a longboard is the best way (compared to the skateboard) to improve my shortboard riding skills since I don't see many folks making the transition back-and-forth very well...
    This is true only for people who never learned on a shortboard and never were good watermen to begin with. I rode a shorboard or a fish exclusively for many many years and totally dissed on loggers. Finally inherited a Donald Takayama noserider which sucked. Then I rode a friends HPLB and it ripped. I could carve where I used to flail in knee to waist high mush. After years of riding both long and shortboards, I can say without a doubt that 1. my style has gotten smoother and more fluid 2. I have caught and enjoyed much more surf. Many of my friends who grew up on a shortboard have said the same thing. Try it, you'll like it!