LOGIN | REGISTER

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12
  1. #1

    Sand Pumping Meeting- NJ

    Anyone go to this?


    U.S. Army Corps will hold beach replenishment info session in Manasquan

    Oct. 14, 2013 | Comments

    ADVERTISEMENT
    MANASQUAN — The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers along with the Department of Environmental Protection will be holding an information session this Thursday at the Manasquan Borough Hall to discuss their beach replenishment project.

    Residents are encouraged to attend the session, which starts at 6:30 p.m. Borough Hall is located at 201 East Main Street.
    This project is for the beaches of Manasquan, Sea Girt, Spring Lake and Belmar.
    The Army Corps estimates beach filling operations will begin the week of Oct. 27 or the week of Nov. 3 and continue into January. This schedule is subject to change as this type of work is very sensitive to weather conditions, which could delay the work.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Long Buried Island
    Posts
    683
    Dont waste your time. The templates are already in place. If you want to make a change be prepared for the next beach replenishment down the line. Try to make amendments to the templates so they consider building sandbars and spits during the project. They tried to build a sandbar here in Cedars for a 10 block section this past summer during the replenishment project and it seems to be working somewhat. It would have worked much better if they continued it the whole way down the beach.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    21N 158W give or take
    Posts
    1,960
    Pump is done deal, for now, keep your eye on it, and keep your yap sealed...... After the pump, some peaks will flare up and only locals will know, biggest thing is stfu when some place starts breaking, if someone asks where you are going, tell them you have community service hours or something. Most of you are criminals anyway, right?

    also, there is one spot that wont be pumped, I aint gonna say, but it doesn't get pumped. ever. its a lil fickle, but you can score it, I have in the past, with only one or two people, or by myself.
    Hint: Ocean county. if you know where I am talking about, dont say it

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilmington, North Carolina, United States
    Posts
    631
    but I thought the US Govt was dumping all of our money into that big hole out in the desert? When did they switch to throwing it into the Atlantic Ocean? As a tea party member I don't like being mislead on how and WHERE our money is being thrown away! or as I like to scream... "Hey Boner! If you're gonna throw all our money away you better make sure its Constitutional!"

    ---sorry guys I was just acting out a one man play in my head just then----

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    21N 158W give or take
    Posts
    1,960
    the money hole park was closed and the money fire went out, now they gotta put it elsewhere


    http://www.theonion.com/video/in-the...ing-mon,14289/

    If you love America, you throw money in its hole!

  6. #6
    They do it all the time down here in Florida. We don't have rocks and stuff like you all do to hold the beach in place from washing away. Don't worry though, whatever they do it won't last long. Everytime they dredge out and pump sand here it doesn't take long at all for it to get washed back away. In fact in order to help the dunes from eroding everyone throws their old Xmas tree out in front of the dunes on the beach.

    Course it may work out for the better. You never know, it may create an epic spot!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Long Buried Island
    Posts
    683
    Quote Originally Posted by babybabygrand View Post
    but I thought the US Govt was dumping all of our money into that big hole out in the desert? When did they switch to throwing it into the Atlantic Ocean? As a tea party member I don't like being mislead on how and WHERE our money is being thrown away! or as I like to scream... "Hey Boner! If you're gonna throw all our money away you better make sure its Constitutional!"

    ---sorry guys I was just acting out a one man play in my head just then----
    It is amazing that we allow the govt to literally throw our money into the ocean so a few govt workers and scientists can have a job telling us how important beach fills are. Just raise the homes and maintain the dunes, there that was easy.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Rehoboth
    Posts
    266
    I assume the Army Corp New York Region hosted the meeting? You're lucky, not a common practice around here yet. Studying other regions (Florida & California) who are more active in replenishment projects and monitoring to obtain favorable surfing results from projects. The Mid Atlantic Region surf community and Organizations who support surfing need to step up their space of pre-project dialog with Army Corp and local stakeholders/shareholders. Whether we like it or not beach replenishment is the current model for the 21st Century to off set erosion so cursing these endeavors without collaboration is not nor will ever work in our favor.



    I won't argue the contracts and beach design are already completed although 2 major factors can speed up success/turn around of surf breaks are size of sand within the mapping sites. Finer sand through natural longshore drift is highly desirable for sand bar retention/development. Some mining sites hold medium/course sand while other near by sites compose of finer/medium sand so more influence by the public for those decision makers to choose the finer material. A common beach replenishment practice is a higher beach profile with a deeper slope (1:10) ( 1 foot drop for every 10 feet) as a defensive contour for storm damage. I thought the 1:10 was an advantage but further studying articles develops a plunging beach break. As other regions were more successful re-establishing sand bar/surf zone bar development with a flatter slope of 1:20 (1 foot drop for every 20 feet). Mother Nature has to do her part shifting the sand so if able to give her more finer sand and flatter slope to deposit the material should be worth the effort challenging status quo.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by goofy footer View Post
    I assume the Army Corp New York Region hosted the meeting? You're lucky, not a common practice around here yet. Studying other regions (Florida & California) who are more active in replenishment projects and monitoring to obtain favorable surfing results from projects. The Mid Atlantic Region surf community and Organizations who support surfing need to step up their space of pre-project dialog with Army Corp and local stakeholders/shareholders. Whether we like it or not beach replenishment is the current model for the 21st Century to off set erosion so cursing these endeavors without collaboration is not nor will ever work in our favor.



    I won't argue the contracts and beach design are already completed although 2 major factors can speed up success/turn around of surf breaks are size of sand within the mapping sites. Finer sand through natural longshore drift is highly desirable for sand bar retention/development. Some mining sites hold medium/course sand while other near by sites compose of finer/medium sand so more influence by the public for those decision makers to choose the finer material. A common beach replenishment practice is a higher beach profile with a deeper slope (1:10) ( 1 foot drop for every 10 feet) as a defensive contour for storm damage. I thought the 1:10 was an advantage but further studying articles develops a plunging beach break. As other regions were more successful re-establishing sand bar/surf zone bar development with a flatter slope of 1:20 (1 foot drop for every 20 feet). Mother Nature has to do her part shifting the sand so if able to give her more finer sand and flatter slope to deposit the material should be worth the effort challenging status quo.
    This is very good information and yes, the ACOE has been evaluating other sloping methods from what I have read.
    Do you work for Surfrider? I am surprised they are not trying to influence ACOE and the stakeholders with this type of information. From what I have seen of other beach fill projects in NJ, there is little if any sloping occuring. Monmouth Beach is current a massive berm which drops straight down to the ocean, in deep water and plunging (unsurfable) waves. A slope technique would at least save some breaks from this fate.

    Basically Surfrider Jersey Shore sent out a mass email basically saying sand pumping was coming, there's nothing we can do, and please document how bad it will mess up your beach. That's a pretty pathetic response for nationally recognized group in my opnion.

    Also, the current beach fill plans for Monmouth County involved a borrow area which is uncomfortably close to the Historic Area Remediation Sites (HARS). I think it is literally within a mile of that area. As far as I know no testing for any HARS related contaminants has been done from the soil cores they completed in the borrow area.
    So basically the public is at potential risk of contaminated HARS sediments being used as beach fill sands. The silence on this issue from Surfrider is deafening.

    As far as grain size goes, I've never seen a beach project use anything less than coarse sands around here. In fact, Monmouth beach even has a high gravel content which further exacerbates erosion (and makes for a disgusting looking beach I might add).

    Lastly, this is nothing like the original beach fill which they did in the late 90s and early 2000s. The budgets are much higher, and the quantity of sand is much more. I could literally see this shutting down every break in Monmouth County when it's all over.

  10. #10
    Based on the specs for AP to Avon, it looks like the ACOE is going with 1:20 (flatter slope) which I think they used in Harvey Cedars. I saw these guys a few weeks ago surveying and they were pretty far offshore, almost to the end of the jetty's. Makes you wonder what'll be left once they're done here in jetty country.