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  1. #1

    ...Lost "Couch Potato" / a review

    SIZE / CONST: I'm 6 ft/180 lbs, riding a 5'8" Couch Potato (top end of the recommended sizes for my weight). Mine is stock standard poly and it came with Future Seaworthy (Controller) fins. I've ridden it a solid 16 days, so figured I might be somewhat qualified to review it.

    PROS: The CP isn't thick, boaty or corky and, even at 36.5 liters vol, mine duck dives fairly easy. It's rails are relatively thin and grab easy. The nose isn't "beaky" and swing weight is manageable (more so than the Bottom Feeder, imo).

    Overall, mine is a little on the heavier side, but that might be a pro on this design (weight carries momentum and cuts chop). I love my CP's ability to connect sections and nose ride all the way to the beach, yet still do small, shortboard-esque maneuvers along the way. It's "different", with very little familiarity to my snappy hybrids.

    CONS: Lost describes the CP as "fun and easy"...which could also be translated as compromised performance and lack of versatility. It rides best in fatter, waist high waves (not too mushy), but might function up to head high as long as the wave is slopey.

    I'm not that strong a paddler and, unfortunately, my CP doesn't paddle as well as I expected. Trying to catch anything under waist high mush is almost as difficult as a standard hybrid shortboard. The CP's "rocker" is so flat, a wave needs to be on the chubbier side to avoid pearling or catching a rail.

    Despite the round nose and the widest point way forward (at dead center), it really doesn't get in early...so don't think you can get away with taking the CP out in punchy/dumping waves (you will get pitched). However, you're still going to need a relatively jacked up takeoff or peak to get this craft going...it doesn't catch rolley, unbroken waves or shoulders like a longboard can.

    There's zero flip in the nose, so, even when just paddling, keeping the nose out of water is extra difficult (that is, in anything other than glass). Furthermore, you have to skooch way up on the nose to get the best paddle out of the CP (top of your head literally inches from the nose).

    At 22 inches, my board isn't extremely wide, but the 17+" tail is. Most of the sensitivity to turns (I've grown used to on my pulled in thrusters) is absent...especially toeside. Getting my CP on rail is not effortless nor "front footed".

    RIDE
    : "Nose rides" are stable/smooth and, if you crank on the tail, it'll throw buckets. However, no matter what fins installed, this design mainly wants to trim.

    The CP is not "crazy fast", but it's fast enough. You'll still need to pump the board for any real speed (assuming the wave and fin choice even allow for that).

    FINS: Of all the fins I tried, the Seaworthy's minimal drag from their swept back shape gives them the best glide in any size wave...however, they don't turn very sensitively on this tail shape. I can do cutbacks, bottom turns and lippers with them, but these maneuvers are sluggish and take more effort than I'd like. They'll also let the board go vert...eventually (but, of course, the CP's lack of rocker can make re-entries super sketchy). I had a hard time getting the board to pump for speed with the Seaworthies, but they still perform little maneuvers even if a wave dwindles down to ankle high.

    More upright front fins make this board higher performance...but only in the mid-higher end of it's wave size range. With T1 fronts + the Seaworthy trailers, it turned more responsively. I could easily pump up the speed and do tight, rail skashing turns with them. This'll probably be my "go to" fin setup on this board...even though, when a wave gets really small, they cease to perform as well as the full Seaworthy set.

    With the 5 box "convertible", I also tried just the T1 twins + TT1 center trailer (no quad rears) and the board acted really bizarre...at times, not turning at all. So far, the quad trailers appear necessary for this board to turn smoothly and consistently.

    Not sure why Mayhem added a 5th box on this shape. If the waves require more "bite" than as a big finned quad, the CP probably isn't the board you should be using...for that matter, I don't think this design really needs a leash plug, either.

    CONCLUSION
    : It's a fun board, in it's own way. It doesn't "rip" as well or easily as hybrid fishes I've had, but the CP has good qualities they don't...and it's for a smaller wave, anyhow. Riding waves all the way through the inside is kinda "my thing" (and not all hybrids are always able to do that) but I dislike the "stiffness" of longer boards.

    The CP will glide all the way to the inside on almost any wave, but, unless you're a paddling machine, don't think you're gonna paddle it into ankle-knee high mush like a longboard. As far as paddling, it can't compete with a longboard, but, once on the wave, will out-maneuver them. The CP might fill the small niche just above the longboard or funboard, but below a hybrid/stub.

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    Last edited by waterbaby; Dec 24, 2013 at 11:49 PM. Reason: Since this review, it appears Lost has revised this shape to include a quick flip in the first 3" of the nose...Matt listens

  2. #2
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    Insightful review, plenty of important details; thanks for posting. (Sounds kinda like my Rusty Dwart.)

    Hoping like he!! that my newly-purchased ...Lost Lay Z Boy is a swifter, less-draggy paddler than my Dwart aka The Brick.
    Last edited by yankee; Nov 27, 2013 at 02:19 AM. Reason: contrails....effing contrails...everywhere I look

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Thanks for the review, waterbaby!

    I haven't felt one of these up yet...

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by yankee View Post
    Insightful review, plenty of important details; thanks for posting. (Sounds kinda like my Rusty Dwart.)

    Hoping like he!! that my newly-purchased ...Lost Lay Z Boy is a swifter, less-draggy paddler than my Dwart aka The Brick.
    thanks.

    I owned a rusty piranha and it actually paddled really well, but, other than the full nose, it was definitely in the hybrid hpsb area...plenty of tail rocker and not much of a glider. Point is, I do love rusty's shapes and thought about getting the dwart, but went with the couch potato because biolos seems like he's really making an effort to design a board(s) for those that can only surf a handful of times per month. I also tried a Bottom Feeder, but relative to the CP, it kinda struggled paddling and gliding through the reform to the inside.

    based on the CP, I think you're gonna like the paddling abilities of the LayZboy (although I heard it's now named the LayZtoy due to copyright hassles from the chair company)

  5. #5
    try the SA quad

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    I'm a little confused (check avatar). Nose riding a 5'8"? Too flat of a board for vertical re-entry? Nose barley breaking the surface while paddling (normal for my 28 years on short boards), riding to the beach is your thing even if the wave is a total burger? Seeking feathery crumbly shoulders to take off on? Rating a boards performance on a barely ridable section of wave? I'm not ripping on you I'm just Lost. Haha.

    I picked up a flat wide, nose under water while paddling, Lost v2 stub 6'0" 5 fin set for ultimate groveling this past summer. I rode 5'10"s for a while as all around boards. I'm not entirely sold on riding the shortest possible size anymore. Why create a harder paddling experience if your not gaining performance? Anyway my v2 stub is my first quad, I've ridden it in overhead surf, tubes included, and I love it. My only complaint would be its so fast that I come out of barrels to soon or can't slow down enough to get in them. Solution: taking off deeper and getting barreled while doing Mach 6. Vertical re-entry? No problem. The board is super fast while being as loose as I need it to. Besides barrels, doing full speed rail turns in the tightest possible radius on critical sections is my thing.
    I also have a 6'2" Lost beach buggy for good surf. Love that one too.
    Last edited by Doug; Nov 27, 2013 at 11:10 AM.

  7. #7
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    Oh, I forgot. You don't know why it has a leash plug? You prefer leashless boards? What's wrong with having a leash plug? My brain is farting hard and I'm fearing the arrival of something more than a fart.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    I'm a little confused (check avatar). Nose riding a 5'8"? Too flat of a board for vertical re-entry? Nose barley breaking the surface while paddling (normal for my 28 years on short boards), riding to the beach is your thing even if the wave is a total burger? Seeking feathery crumbly shoulders to take off on? Rating a boards performance on a barely ridable section of wave? I'm not ripping on you I'm just Lost. Haha.

    I picked up a flat wide, nose under water while paddling, Lost v2 stub 6'0" 5 fin set for ultimate groveling this past summer...I've ridden it in overhead surf...My only complaint would be its so fast that I come out of barrels to soon...
    Quote Originally Posted by Doug View Post
    Oh, I forgot. You don't know why it has a leash plug? You prefer leashless boards? What's wrong with having a leash plug? My brain is farting hard and I'm fearing the arrival of something more than a fart.
    I'm going to disregard your many questions as you were obviously very busy when posting (perhaps, on the toilet)...other than I guess you might have to actually ride the CP to completely understand what I'm saying.

    There were overhead barrels in jersey this summer?...I guess it's possible...somewhere.

    anyway, I also have a 5'11" V2 Stub in the quiver for waves a little steeper than the CP can handle. If the V2 Stub is the "ultimate groveler", that would make the Couch Potato the "ultra ultimate groveler" and a longboard...well, I guess one would have to fit the word "infinity" in there, somewhere. Maybe I'll post a review on the stub after I ride it a little more...feels good so far and, yes, I wear a leash on that one.
    Last edited by waterbaby; Nov 30, 2013 at 03:03 AM.

  9. #9
    I just picked up a Couch Potato but haven't put it in the water yet. I got a 6'er with 43 liters. I am 5'6", but my weight fluctuates between 170 and 185 without a wetsuit. I sized up because the role I want this board to play is my step down from my Weirdo Ripper. When the surf gets big/powerful enough to send the Weirdo down the line--usually about waist high for me, give or take---I will put it in the water. But the CP is for anything less. Hence the extra length and volume.

    I am psyched to hear that you can nose ride the CP. I love walking up and down the length of a longboard, and I purchased the CP anticipating that I would be moving quite a bit on the extra foam. I am anticipating this to ride like a cadillac.

  10. #10
    I think you're going to find that size CP waaay too big for you. These are wide boards...and they get exponentially wider in all parameters for each inch increment.

    A 6' CP is almost 23" wide, which, for someone your size, getting your arms around it for paddling (or even carrying it) could be difficult. However, the main issue will be tail width...you'll never be able to get that size tail on rail.

    The good news is Lost boards have incredible resale value. Sell at the beginning of summer and you could get most of your money back (although, if included, you should disclose what you did to the fins)...you won't have a problem finding a buyer. Then check Lost's volume calculator ("Guild Factor") for the right size board for your weight.
    Last edited by waterbaby; Feb 4, 2014 at 05:12 PM.