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Thread: 3d fin printing

  1. #11
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    it's about time...a fin is a perfect app for 3d printing. and if it breaks, go make another. the possibilities are endless.

  2. #12
    It looks like a fin from a whale.... I was not aware of the whales warp speed swimming capabilities! lol.
    I kid. so I work with prototyping machines... looks like your printing base to tip with an addative printing process.
    my experience is printing this method you have a weaker build as the layers are stacked ontop of one another, the fin will be bending along those build layers. sort of like prefolding a piece of paper before you rip it. but orienting the fin standing on its leading edge would make the layer vertically instead of horizontally which makes a stronger outter shell. Also abs will deform when used in a 3d printer. The MakerBot, while somewhat limited, uses pla which does not deform.
    Im interested to see how your results continue.... btw how much are you charging for fins, $250,000?
    ok ok... enough schtick, thanks for posting something of interest!

  3. #13
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    I don't know anything about the tech, but two obvious and big advantages are the accuracy of the product and the ability to replicate. Materials would be the next question... although even ABS would be suitable for the kind of forces a fin is subjected to on Roy's boards.

  4. #14
    Which 3D printer are you using?

    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Stuart View Post
    We've tested the weaker ABS version to destruction and the strength is fine, so the polycarbonate should be also.

    We are also getting laser sintered titanium versions done and they will be just about indestructible.

    The printer has much higher specs than home printers like the maker bot, the chamber is heated to increase strength and eliminate distortion.

    By the way printing 'around cloth' would be completely pointless as most of the strength is in the skins and the cloth would be on the neutral axis where it would contribute almost nothing.

  5. #15
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    I tried asking him that and he didn't answer

    Also, I have made molds of WAVESET fins and they were too weak, (even using composites that are used to make propellers)

    the fins were strong 'enough' once I put a sheet of cloth in the mold and then poured it

    also, it would be great to hear about the methodology of 'tested to destruction'

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by MFitz73 View Post

    It looks like a fin from a whale.... I was not aware of the whales warp speed swimming capabilities! lol.
    We've had excellent results with the BLEF foils, the fins can be done with a conventional leading edge also. It's all easily customisable as you know.



    I kid. so I work with prototyping machines... looks like your printing base to tip with an addative printing process.
    my experience is printing this method you have a weaker build as the layers are stacked ontop of one another, the fin will be bending along those build layers. sort of like prefolding a piece of paper before you rip it. but orienting the fin standing on its leading edge would make the layer vertically instead of horizontally which makes a stronger outer shell.
    Yes we are aware of that possible issue, however are using a printer with a heated chamber which improves the bond strength.

    We've tested an ABS fin to destruction and the layers are well bonded, the strength appears to be sufficient, based on our estimates of the forces on the fin during surfing.

    Next the polycarbonate is going under the 'hammer' it should be about 50% stronger.

    Printing horizontally is obviously easier for the machine and does give microgrooves in the direction of the water flow, something we've been after since '99.

    We also have a laser sintered titanium option, titanium fins will be at least twice as strong as glass and resin fins, and will float.

    The ultimate material is probably graphene but we'll have to wait for that. My aim is to 3d print the entire board in graphene.



    Also abs will deform when used in a 3d printer. The MakerBot, while somewhat limited, uses pla which does not deform.

    The ABS fins we've printed are very nice and are probably strong enough, they are very accurate and there is no detectable deformation. We are not using a home desktop printer.

    PLA is too weak.


    Im interested to see how your results continue.... btw how much are you charging for fins, $250,000?
    ok ok... enough schtick, thanks for posting something of interest!
    All good.

    Price wise an 8" polycarbonate singlefin will be over $100, there's more to doing t than meets the eye but hopefully it will become cheaper. from a business point of view upgrading of printers to the next level has to be factored in to the price also, and it's not yet quite as simple as pressing the button and walking away, although it's getting there.

    Laser sintered titanium in the same 8" fin will be around $1500 per fin, we can do up to 10.5" fins with a tab for fin box.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roy Stuart View Post

    We also have a laser sintered titanium option, titanium fins will be at least twice as strong as glass and resin fins, and will float.
    Please please go into detail and provide info and links. I am all over this stuff and Id like to see how this laser sinerting is cost feasible or available now

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post

    I don't know anything about the tech, but two obvious and big advantages are the accuracy of the product and the ability to replicate. Materials would be the next question... although even ABS would be suitable for the kind of forces a fin is subjected to on Roy's boards.
    You'd be surprised at the force which my bigger fins generate, especially the BLEF foils which have high lift coefficients at high angles of attack. It looks cruisy but can be knee buckling at times.

    Also the polycarbonate fins will be going in our new range of EPS foam based mid length boards, so will be subjected to a fair bit more in terms of angle of attack

    Calculating the forces by rule of thumb is easy to do but it's harder to know how accurate the calculations are, in the water testing will be the best method, as it always is.

    The accuracy is pretty astounding. We can apply a particular foil shape and it is reproduced everywhere on the fin, the current RAE102 has a hollow trailing edge which is really difficult to reproduce by hand, but comes out spot on with the printer. We can swap the foil for a different one at any time.

    We have some pretty far out fins coming up, for example a 'recurve' fin which is an updated version of our bulb tipped flex fins used with tunnels, and looks somewhat like one of Bobby Owens' gull wing type fin ( I had one in the late 70's).

    Then there will be tunnel fins with FCS tabs. The tabs for a 5 to 6" tunnel will also be able to take quad rear sets, they'll have no toe in. There's no issue with strength when making tunnels as the shape is so stable.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by MakeItStop View Post
    Please please go into detail and provide info and links. I am all over this stuff and Id like to see how this laser sinerting is cost feasible or available now
    Laser sintered fins are available now ( well in the next week as drawings for the internal structure have to be completed.

    Cost is high, due to the expense of the machine. No one with a 2 million dollar machine is gong to run it for peanuts. Not worrying about the expense though means that one is free to actually do it, which is a blast!

    If you have a particular shape you'd like and a couple of k to blow let me know. You'll be able to pass the fin down to future generations no doubt.

    The laser sintering is also much more accurate, could even be gold plated for those who like to attract sea life or want a wall hanger. the laser sintered surface is matte like shark skin, which is nice, the fin can also be tumbled polished or finished with high gloss clear coating.

  10. #20
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    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases...1202171920.htm

    thanks for info Roy, here is some more too