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Thread: Beater Board?

  1. #31
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by willeyboards View Post
    No video footage yet, just some pics. Just started make the cork top boards this month. I can add fcs plugs to the standard answer boards also. If your local to the ocean city md area, just give me a shout and id be happy to let you borrow one to demo. - Grab your Willey and Get Wet!

    www.willeysurfboards.com
    appreciate the info - i'm interested but i have several hundred other questions, like this one: i'm all for sustainability, but i passed on cork flooring for my home because i found i could pick it apart with my fingernail, thereby raising questions about it's durability. if you just started making the cork tops recently, do you have any idea how they are going to hold up after 1-2-3 years?

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by beerndwata View Post
    Anyone that says they "used to surf" never really did in the first place.
    By the end of August, everyone in New England used to surf up until a few months ago.

  3. #33
    I think they're good they can take a good beating, make sure they have removable fins though and I'd suggest a tri incase you really wanna start to surf. A beater is hard to turn though

  4. #34
    Ok. I have one (single fin Catch Surf Beater Board) and this is my review.
    Responsiveness: very. I like it for skating down little waves and such. Don't use the fins. If the wave is too big to ride w/o the fins use a real board. Reason being is that the fin(s) make it stiff and slow it down more than anything. I can also do shuv it's and 360s with no fin.
    Shape/use: weird subject, I know. The bottom channels help with holding power and speed, and the foam top is just SO much fun cuz it doesn't hurt if u botch a trick. Since they are small they are easy to turn, very skatey.
    Ok so that's all I've got... Really a simple board, good for the really little groms. Also, I talked to Catch Surf and they are doing pro models for the whole team. They're going to have new graphics and fin boxes that hold ANY futures or fcs fins. I like the whole thing... Don't know about y'all.
    Last edited by Southsidesurfer; Jan 19, 2014 at 05:45 PM.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    Ocean City, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by hanna View Post
    appreciate the info - i'm interested but i have several hundred other questions, like this one: i'm all for sustainability, but i passed on cork flooring for my home because i found i could pick it apart with my fingernail, thereby raising questions about it's durability. if you just started making the cork tops recently, do you have any idea how they are going to hold up after 1-2-3 years?
    Very good question. Ive been using cork on surfboards for about 2 years, and yes raw cork is easily picked apart, but I am infusing the cork with a layer of epoxy and fiberglass underneath. No way any cork will chip off if that happens. Also, cork will not break down in salt water and sun. Cork fishing rod handles have been used for hundreds of years.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    I've been playing around shaping a 4'10" bodyboard inspired creation myself. Paint will eventually be orange bottom/yellow deck tribute to the early '80s Mach 7-7 for anyone else unfortunate to be old enough to remember.

    Hoping with the channels it can be ridden with or without the fins. If you see any old guys spinning in circles next summer, that might just be me








  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by willeyboards View Post
    Very good question. Ive been using cork on surfboards for about 2 years, and yes raw cork is easily picked apart, but I am infusing the cork with a layer of epoxy and fiberglass underneath. No way any cork will chip off if that happens. Also, cork will not break down in salt water and sun. Cork fishing rod handles have been used for hundreds of years.
    so how would someone who is interested in buying one from you get something visual (other than a picture of the board leaning up against a fence on your website) to help make a purchase decision?