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  1. #101
    luke ditella in nj rivals jesse hines's noel tow-ins in hatteras

    http://www.bombinmagazine.com/blog/?p=1632

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelly slater View Post
    luke ditella in nj rivals jesse hines's noel tow-ins in hatteras

    http://www.bombinmagazine.com/blog/?p=1632
    thats a solid double O !

  3. #103
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Long Beach
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    Lol

    I think that the arguing over East Coast size is hi-larious. I distinctly remember storms coming up the coast in the late 80's/early 90s (and some mid 90s - more in the early) that produced swell that was double OH to around 12', but nothing more. Sure, it makes me sound old - but "you should have been here yesterday". There definitely have been storms after that have produced sizable swell - Noel being the most recent. However, even Noel around here was maxing out at 8 feet.

    Now with all of the "beach replenishment" and other ACOE work, some of our breaks close out at head high.

  4. #104
    Quote Originally Posted by jimbo_robinson View Post
    I would have to say the biggest day is back on december 12 1979 when I was surfing jaws. It was somewhere from 25 to 30 foot, and I don't even know how big the face was. It was crazy.
    Yeah, I think I saw you in Riding Giants. Greg Noll was giving you props

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zippy View Post
    I think mine was hurricane Gloria up in NJ. As far as I remember it was double overhead but I could be wrong, just sticks out in my memory. I am no a fan of run for your life giant surf, much rather surf a perfect chest to head high wave any day than something where I am so afraid I'm gonna die I can't do much more than cruise.

    I agree with you I am no BIG wave surfer either. Yes...... i have been on DOH + but my ideal wave is perfect chest to head.

  6. #106
    Quote Originally Posted by CurtFlirt732 View Post
    Second Iam calling bull**** on OC marylant getting 15' and rideable with how the place is set up with all the jettys it would get to walled up for that side and doubt any spot can hold it with the exception of maybe IRI and lets be real if it was 15 feet there would be a ****load of photogs out shooting everyone ripping it up where is your proof
    No doubt...
    OC, MD washes out and becomes unridable at about 8 foot, as does delaware. Everyone around here knows that. This shot of Northside IRI during Ernesto looks to be about 8 foot (and looking like its starting to close out there as well) and everybody from OC was up there thzat saturday...why? because OC was a couple feet bigger and unridable. Those claiming 15' - 17' need to learn how to measure a wave properly.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by CurtFlirt732 View Post
    you guys should all go back to school and learn how to measure a wave cause i bet 75% of you are either dumb or liars
    hah well so far in school they have never once gotten into the subject of wave measuring. it usually falls under the category of algebra, geometry, ceramics etc... but mayb u went to a special wave school =0.

    and for your 17 foot sess i totally believe you. naut. lets see, as a 10 year old you've outdone nearly all of the older experience surfers on here? it was entertaining, but a little insulting at the same time.

    ha this site is fun to bluff on though, isn't it bud?

  8. #108
    Quote Originally Posted by mikedub View Post
    I don't think people understand the size of waves there talking about, I seriously don't think an average mid-atlantic surfer/bodyboarder could make the paddle out to a 15+ foot wave. And if I'm if wrong about this which I could be, why don't I see you guys in surfline.

    I think there are differences between regions and wave height measurements. The east coast usually claims wave height by the face. The west coast and especially Hawaii count the back of the wave, to the top of the lip right before it breaks. Thats why you'll see the pros getting stand up barrels at chopes and describing the wave as 4-6 Ft.

    For example, I don't think any east coast break could handle a wave surfed at the Eddie. And those waves are considered to be 20+ ft, with a 40+ face.

  9. #109
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
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    Ocean City, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by South Bethany View Post
    No doubt...
    OC, MD washes out and becomes unridable at about 8 foot, as does delaware. Everyone around here knows that. This shot of Northside IRI during Ernesto looks to be about 8 foot (and looking like its starting to close out there as well) and everybody from OC was up there thzat saturday...why? because OC was a couple feet bigger and unridable. Those claiming 15' - 17' need to learn how to measure a wave properly.
    Dude you got K-coast, Malibus and other places calling the size of the waves down here and im sure they wouldnt have there jobs if they didnt know how to give proper surf reports. and saying OC is unridable at about 8 foot isn't true either. Ive lived here for about half my life and im not gonna say plenty of times, but there has been a lot of good surf and some of it was over 8 for sure. Im just saying, when you have the best ppl in OC calling the surf report DOH+ (in reference to the May 14th day) i dont think they just make that up for the fun of it.

  10. #110
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    wave height measuring is pretty interesting.

    Under the DOH mark there seems to be a certain amount of machismo involved. For example, one might say, "it was a solid 4-6", when you have well overhead faces coming in.

    BUT, when the waves reach the 15-20ft+ mark, then all of a sudden the ruler comes out, and you are measuring every square centimeter.

    As for east coast, a lot of times, with our relatively shorter period swells, we are dealing with a peak, and then a smaller shoulder. Where the peak could be much bigger then the rest of the line. In comparison to the longer period ground swells common on the west coast, which more often have a solid wave face all the way down the line.