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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by baddy trailerpark View Post
    my secret spot ( i could tell you but then i would have to…..) is trashed. just ruined. pumping makes good beaches; less so or not at all for the surf….a large storm could turn this around.
    so heres to the winter storm i have officially named "MAYHEM."
    Let's have mayhem hit now and wash all the pipes that are pumping away hahahahah. All hair mayhem

  2. #12
    ****hail .....spellcheck

  3. #13
    Eveyrone relax. Maybe itll make it better. Monmouth county has about 8 gems of spots I could think of in about a ten block stretch. I dont think pumping sand is going to even make mother nature flinch, even so give it two three swells that will just break a little difference, then right back to normal. 18 million down the drain

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lewes, DE
    Posts
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    121
    It is the weather channel that is responsible for naming winter storms, although they took this idea from the Europeans who had been doing this due to the significant impact winter storms have in Europe.

    NOAA does not recognize these names. The Weather Channel claims to have done this to bring more awareness to the potential threats of winter storms, but I"m sure we can all agree its to hype up and bring more media attention.

    Back to the original topic, beach replenishment sucks. We are all too familiar in Delaware, where they destroyed most of our surfing. But, i have learned there are different ways to pump sand, and different types of sand to be pumped, which seems to greatly impact the influence the pumping has on the surf breaks. I'd recommend you get in touch with the local Surfrider and see what kind of influence and understand Surfrider has on the beach pumping. I know in Delaware, the Surfrider Org is intimately aware of the perils of replenishment and different policy pitfalls and options available, and they are in persistent dialogue with the policy makers.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    It is the weather channel that is responsible for naming winter storms, although they took this idea from the Europeans who had been doing this due to the significant impact winter storms have in Europe.

    NOAA does not recognize these names. The Weather Channel claims to have done this to bring more awareness to the potential threats of winter storms, but I"m sure we can all agree its to hype up and bring more media attention.

    Back to the original topic, beach replenishment sucks. We are all too familiar in Delaware, where they destroyed most of our surfing. But, i have learned there are different ways to pump sand, and different types of sand to be pumped, which seems to greatly impact the influence the pumping has on the surf breaks. I'd recommend you get in touch with the local Surfrider and see what kind of influence and understand Surfrider has on the beach pumping. I know in Delaware, the Surfrider Org is intimately aware of the perils of replenishment and different policy pitfalls and options available, and they are in persistent dialogue with the policy makers.
    My family actually stopped our summer family get together at Delaware beaches because of that and the fact it's happening to my area now is really devastating. As soon as I saw what happened yesterday I said to myself I'm joining surfrider. Thank you

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lewes, DE
    Posts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surfin_nj View Post
    My family actually stopped our summer family get together at Delaware beaches because of that and the fact it's happening to my area now is really devastating. As soon as I saw what happened yesterday I said to myself I'm joining surfrider. Thank you
    Beach replenishment isn't going to end, but I'm confident their are best practices that can benefit everyone, including surfers. Tourists like to play in the surf too, and having sandbars, in my opinion, makes it a better experience for everyone.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
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    1,310
    iv contacted surfrider in june right before they started replenishing my spot.didnt help at all,maybe I didn't speak to the right people,but nothing happened,replinishment is done,and the waves are gone.they just don't care about surfers in the northeast.certain countries passed laws forbidding pumping sand or turning a surfspot into a marina.thats why it sucks being a surfer in the northeast.in Australia,they pumped sand out at snapper and kirra to improve the wave quality,same thing in ca with Malibu.they prevented trestles from turning into a highway multiple times.and we cant stop a few bulldozers.id say if they wanted to turn bayhead into a port,they would do it without the slightest form of protesting.we tried to rally people before the summer to protest,nothing happened.i guess everyone don't care until its too late.i even tried contacting frank Pallone,who is the congressman who approved the whole replenishment,again nothing happened.if they would've left the sand how it was after sandy,theyd be having wct events in nj,pros from all over would want to surf the perfect sandy bottom breaks.that lasted 5 months.the only 5 months I actually witnessed world class waves in my backyard.now they are just regular waves with lots of closeouts

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
    Posts
    1,310
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    Beach replenishment isn't going to end, but I'm confident their are best practices that can benefit everyone, including surfers. Tourists like to play in the surf too, and having sandbars, in my opinion, makes it a better experience for everyone.
    I remember reading last summer,how the acoe said sandbars are dangerous for people.thats how people get sucked out in rips,and their goal was to remove them.sandbars actually save lives,when u know how to work with them.i seen regular civilians who don't know much about the ocean,get pulled out,and then they hit a sandbar and can stand up,catch their breath and swim in.no sandbar no wave

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Chadwick
    Posts
    1,306
    I lost my home for 4 1/2 months, and I was one of the first to move back here, where it's still a total disaster, yet because I only live here for surfing, I have to hope there's another monster storm, which is a really weird feeling... these total a-hole political douchebags called surfrider are a total waste of money for us here and always have been, as they do nothing for us and nothing for Hatteras, either, since they're more concerned about cal and other far-off lands. we'd need a real lobby group with real billions behind to ever see anything done, and I don't see the rich corporate scum nj surfers doing a thing, because they're really just kooks.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by hdebarrelkilla View Post
    Eveyrone relax. Maybe itll make it better. Monmouth county has about 8 gems of spots I could think of in about a ten block stretch. I dont think pumping sand is going to even make mother nature flinch, even so give it two three swells that will just break a little difference, then right back to normal. 18 million down the drain
    The did the first pumping in the late 90s. Most spots were ruined and it took years for them to come back. Now that many are finally showing again after Sandy they are ruining them again.
    They do come back but it takes a long time in most cases. It takes a lot more than 2-3 swells for them to come back. Monmouth Beach and Long Branch were never the same...7 presidents was ruined for many years. SEa Bright never came back because all the sand just keep moving north. ANd the Cove is nothing like it used to be in the 80s and 90s.
    I agree, it's still money down the drain because it doesn't stop a major storm like Sandy. If anything it just dumped all that sand on the streets