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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    East Coast
    Posts
    337
    I tried to repair a board last week. Unfortunately the ding repair did not work because I had to strip everything off of the board and sand it back down. I would definitely advise you wait for warmer weather or do as everybody else said, just put a sticker on it.

    I was trying to repair my board in my garage with a space heater but that did not keep it warm enough.

    Good luck and I hope you fix your board soon

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    yonder
    Posts
    173
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    I fixed some dings on one of my boards last month on a mostly sunny 50deg day and still needed to put it in my greenhouse after over an hour and still soft and tacky.
    Out of curiosity were you using UV poly with or without MEKP and surfacing wax? I know that when I haven't used surfacing wax or don't cover the ding with plastic wrap or wax paper, oxygen in the air will prevent the outside surface from curing.

    I've had no issues laminating with UV poly in cold temps (resin is kept warm beforehand), but I'm less inclined to use it on dings (especially with q-cell) unless I add a little MEKP to make sure it gets hard where the sun don't shine. But then you need heat to finish the cure.

    Sack, if you don't have the supplies to work with poly use a low VOC epoxy and go get some free cardboard at a bike shop. If you have a space heater you can build a box around the ding (and heater) and heat that area up to 80 - 100 degrees in a few minutes, and keep it at a constant temp until it's cured. Even with low VOC epoxy I won't use it in the house/basement and the box means I don't need to heat the whole garage.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BELMAR, NJ
    Posts
    1,748
    Images
    1
    It's going to be near 60 this Friday

    Most resin says on it that it will not cure above 40 and you will need more catalyst to set it off. Double what you would in 70 degrees.

    I would put a sticker on it until warmer weather or fix it in your basement

    Or just move to Belmar NJ

  4. #14
    Lots of good advice here, thank you! This board is PU, maybe epoxy would react differently. I will definitely invest in some aluminum foil tape for emergencies, that's a good idea, Spicoli. I just finished the repair and it actually looks pretty good, the board has a gloss coat which I wasn't able to fully restore (maybe I could later with a buffer?), but still is barely noticeable. Here's what I did:

    --Cleaned/sanded the area thoroughly and dug out the ding with a razor knife.
    --Heated the shed to tropical temperatures, at least compared to what it is outside. I have no idea how warm it was, but I worked in a t-shirt which was nice.
    --Used Suncure instead of Q-cell in case the temperature issue caused problems (I let the Suncure work its magic outside for maximum UV exposure). At least with this the hole was plugged and I could apply resin later. Although it was 35 degrees outside, the Suncure cured fine. Amazingly, the sun semi-popped out. I let cure for 25 minutes with plastic covering the ding to keep everything flush and to reduce sanding.
    -- I moved the board back inside and let it warm up again. At this point the ding was essentially watertight, but I wanted to make sure. I sanded and applied resin/fiberglass patches. I kept the door open for ventilation so I wouldn't start seeing colors...at least not more than usual.
    --I let this cure for a little over an hour. I sanded again and applied hot coat.
    --This cured for a few hours in my little hot box. I sanded multiple times and finished with a wet sanding with very fine sandpaper.

    The repair looks pretty good. It will definitely keep water out and I will most likely be the only one that notices it. Heat is your friend in this process, the small area I worked in was a definite advantage because I could make it so hot. The only casualty was a beer I left in the snow bank that froze...this was easily remedied.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    milton delaware
    Posts
    1,550
    Images
    270
    Quote Originally Posted by Erock View Post
    The uv resins still need to be warm to kick in any reasonable amount of time. I fixed some dings on one of my boards last month on a mostly sunny 50deg day and still needed to put it in my greenhouse after over an hour and still soft and tacky.
    That sounds like bad UV resin, at least I've never had that problem with UV cure resin. On a sunny, or even partly cloudy 50 degree day or even a few degrees colder the UV Cure resin I've used (Ding-all laminating resin) will be set up hard and sandable within 45 minutes or less.

    I have found some of those UV Cure products that squeeze out of a tube with the fiberglass filler a bit less predictable.
    Last edited by mitchell; Feb 19, 2014 at 01:34 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,340
    Quote Originally Posted by viajerodevida View Post
    Out of curiosity were you using UV poly with or without MEKP and surfacing wax? I know that when I haven't used surfacing wax or don't cover the ding with plastic wrap or wax paper, oxygen in the air will prevent the outside surface from curing.
    This time I was using UV epoxy and some plastic overlay--it was still blushing. Never had this problem in the summer, that's why I tossed it in the greenhouse--it's always summer in there.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,340
    Quote Originally Posted by mitchell View Post
    That sounds like bad UV resin, at least I've never had that problem with UV cure resin. On a sunny, or even partly cloudy 50 degree day or even a few degrees colder the UV Cure resin I've used (Ding-all laminating resin) will be set up hard and sandable within 45 minutes or less.

    I have found some of those UV Cure products that squeeze out of a tube with the fiberglass filler a bit less predictable.

    I used Phixdoctor this last time around. I've had it close to a year, so maybe it's turning.

  8. #18
    You guys ever use marine grade resins? Sometimes that's all I've got access to but I've refrained from it this far.

    Can't say enough about the usefulness of aluminum tape. Plus, it's a convo topic since few other are doing it.

  9. #19
    I typically do my repairs in the garage, with the door shut when it's cold out. I deal with the fumes in an eclosed space by wearing a respirator rated for organic fumes ($25.00 at home depot). To help ensure the resin will cure, I keep it in the house right up until I am ready to glass. That way it stays around 70 degrees and doesn't need a ton of catalyst. Lastly, I place a space heater in the garage close to where I am doing my work so that it keeps the surrounding air reasonably warm. Seems to work well for me, and my glass jobs are usually fully cured after a few hours...

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Wilmington
    Posts
    2,340
    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    You guys ever use marine grade resins? Sometimes that's all I've got access to but I've refrained from it this far.

    Can't say enough about the usefulness of aluminum tape. Plus, it's a convo topic since few other are doing it.
    Two words: West Systems.... although I've only used it on boats, but I think the general 505 would work pretty well but it may be softer after it cures. I think the biggest problem with marine resins is they discolor easily and don't usually cure to that crystal clear you want on a surfboard, plus they tend to blush more iirc.

    I'm about to go get me some Green Room resin to glass some of these hand boards I've shaped out of foam. They're reportedly some of the best in the business and they're Wilmington boys.