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  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by baddy trailerpark View Post
    if you are a front foot surfer and choose instead to be a back foot surfer, well, spend
    5 or 10 sessions on a sb single fin. its possible that if one applies what they learn here to
    a standard hpsb it could improve ones' performance.
    I hear that's great for your surfing.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by baddy trailerpark View Post
    if you are a front foot surfer and choose instead to be a back foot surfer, well, spend
    5 or 10 sessions on a sb single fin. its possible that if one applies what they learn here to
    a standard hpsb it could improve ones' performance.
    surfing a single fin is also a good way to learn how to PROPERLY turn a shortboard...w/ the rail.

  3. #13
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    single fin sb's

    Quote Originally Posted by njsurfer42 View Post
    surfing a single fin is also a good way to learn how to PROPERLY turn a shortboard...w/ the rail.
    i always liked a good single fin. the only thing i didn't like about them was how much better
    the standard hpsb went (you know , simons' child - da thruster). other than that i like 'em.

  4. #14
    no such thing as "front footed or back footed surfers". You need to throw your weight back and forth to and from both feet to surf properly.

    Its an out of date saying that was once used in the '70's (b/c of board design and abad way to describe the differing styles) but has been hanging around archaically for no reason at all.

    If you're either front or back, you're not doing it right.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by baddy trailerpark View Post
    i always liked a good single fin. the only thing i didn't like about them was how much better
    the standard hpsb went (you know , simons' child - da thruster). other than that i like 'em.
    still fun to mix it up & get on one from time to time. i keep one in the quiver for just that reason...it's nice to change pace from time to time. it's also so easy to get into bad habits surfing just a thruster all the time, getting on a single fin is kind of like a reset button.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    whats a front foot surfer?i don't get it.your either regular,left foot forward,or goofy with your right foot forward.

    the front foot tho plays an important role in surfing.from pumping through barrels or setting up your turns,the front foot guides you,and your back foot is the pressure cooker that u punch through the lip as u turn.watch footage of the hobgoods and they literally ride on their noses.

    u want to stall,u do the tom carrol wheelie.u want to go fast,put more weight on your front foot and pump.want to do a wicked carve,hit that lip and push as hard as u could with the backfoot.for airs,u want to pump on the front foot and hit the section doing an Ollie,like on a skateboard.thats why skaters are the best aerialists.the front foot is the most crucial thing to progressive surfing.if u keep all ur weight on the backfoot,u will go nowhere and the wave will knock u right off.

    in other news,anyone selling a wide 6'6'' or 6'8''.i normally ride a 6'2'' which comes up to my chin for some reason,im 6 ft so idk.iv put on some weight and the 6'2'' aint working how it should when I was 30lbs lighter

  7. #17
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    just listen to ian walsh describe the hobgoods in te first minute

  8. #18
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    Nov 2007
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    There can be no doubt that riding alternative shapes, wide, flat etc requires more of a weight forward or front foot weighted approach to get the board going and to keep it going. You do still need to go to the tail and the rail to carve a turn. I have a few boards that refuse to go unless your weighted heavily forward and a few that refuse to go unless your applying more neutral pressure front to back. All do require heel and toe pressure on the tail to turn.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Ocean City
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    I guess you just need to make sure that you are weighted out correctly. Like cepriano said, each foot has its own job. Obviously you can't just go and stand straight up with equal weight. You need to pick the right time. Longboarding taught me that (longboarding on concrete, that is). It's all repetition and muscle memory. And always going ham on every wave...

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Zippy View Post
    There can be no doubt that riding alternative shapes, wide, flat etc requires more of a weight forward or front foot weighted approach to get the board going and to keep it going. You do still need to go to the tail and the rail to carve a turn. I have a few boards that refuse to go unless your weighted heavily forward and a few that refuse to go unless your applying more neutral pressure front to back. All do require heel and toe pressure on the tail to turn.
    You're more talking planing. Of course a wide, thick board requires front foot pressure WHILE PLANING. But see what happens when you use your front foot on that board to execute a steep carve or hack, or even an aggressive cut back for that matter. The pros call it parallel weight shift: pulling or pushing your weight front to back along the stringer depending on the part of the maneuver.

    There's just no way your doing anything more than minor fades and climbs with primarily your front foot.