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  1. #81
    mrcoop, got any new vids of your progress? You must be murdering your streets by now after seeing what you were putting on them in a matter of days bro. The quality of your laybacks prompted me to work on mine and in two weeks I've upped my game on those a ton.

    A bunch of you cats over the months have talked about when you reach this critical point of surfing progress you now start to get A LOT better very quickly. That's recently happened with my Carver skills. The best part is that the more skilled you get on the Carver, the more of a surfboard feel it becomes in all ways. Would you guys say the key to surfing progress is being able to find the speed in the wave and use it to full benefit? Because that's what I would have to point to as the impetus for my Carver improvements as of late - I'm creating, conserving, and not destroying (by zig-zag/tic-tac) my speed and energy which therefore allows me to make a 10 degree incline of smoother pave serve as a clean chest-high wave.

    I can't get enough of it. Between quick lunch breaks from working during the day then my evening pave rip then my late night clear street sesh, I get about 2-4 hours a day back in EMass and that's been in 12-32 degrees for months. When I'm out west, I don't stop. The swell here has been less than impressive the last several days, so I've just hammered the Carver endlessly. I'm talking 8 hours on Saturday total including 5.5 straight at Honeyton. Then on Sunday surfed for 3 and ripped pave I think for 5. And hard the whole time too, not this "cruising" crap. Pumping for full speed, then treating the street like it's sections and then hacking multiple maneuvers on it and repeat the other way.

    If there's an equivalent of throwing buckets on pavement, then I'm heaving gravel by the ton during sessions now. Every street or lot or post or bench is a wave, section, obstacle, and purposeful instrument in my surf training. I've really loosened up the whole body during pumps and maneuvers on the pave and that single-handedly gave me some of my most fluent and controlled wave rides ever out on the water on Sunday. Staying loose throughout the whole takeoff and drop, then banging down the line stat, then finding speed to make the section and complete the section then ride off the shoulder when the wave ends. Simple rides to full completion with smoother execution throughout is something new to me.

    I've always known that more skillful movement patterns actually contain less movement and tension than less skillfully executions of the same movement patterns. However, I'm finally feeling seamless at all times on the Carver and now that's transferring to some seamlessness on the wave.

    Most notable changes as of late: greater compression/extension/re-compression and reliance on changing levels and height throughout a ride and maneuvers, sending my speed on a linear path at all times towards where I want to go rather than zig-zagging (what onlookers would call "wiggling" when you're not up to speed on the Carver yet), improved arm placement and movement prior to and throughout maneuvers front and back, weighting on front foot for drive, weighting on rail strategically rather than excessively (transferring weight to flatter ball of foot rather than side of foot than I'm turning, snapping, or trimming towards), bending back knee down and inward towards front leg when transferring weight and pivoting on instep/arch of back foot rather than always keeping it flat, and finally, throwing the whole body into movements fully without holding back.

    It's purposeful time on the pave that elevates your Carver (and therefore surf!) game just like it's purposeful time in the water for surfing. Find smoother pave, hit banks and slight ramps, throw snaps around obstacles into tail slides, and basically make the concrete/asphalt environment your bish. Go HAM the whole time, every time. There's no other way. I don't care how good you get either - if you don't eat schitt or at least have to do a hard runoff once or more in a session you're not gonna end that sesh a better charger.

    NOTE: Experiment with varying tensions in the spring bolt on the C7. This will have everything to do with the hold/looseness continuum not only on power moves but also in your generation of power for those moves during your pumps and trims. Don't go too long either without re-checking just how tight or loose you have it. I keep mine loose as hell on the 34" Green Room but gave it a twist again finally two nights ago and damn did that make all the difference. Know your gear and make the board an extension of your body. Zen, bro.

  2. #82
    image.jpg
    If you wanna really test your carver try skating a pool like I did or a good old fashioned bowl

  3. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    ...
    A bunch of you cats over the months have talked about when you reach this critical point of surfing progress you now start to get A LOT better very quickly. ...
    In most action sports that point is when you learn how to stop and how to fall gracefully. At this point you aren't as likely to go over the falls with your board upside down and 3/4/5 fins pointed at your crotch, you can slightly alter your course on a snowboard and miss the tree, or miss a light pole on your skate, or knee slide on a ramp. When you fall in big surf you relax and don't panic when you get held under because you know you will float to the top eventually.

    You need to put the hours in so you can make subtle adjustments in order to stop or to at least fall with a little bit of grace and not bang yourself up too bad. Once you reach this level you can try things that are a little harder and a little more sketchy 'cause you've reached the point where you can somewhat protect yourself when things go tits up. And, due to the time you've put in, you know when things are going bad much sooner than when you're a newb and you basically have sensory overload.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Rhody
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    Quote Originally Posted by ClemsonSurf View Post
    You definitely can. I was a little bit annoyed when I got one as a Christmas present from my wife but I did end up liking it. Let me know how yours works out.
    My son and I made our own "Goof Boards." Easy and cheap.

  5. #85
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rhody
    Posts
    167
    Quote Originally Posted by hanna View Post
    i think you're overly sensitive -nothing wrong with rollerblades at all. you can carve mightily on the right set of rollerblades. i'm in need of some new ones - i want the bigger wheels this time around (84 mm, i think) but nobody in my area sells them and i'm reluctant to buy them online. rollerbladeds are great cardio, low impact, load up an mp3 player with the right tunes and you're in business.

    meantime, when skateboarding got a little stale, i decided to learn how to ride these...that was two years ago and i'm still working on it, but if you can get the hang of it, they're a lot of fun:

    Dude, what are those things, I want them.

  6. #86
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rhody
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    167
    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Atom View Post
    Haha! It's so obvious that they're wearing some type of harness under their shirts. Focus on their shoulders...looks a bit suspicious!
    Well known hoax by Funny or Die.

  7. #87
    Quote Originally Posted by goosemagoo View Post
    In most action sports that point is when you learn how to stop and how to fall gracefully. At this point you aren't as likely to go over the falls with your board upside down and 3/4/5 fins pointed at your crotch, you can slightly alter your course on a snowboard and miss the tree, or miss a light pole on your skate, or knee slide on a ramp. When you fall in big surf you relax and don't panic when you get held under because you know you will float to the top eventually.

    You need to put the hours in so you can make subtle adjustments in order to stop or to at least fall with a little bit of grace and not bang yourself up too bad. Once you reach this level you can try things that are a little harder and a little more sketchy 'cause you've reached the point where you can somewhat protect yourself when things go tits up. And, due to the time you've put in, you know when things are going bad much sooner than when you're a newb and you basically have sensory overload.
    Very well said bro, thank you. I fully agree on the vast increase in sensory input absorption the greater you go on experience and skill. I've seen this happen with all my other athletics, although surfing is happening FAST for a long time when you're starting out. It's great when you find yourself in a full-speed situation but have the "ok, I've been here before" feeling and I swear just staying loose and not tightening up helps a lot.

    True dat on the spills. I know how to fall and get hit in several sports without getting hurt, yet again, surfing and skating is often much more dynamic at speed, especially surfing with terrain that's forever morphing. When I started on the Carver, I'd hit a rut or rock and fall forward right onto my lead hip and also the base of my palm. I've got pretty strong bones and my upper body is adept at cushioning a fall that I break with my hand, yet it's never gonna be my first choice to land with impact on a palm or hip or similar.

    I feel like I'm falling as a stunt man would these days as I'm not feeling much impact when I eat it hard despite my speed on the board being double or more now on any given maneuver or hill carve than earlier in my progression. When goose just mentioned getting thrown under water, it's very parallel. The non-resistance to where our body is going is what keeps us safer and smoother. I've also noticed I can stabilize all types of wobble and lack of traction now by staying loose, and pumping and snapping on beach boardwalks with sand all over them take away a lot of your traction.

    What intrigues me is seeing how my style is evolving given no prior skate background, both for my Carver riding and surf. Take mrcoop for example, braddah hops on a Carver and in days he's tearing crete like he made the wheel round. You can see certain movement patterns emerge from his skate days and those are both pure and helpful to the Carver. I'll never have those in the pure sense - as I continue to integrate some regular skate work in on my PP deck with CX truck, it'll still have the underlying imprint of all my motor learning this far on a surfboard and Carver. Just the same, I've noticed from the start that there's some skate movement patterns and habits that inhibit quality flow on a Carver or surfboard.

    I think it's the cerebellum of our brains that can reactivate prior motor learning from years ago. Did that when I got back on a snowboard this year for the first time in a decade and a half and it's far cooler to see you skate rats reactivate your skills from yesteryear.

    As I wrote this, mrcoop just authored the alley-coop move on the Carver.

  8. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post

    Take mrcoop for example,

    braddah hops on a Carver and in days he's tearing crete like he made the wheel round
    Haha! Great quote. Too bad we can't have signatures on this board.

  9. #89
    Quote Originally Posted by goosemagoo View Post
    Haha! Great quote. Too bad we can't have signatures on this board.
    Hahaha ya breh, it was square before mrcoop changed the game.

    I thought we could have siggies - didn't rcarter have one or did he MANUAL that in there?

  10. #90
    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    It's a lot different man. It's still a Carver in the good ways and pure uniqueness but it's a lot closer to a regular skate truck than the C7. Much stiffer than the C7, although all of the trucks can be loosened on the two bolts worth adjusting (don't touch bushings). You start defeating the purpose of the CX when you loosen it more than stock.
    .
    I'm guessing you don't actually own the new CX.4? If not, its very different than the older incarnations...