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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    You Know, ME
    Posts
    22
    I ride a Mark Richards Flyin' Fish at 7'6". Its a beast and can glide on those summer ankle biters. I kind of wish it were one of the 6'6" but it was my first board so I went bigger to make it a little easier on me.

  2. #12
    I got stuck renting a 7s superfish xl in la jolla once, I think it was a 7'4 or something. Surprisingly fun on lined up chest high surf, but, what isn't?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Atlantic City
    Posts
    1,377

    Lightbulb not sure??

    try before buy.
    go ahead smear it w/wax...

  4. #14
    Why are people calling $hit like this "simmons" does anyone even know what's up with the og simmons model? They're short (5'-6') twin fins. NOT thrusters, and definitely NOT greater than 6'. if you're going to ride a fish that tall, it oughta be a twinnie to still kick the tail when desired. that board could be fun but you've got all the wrong titles on it. I think the one dude nailed it in calling it a very nicely glassed fun board. and nothing more. It's cool . . . if you're into fun boards.

  5. The original simmons were 9'6" to 10ft + & made in the 50's by Bob Simmons. Everything now of days using the name simmons refers to boards that have design traits that can be traced back to Bob's original board. The Mini Simmons of today take the design pricinples of bob's work & apply it to a smaller version. The first mini shaped by Joe Bauguss for Richard Kenvin is a true mini simmons taking most of its elements from Bob's early boards. You can have a simmons influenced board of any length does have to be short.

    This board was designed to trim & be turned off the tail. Ideal conditions for a board like this to excel would be stomach high & above and on a nice point break where it could be ridden off the tail. Riding it in 2ft surf wouldn't do this board any justice. Guys like Joel Tudor or Devon Howard have plenty of midlengths in their quiver & they are designed to be ridden in certain conditions only, similar to this board. If that what you are looking for then go for it.

  6. #16
    This would be a do not buy in my opinion. There are way too many other crafts that would be just as much or more fun on the type of days you are planning to use this. It looks a little gimmicky for my taste. But if you were drawing some nice long lines on a 8-10 foot face, this might be the magic stick. You would need some weight to get the nice fishy leaned back turns on this bad boy. Plus I'm not too into resin tints, they look weird and heavier(though they are not heavier) to me.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Charleston
    Posts
    1,143
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by KelliSlhater View Post
    The original simmons were 9'6" to 10ft + & made in the 50's by Bob Simmons. Everything now of days using the name simmons refers to boards that have design traits that can be traced back to Bob's original board. The Mini Simmons of today take the design pricinples of bob's work & apply it to a smaller version. The first mini shaped by Joe Bauguss for Richard Kenvin is a true mini simmons taking most of its elements from Bob's early boards. You can have a simmons influenced board of any length does have to be short.

    This board was designed to trim & be turned off the tail. Ideal conditions for a board like this to excel would be stomach high & above and on a nice point break where it could be ridden off the tail. Riding it in 2ft surf wouldn't do this board any justice. Guys like Joel Tudor or Devon Howard have plenty of midlengths in their quiver & they are designed to be ridden in certain conditions only, similar to this board. If that what you are looking for then go for it.
    Preach! This is true. We're only focusing on a small part of Simmons' work lately but his main ideas were planing hulls, concave, relatively flat profile, squared off tail and twin fins set on or near the tail. There's an article from a '94 Surfer's Journal called The Enigma of Simmons. I've got a pdf but I can't remember where I found it.

    The only comparable features this board has to a Simmons is the full concave.

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by garbanzobean View Post
    You must be an enormous dude to even think about riding that monster fish. You would have to be real heavy and have to stand directly over the inside rail to hold it down on a hard bottom turn. Why the thruster set up on a big trim style board? Highly doubt that it will be ridden hard top to bottom off the tail like a thruster. If you are a 280lb. guy and you have to have a godzilla fish I would suggest getting glassed on twin keels aimed real close to parallel and lose the hip in the outline to benefit trim speed. I can't help but think where that beast wants to be is high trim on clean surf with drawn out turns, very limited to down the line soft carves. IMHO. Why don't you post pictures of the side view? Concrete floors with swallow tail surfboards perched on them make my butt pucker. Please be nice to that girl, get her a soft place to rest.
    Nope...not enormous...5'11" and 165lbs. Further, I don't own the board--If I did Gar...it would be on a nice pillow against my wall ;-)...found it on Josh Hall's blog .

    As for why...I have loved surfing "fishes" of all sizes since I jumped off mid-lengths as a kid. Everything from twins, quads, etc. I have kept a custom Wynn 5'11" on ice for about the last 5 years just because of how incredible it was...only ride it when necessary. Consequently, I'm interested in a lot of different boards--I like the idea of the "ride anything" movement--within reason. However, I always go back to a fish at any point--however, surfing the jetty at a full tide in the summer with a weak wind swell...well...I'll go for the glide rather then the incessant pumping and struggling of a smaller fish.

    Consequently, I see this design as something that I would be familiar with--that is, ride similar to other fish...work in the smaller surf. However, such is the reason I ask...if we had a few points around here I would even consider one of those huge frye eagle...or something similar.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by beerndwata View Post
    Why are people calling $hit like this "simmons" does anyone even know what's up with the og simmons model? They're short (5'-6') twin fins. NOT thrusters, and definitely NOT greater than 6'. if you're going to ride a fish that tall, it oughta be a twinnie to still kick the tail when desired. that board could be fun but you've got all the wrong titles on it. I think the one dude nailed it in calling it a very nicely glassed fun board. and nothing more. It's cool . . . if you're into fun boards.
    I think you're confusing the simmons with a true fish. In which theres a few schools of thought, i however stick to the Lis Fish as being the standard as do most fish enthusiasts. The dims of the Lis are pretty strict at under 6', no less than 21" wide, a tail of at least 11" at the points, and the swallow cut being at least 5" deep.

    The idea behind the larger fishes is they are taking the proportions of the smaller fishes and applying them to the larger models with the appropriate adjustments.