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  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Grommet, the tides in Rhodey are nearly sea level on the reg. High there today is 3ft. Three. Low is 0. What are you talking about grommet? Put your cell piece away in study hall before it gets confiscated.

    FYI, I'm talking about tide differential here boys. If a rock reef is relatively exposed to da max all day long in some form then so be it, that's simple and you plan accordingly. But when it comes out of nowhere in 15-30 minutes on the polar end of a tide change, you're surfing a whole different break now.

    The tide differential on a gnarly full moon day in Maine is 5x more drastic than Rhodey is today. Consider that. These are single and double-digit math problems people. Not trig or calc.
    I go there every summer. And I don't even own a phone.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Grommet, the tides in Rhodey are nearly sea level on the reg. High there today is 3ft. Three. Low is 0. What are you talking about grommet? Put your cell piece away in study hall before it gets confiscated.

    FYI, I'm talking about tide differential here boys. If a rock reef is relatively exposed to da max all day long in some form then so be it, that's simple and you plan accordingly. But when it comes out of nowhere in 15-30 minutes on the polar end of a tide change, you're surfing a whole different break now.

    The tide differential on a gnarly full moon day in Maine is 5x more drastic than Rhodey is today. Consider that. These are single and double-digit math problems people. Not trig or calc.
    What are you doing? Called a sick day or something?

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by RIsurfer View Post
    What are you doing? Called a sick day or something?
    Yes grommet. I call today a sick day because I'll be charging Pacific waves.

    Since you go to ME each summer, pay attention to the tides when you're up there as they're not the same as the breaks you regularly visit.

    Now get off your iPad or laptop and focus on your teacher's lecture. Or go BS with grommet 2.0

  4. #14
    probably one of the last places on the East Coast to be explored to its full potential. i've heard stories from guys that worked on lobster boats of full-on reef setups that fire, but very very fickle. go check it out and keep the good news to yourself.

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by salt View Post
    probably one of the last places on the East Coast to be explored to its full potential. i've heard stories from guys that worked on lobster boats of full-on reef setups that fire, but very very fickle. go check it out and keep the good news to yourself.
    Correct and the more northern the better.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Maine
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    Southern, ME in normal conditions is pretty mello. Lots of beach breaks south of Portland. In the late spring, summer and early fall the breaks will be crowded on weekends, but probably not as crowded as points further south. Once mid-October rolls around the crowds disappear. On an awesome day in winter you might have four other people in with you.

    When I first started living and surfing up here I immediately noticed you get much longer rides on small days when compared to the Outer Banks (my only other point of reference). I don't know the science, but I believe it's a continental shelf thing? Anyway, the beaches are very gradual so you rarely see shore break when it's knee high +. A longboard is a must-have, but I suppose that's true anywhere.

    So where ya moving to?

  7. #17
    I'm curious, in general is the tide differential greater the farther north you go from the equator?

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by goosemagoo View Post
    I'm curious, in general is the tide differential greater the farther north you go from the equator?
    I don't have a clue either. I know there was a big tide change in Costa Rica on the Pacific side the last time I was in Dominical. I lost my board way outside, and as I was bodysurfing back in, I noticed boulders flying by just below me that were nowhere to be seen an hour before. Someone on this forum may have some real science to share. I know the moon has something to do with it.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    I don't think the tide differential is necessarily due to latitude. I read somewhere that because of it's proximity to the continental shelf and the Georgia bight or bend in the coastline, that Georgia has some of the biggest tide differentials on the east coast next to Maine.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    Maine
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    Quote Originally Posted by pdub View Post
    I don't think the tide differential is necessarily due to latitude. I read somewhere that because of it's proximity to the continental shelf and the Georgia bight or bend in the coastline, that Georgia has some of the biggest tide differentials on the east coast next to Maine.
    If you're at a beach break there's really nothing to fear. Aside from a couple minor rips and side currents I haven't had any surprising experiences. Oh, there was that seal that popped up 10 ft in front of me. That was surprising.