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  1. #21
    Thanks for the info. Are you guys wearing wetsuits all year. Water temps ever get in board short range for summer? Looks like this Sunday you will get some waist + . Let me know how it is.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by goosemagoo View Post
    I'm curious, in general is the tide differential greater the farther north you go from the equator?
    Short answer: no. No expert here by any means but I've been trying to understand tides for a while now. So many factors are involved that it usually makes my head spin when I study it. For now I am content to be familiar with the tides effecting my local area.

    Essentially tides are driven by the gravitational effects of the moon's orbit of the earth and to a lesser extent that of the sun. That is why most of us experience two high and two low tides per day at a period of roughly 12 hours and 25 minutes. However, some places only experience one high and one low tide per day. Still haven't grasped that one.

    The tide differential is more related to bathymetry though I imagine lattitude could have some effect as well. By bathymetry I mean more than just the under water ocean floor contours that we usually think of but also the effect of other land masses and the interconnection of other bodies of water. Basically anything that effects the movement of water so I suppose you could also include ocean currents and winds into the mix.

    As you can see there are a ton of factors involved. That is why all tide charts are really forecasts and shouldn't be considered absolute values. Interesting stuff but I still can't get my head around it all. Here's a neat chart I found on Wikipedia that shows the extremeness of tides around the world and the text that accompanied it. You can see one of the hot spots of extreme variation is on the Pacific coast of Central America as sisurfdogg experienced.

    M2_tidal_constituent.jpg
    The M2 tidal constituent. Amplitude is indicated by color, and the white lines are cotidal differing by 1 hour. The curved arcs around the amphidromic points show the direction of the tides, each indicating a synchronized 6-hour period. Tidal ranges generally increase with increasing distance from amphidromic points. The colors indicate where tides are most extreme (highest highs, lowest lows), with blues being least extreme. In almost a dozen places on this map the lines converge. Notice how at each of these places the surrounding color is blue, indicating little or no tide. These convergent areas are called amphidromic points. Tide waves move around these points, counterclockwise in the N. Hemisphere and clockwise in the S. Hemisphere
    Another thing about tides I hadn't thought of until I recently read "Waves and Beaches" by Willard Bascom is that tides are indeed waves and they are the longest period waves that we experience on a regular basis at about 12.5 hours. BTW, this is an excellent book for those wanting to learn more about waves and stuff. It is long out of print but pretty easy to find.

    Sorry to continue derailing this thread but at least I'm not blathering on about avatars...

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by goosemagoo View Post
    I'm curious, in general is the tide differential greater the farther north you go from the equator?
    Easy answer bro! The Creator is a surfer and wants to keep the dope breaks at the equator going off the same 24/7!!

    Anywayz, the much lower tide difference at the equator is primarily due to the relationship of the earth's equatorial plane and the orbital plane of the moon. Tides themselves are affected by many factors, including coastline, bathymetry, and continental shelf, as well as where the sun and the moon reside specific to a given region.

    Largest tides in the world are in Nova Scotia and Maine is pretty damn close and also has a lot of the same similarities with these factors.

    There are solar tides and lunar tides, so the moon is not the only guiding force at work here. If the moon disintegrates tomorrow or is blown up by a meteor, we will still experience solar tides although much smaller since now those two celestial beings aren't working in concert.

    The moon and the earth are basically playing tug of war with the earth's water and since the moon's upward pull is greater, we get the lunar effect on tides.

    Little known fact: The Great Lakes have tides, but only a few inches so it's basically considered non-tidal.

  4. #24
    Woah. Valhalla and I posted the same thing just about at the same time. That's either creepy or brilliant.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by SurfLIs View Post
    Thanks for the info. Are you guys wearing wetsuits all year. Water temps ever get in board short range for summer? Looks like this Sunday you will get some waist + . Let me know how it is.
    Yes, bro. You can trunk it in July and August if there's any swell to be found. Only went up there for a couple waist high days last summah but they were loads of fun. It's a few degrees colder water than MA but still gets up there finally in later summah. Don't mind the locals (every one of them) that are in their 3/2s in 70 degree water in packs of 50 sitting on their boards at Gooch's waiting for no waves. Rock the baggies bro.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Mad Atom View Post
    If you're at a beach break there's really nothing to fear. Aside from a couple minor rips and side currents I haven't had any surprising experiences. Oh, there was that seal that popped up 10 ft in front of me. That was surprising.
    My initial posts in this thread weren't referencing beach breaks, but the reclusive spots that have some long, long paddles out.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Woah. Valhalla and I posted the same thing just about at the same time. That's either creepy or brilliant.
    I think it is a little bit of both, my friend. Kinda like how zaGaffer and Steamy Ray show up on the same day. Just as the tides ebb and flow so does this forum...

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Yes, bro. You can trunk it in July and August if there's any swell to be found. Only went up there for a couple waist high days last summah but they were loads of fun. It's a few degrees colder water than MA but still gets up there finally in later summah. Don't mind the locals (every one of them) that are in their 3/2s in 70 degree water in packs of 50 sitting on their boards at Gooch's waiting for no waves. Rock the baggies bro.
    I used to like you, Spicoli, but I think you just trashed my home break! Ouch, dude. Let me set the record straight, the locals ain't the issue. It's the Quebecois and non-Maine New Englanders. The locals are good folks. Except for me, of course, I'm a friggin crazy wild a-hole so stay away from me.

    The water won't touch 70 degrees. There could be a couple days it gets close to that depending on currents, but you'll likely want that 3/2 most of the time. To avoid the crowds it's best to go early morning so that's another reason to sport the 3/2.

  9. #29
    Your tide theory is flawed.
    Tides for today.
    Norther Maine:
    low- -0.4'
    high- - 9.1'

    Hermosa CR:
    low - -0.2
    high - 9.1'

    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Easy answer bro! The Creator is a surfer and wants to keep the dope breaks at the equator going off the same 24/7!!

    Anywayz, the much lower tide difference at the equator is primarily due to the relationship of the earth's equatorial plane and the orbital plane of the moon. Tides themselves are affected by many factors, including coastline, bathymetry, and continental shelf, as well as where the sun and the moon reside specific to a given region.

    Largest tides in the world are in Nova Scotia and Maine is pretty damn close and also has a lot of the same similarities with these factors.

    There are solar tides and lunar tides, so the moon is not the only guiding force at work here. If the moon disintegrates tomorrow or is blown up by a meteor, we will still experience solar tides although much smaller since now those two celestial beings aren't working in concert.

    The moon and the earth are basically playing tug of war with the earth's water and since the moon's upward pull is greater, we get the lunar effect on tides.

    Little known fact: The Great Lakes have tides, but only a few inches so it's basically considered non-tidal.

  10. #30
    Thanks for the info. Pretty cool map too. I've always known they were mainly caused by the moon but couldn't figure out why some places were affected so much more.

    From the looks of the map it seems like the places with the biggest differential are near some type of choke point that would inhibit the movement of massive amounts of water. Almost like how a siphon works by "dragging" the larger mass of liquid behind the initial outflow.

    Sheesh, I'm sure there's better terms for what I was saying but I never made it to that class