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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    BELMAR, NJ
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    1,360
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    Belmar, NJ... best conditions

  2. #22
    bro, why would you ask such a question. Your location is mase brah. Best toobs on the east coast, never crowded and year round 80 degree water

  3. #23
    #justgotobelmar #s@ltlyfe #****inbelmartwice #belmarboardies #belmarkooks #wearebelmar #iownbelmar #offmywavekook

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Turtle Island
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    4,447
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    Don't forget:

    #belmarartificialreef

  5. #25
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lewes, DE
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    Right, not all beach breaks are bad at handling long period swells, but I'd say the majority of beach breaks will close out more with the longer period stuff due to the higher refraction.

    Pacific Beach in San Francisco - breaks in deep water with gradual slope.
    Puerto Escondido - actually is 90% close outs, and very dependent upon sand bar formation on any given day.

    Most East Coast beach breaks, will lean towards more high close outs. The higher the angle of the swell to the coast, the better off.

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    Right, not all beach breaks are bad at handling long period swells, but I'd say the majority of beach breaks will close out more with the longer period stuff due to the higher refraction.

    Pacific Beach in San Francisco - breaks in deep water with gradual slope.
    Puerto Escondido - actually is 90% close outs, and very dependent upon sand bar formation on any given day.

    Most East Coast beach breaks, will lean towards more high close outs. The higher the angle of the swell to the coast, the better off.
    Higher as in number of degrees of higher as in closer to due North at 0 degree? Thank you.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    Right, not all beach breaks are bad at handling long period swells, but I'd say the majority of beach breaks will close out more with the longer period stuff due to the higher refraction.

    Pacific Beach in San Francisco - breaks in deep water with gradual slope.
    Puerto Escondido - actually is 90% close outs, and very dependent upon sand bar formation on any given day.

    Most East Coast beach breaks, will lean towards more high close outs. The higher the angle of the swell to the coast, the better off.
    Exactly. Pacific beach is also a fickle break. . Think about how far out you go at long sandbar beach breaks before you hit neck deep water. In many nj beaches, it's a few feet. That's a sharp drop. Now obviously long sandbars can close out as well. That also has to do with angle of sand/angle of wave direction, which is a different function altogehter.

    Blacks...look how far out the wave is breaking!
    blackso_surf_USA_California_San_Diego_County_blacks_beach_45cef7adc3652.jpg

    Average NJ....a few feet from shore. That's why nj GENERALLY does better with shorter period stuff, which is better FOR nj anyway since that makes up 95% of the swells anyway.
    Irene2_NewJerseySundayPM_Econ-8784.jpg

    These two pics basically show why blacks will handle a long period swell WAY better on average than your average nj break. A longer less steep sandbar that won't be overpowered by a ground swell. The longer period stuff can start breaking in much deeper water and will feel the bottom of the sand earlier therefore giving it time to break in pieces, rather than just exploding on a 15 block close out when it suddenly hits a sandbar close to shore.
    Last edited by shark-hunter; Mar 18, 2014 at 04:32 PM.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lewes, DE
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    121
    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    Higher as in number of degrees of higher as in closer to due North at 0 degree? Thank you.
    Lets say your beach faces due East, which is about 90 degrees (this is the approximate beach facing direction in Delaware, where I live). If the swell is coming from the East, it will tend to close out more, where as if it is coming from and angle, either more from the south or north, then it will tend to break down the line with less close outs.

    So, when the period increases, it creates more refraction, so that swells coming from the South or North, will refract as they get into shallower water and as they approach the surf zone, the swells will be coming more from the East direction due to the refraction.

    Does that make it clearer? Pictures would make it easier to understand, but I'm not feeling that motivated at the moment...
    Last edited by Swellinfo; Mar 18, 2014 at 04:39 PM.

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    Lets say your beach faces due East, which is about 90 degrees (this is the approximate beach facing direction in Delaware, where I live). If the swell is coming from the East, it will tend to close out more, where as if it is coming from an angle, either more from the south or north, then it will tend to break down the line with less close outs.
    NOT always! Generally yes, but it really depends how the sand is set up. Maybe you've had a couple of south swells that has rearranged the sand and no longer facing due east anymore, but north northerly! Just because the beach faces east, doesn't mean the sandbars are facing that way! I've also found the deep troughs in the sand create the best sandbar. In other words walk across the beach in the ocean perpendicular and you get different depths of sand. This allows the waves to hit the shallow part and break and then deeper part doesn't break so no close out!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lewes, DE
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    Quote Originally Posted by shark-hunter View Post
    NOT always! Generally yes, but it really depends how the sand is set up. Maybe you've had a couple of south swells that has rearranged the sand and no longer facing due east anymore, but north northerly! Just because the beach faces east, doesn't mean the sandbars are facing that way! I've also found the deep troughs in the sand create the best sandbar. In other words walk across the beach in the ocean perpendicular and you get different depths of sand. This allows the waves to hit the shallow part and break and then deeper part doesn't break so no close out!
    I agree that angle of sandbars are influential, but in general, in an open beach without structures, the sandbars will be parallel to the beach.