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  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    I agree that angle of sandbars are influential, but in general, in an open beach without structures, the sandbars will be parallel to the beach.
    On average, yes.

  2. #32
    Just to be clear, its OCEAN beach, SF. Unless you are talking about Pacifica, where the break would be called Linda Mar beach.

    And Ocean Beach has one of the longest stretching sand bars out there. It breaks a long, long way out.

    And sand bars are less consistent cause its just sand. Moving sand. Generally you need a good storm to put the sand where it needs to be, then a couple swells to destroy the bars and back to square 1. The most consistent sand bars will be the ones with a solid surface underneath to hold the sand in place, i.e pipeline, and Cape St. Francis from Endless Summer fame.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by jlmlax99 View Post
    Got some groundswell coming, whats the best type of sandbar for longer period groundswell. Would a reef or point break be the best?
    Old subway cars, car tires, and hospital waste makes for the best bottom conditions.

  4. #34
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by salt View Post
    Old subway cars, car tires, and hospital waste makes for the best bottom conditions.
    Theoretically, if I started to dump old cars, cinder blocks, my office supplies, and other assorted debris at my home break slanting to the right, would I have a gnar gnar belmar esque peeling right hander?

  5. #35
    Join Date
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    Gnar Gnar for sure.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by EmassSpicoli View Post
    cep, true dat. I was there just over a month ago on a murky, gnarly day. Soup galore bro. It's something else!

    To the right of the main jetty at Westport (away from the Cove, right as in how we'd take a right wave facing beach) the other day looked similarly soupy. Winter BB's bro, gnarl gnarl gnarl. That goes for EC too.
    I never been that far out before,behind the peak at ob.id be scared for great whites out there.lucky on the ec,waves break fairly close to the sand.im a decent swimmer,wouldnt say great but on those big ob days where the waves break a mile out,theres no way I could swim in without a board.swimming a mile wouldn't be too difficult,but factor in the sets on the head,the currents,id be a goner

  7. #37
    #Belmarcoral #NobeachbreaksinBelmar

  8. #38
    surfsolo is my favorite

  9. #39
    One that is littered with wind turbines!

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by jlmlax99 View Post
    Got some groundswell coming, whats the best type of sandbar for longer period groundswell. Would a reef or point break be the best?
    Back to the OP.

    Listen to Mr. Swell Info. He knows.

    Yes, a reef/point/inlet or any other significant structure will probably be better than the relatively straight sandbars a barrier island type beach usually has.

    Alternatively, scout around. Look down the waterline at high and low tides for sections of the beach that jut out a bit. Maybe 50-100yds wide. Keep an eye on that spot the next clean, small swell. Watch how the swell bends around it. If you have 2 miles of straight beach and this one section is different then the bottom contour has a good chance of being different too. Sections of the beach like that often don't have much of a trough, or none at all, between the outer bar and the beach and it refracts the long period swells just different enough to give you a make able wave.

    ======^======

    Also, look for bad rips. There's probably a break in the sandbar. Surf the corners of the bar. Be careful.

    TL;DR
    If the waves are closing out and there's no structure to shape a long period swell, look for a lump of sand. Surf there.