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Thread: tides question

  1. #11
    Join Date
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    This week is a good example of why knowing the extent of the high and low tides is important. As some of you may have noticed, the mornings have been much better, from a tide stand point, then the afternoons. If you check the tide heights, you would notice that this morning's high tide was only a little over 3', wereas the high tide this afternoon is about 4.5'. Hence, the effect of high tide was much less this morning, which is especially noticable with the very small waves we have been "blessed" with lately. Stay tuned for lesson #2 at some point in the future.........

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieInOC View Post
    Stay tuned for lesson #2 at some point in the future.........
    Thanks!!! I don't know how I've been surfing the last 12 years of my life without knowing this. Man, i guess it's just been luck that I paddle out to surf the nicest waves jk

    http://viewmorepics.myspace.com/inde...mageID=9929268
    Last edited by wang; Jul 1, 2008 at 07:05 PM. Reason: pic didn't show

  3. #13
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    Tide and Current Glossary

    http://co-ops.nos.noaa.gov/publications/glossary2.pdf

    mean tide level (MTL)—A tidal datum. The arithmetic mean of mean high water and mean low water. Same as half-tide level.

    half-tide level—Same as mean tide level.

    mean high water (MHW)—A tidal datum. The average of all the high water heights observed over the National Tidal Datum Epoch. For stations with shorter series, comparison of simultaneous observations with a control tide station is made in order to derive the equivalent datum of the National Tidal Datum Epoch.

    mean low water (MLW)—A tidal datum. The average of all the low water heights observed over the National Tidal Datum Epoch. For stations with shorter series, comparison of simultaneous observations with a control tide station is made in order to derive the equivalent datum of the National Tidal Datum Epoch.

    National Tidal Datum Epoch—The specific 19-year period adopted by the National Ocean Service as the official time segment over which tide observations are taken and reduced to obtain mean values (e.g., mean lower low water, etc.) for tidal datums. It is necessary for
    standardization because of periodic and apparent secular trends in sea level. The present National Tidal Datum Epoch is 1960 through 1978. It is reviewed annually for possible revision and must be actively considered for revision every 25 years

  4. #14
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    always can count on you pulling the references out lump.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by beaner View Post
    always can count on you pulling the references out lump.
    That's right bud!! There is always confusion/questions about this stuff. This glossary is a great reference..