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  1. #21
    I love my quad since we surf mushy waves a lot on the east coast. I love my thruster when the surf is actually good but thank god for my quad or I would not have as half as much fun surfing here! when I travel I leave the quads at home though of course


    Quote Originally Posted by Zippy View Post
    To surf a quad well you have to have a quad style. If you are a flowing surfer connecting turns etc a quad is perfect. If you want to get vertical all the time a thruster is better and offers snappier turns. I think a quad can do almost everything a thruster can just not as good. A thruster on the other hand can never generate the easy effortless speed of a quad without it becoming a pumping down the line mess. I'm a quad guy through and through, just fits my style. Rode a thruster all winter because I broke a quad box on my 5 fin. The thruster did great in hollow surf and allowed me to get some big vertical snaps. Once the winter guts dropped out of the swells I have been suffering, time to get back on he quad for me.

  2. #22
    how did you get those pics of me from last weeks swell. weird


    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewIfallalot View Post
    I'm hearing a lot of BS from some people who've never ridden a Bonzerů

    There's an instant perceived bias from some people as soon as they see a surfer on a board besides a thruster and the armchair quarterbacking starts.





    Yeah, definitely can't get the tail around or go rail to rail

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by salt View Post
    Surfing a quad is fun. You just gotta have the right fins and fin placement for the particular wave. This takes a little while and cash to figure-out. As an approaching 40 surfer, I find they generate their own speed a bit more, which I like. The lack of pivot-ability, and sometimes too much speed, are my only complaints about them. I own quads, single-fins, 2+1s, and thrusters. I love them all!
    that's a very un-scientific approach...but how many shapers really know the physics behind what they're making? Surfboard science is still more trial and error than anything. As far as pivot, even a quad can turn on a dime, as long as you're using very upright fins...you just have to shift your weight to the tail during the turn. The center fin on a thruster gives more stability, at the cost of speed.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by leetymike808 View Post
    What i dont understand is why i've seen so many people talk about "rail to rail" surfing and on what boards it was good for/bad for.

    Now am i wrong to think that most the boards in the discussions would actually be boards that are designed to be good at just that, as they are all usually modern tweaks on 60's-70's designs where rail to rail surfing was at its peak?

    Like fishes, bonzers, single fins...these boards all (in my opinion) perform the way they are supposed to when you put them on rail. Now i've been surfing a long enough time to be pretty average in the lineups, however im not a know every maneuver type of guy. I know what a barrel is. But ive always thought a nice round house cutback, was the epitome of rail to rail, as you are taking your turn from one rail around to the other...am i wrong on that?
    I mean, it may mean something different to various people. But When I say rail to rail, I am referring to a high volume of turns that completely transfer weight from one side to the other. For instance, to me, the "fish" as we know it, based on the rail volume, board volume and the wide tail do NOT go very well rail to rail, regardless of the fin setup. Many times, you will have a stall out effect or a "slide out" kind of deal. So yes, on a fish of any kind, with a more dramatic turning radius, yes you can perform a nice roundhouse figure 8 style cutback and go rail to rail. But if you look back in the 60's, 70's and "some" of the 80s, you will notice a lot of guys are "grabbing rail" to counteract the slide out and the volume of the board. Its like the only way to stabalize the board and make a quicker less dramatic turning radius is to grab the rail and force the issue. You see a lot of that on all the older boards. Single fins...

    And this is also all relative to the board in question... So if you take your typical Channel Island's AM board... lets say a 6'1x18.5x2.25 or whatever and you take a head high reef break... You put your thurster fin setup on it and you paddle out. When you initiate that top turn (frontside) and you are cutting back to get into your figure 8 motion, that central pivot fin of the thruster helps you set that rail, with somewhat of a central balance in the back tail and get from one rail to the OTHER rail faster... That is the key to what I am saying, FASTER.... and when you get back towards the falling lip to finish your figure eight roundhouse, the pivot fin also helps you change directions QUICKLY and get back on the other rail....

    I would assume, on the same board, on the same wave, with a quad fin setup, You could still accomplish the same turn, however it would have an exageratted bottom turn with a wider radius and your cutback would go further out on the face when you initiate it, and it would take you more distance and more time to get from your heel side rail at the peak of your top turn and all the way in the half-figure eight onto your toeside rail....

    So, in a nutshell, any board can go "rail to rail" and mostly when I refer to "rail to rail" I am talking about someones style, the way they attack waves.... Rail to rail to me translates into shaper turns, and in modern days, more vertical ones, because taking a steep vertical angle with speed and flipping the tail around getting your other rail engaged is the fastest way to go rail to rail....

    I am sure someone else could explain it better, or even give me a different idea of their "rail to rail" but its a broad term that I used for changing direction....

    Occi is a "rail to rail" guy to me. His whole style is about smooth, fluid turns at sometimes radical angles, where other guys are barrel riders, or high flying aerialists.

  5. #25
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    And so everyone can form their own opinion, here is a link to the video...

    This is Taylor Knox in Mainland Mexico on some sort of point break, riding a standard shortboard with a 5 fin bonzer setup... Make your own case. He is definitely making nice rail to rail turns, but for a professional surfer who we have all watched for years, who usually flips that tail right through the top and it releases into his landing spot as he whips the baord back under him. The same modern style that every single guy on the ASP has. They all release their tails through the top. Its the beginning of almost every trick in the book..

    Does it, or does it not look like he is working SUPER hard to get through turns, sometimes having to lean over almost sideways and flail his arms back to get enough torque for the turn... I just watched it thinking, man I bet you his upper legs are gonna be plenty cramped after riding that board all day... Looks like its putting a lot of pressure on his legs and core, where usually they flip those shortboards around like its a piece of looseleaf with no fins on it.

    http://bonzer5.com/film/contemporary...bonzer-mexico/

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    Next board I get shaped, I proabably want to have FCS or Future plugs put into it, but with 5 slots. So It can be ridden as a 5 fin bonzer, a thurster or a quad, a quad bonzer or even a twin... I think that will be the fun way to TRULY see what makes each setup tick. Taking the same board, and trying the different things on it. I have surfed DIFFERENT boards with different setups, but I have never gotten a chance to try all on one. That seems like the way to go anyway. I dont know why more shapers arent doing that. I understand if its a custom shape, but if you are putting your boards in a shop on the rack, put in 5 plugs and that could let the rider have all kinds of fun with it.
    I like your spirit, Zach... Keep in mind that Bonzers are not just about the fin setups. They're about the combination of fin setups and bottom contours, which are very... VERY intricate and complicated. We're talking multiple concaves, channels and wings, along with a very fine tuned fin setup with specific cant and toe angles to work in conjunction with the bottom contours.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    I like your spirit, Zach... Keep in mind that Bonzers are not just about the fin setups. They're about the combination of fin setups and bottom contours, which are very... VERY intricate and complicated. We're talking multiple concaves, channels and wings, along with a very fine tuned fin setup with specific cant and toe angles to work in conjunction with the bottom contours.
    Yeah, no doubt. I can imagine what a mind **** it is trying to put together all of these variables to make the "perfect" craft. Thats why trial and error are so much fun...

    An a side note, what ever happened to channel bottoms? I bought a sweet Peter Benjamin thurster with a 6 channel bottom on it. Deep, thick channels too. Glasses on fins. It was probably from the early 90s or late 80s from the design. I tooled around with it on the cliffs for a summer and it was SUPER fun...

    Why don't we see any different bottom contour concepts like that these days?

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    Why don't we see any different bottom contour concepts like that these days?
    Read the surfy surfy blog more.
    I saw Daniel Thomson carve some really clean channels into a board at Sacred Craft one year. I think one of his Firewire models has channels, so that's pretty main stream. Manny Caro has channels on some of his board models. I've seen a couple of Kies around that were made recently with 6 channel bottoms. There's a lot cats out there playing with channels, planing hulls, contours. Carl Ekstrom has been building finless boards for years that are all channels and bottom contours.

  9. #29
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    Oh yeah, the real answer is cuz it's a niche market in a niche market. Most guys want whatever Biolos or Merrick tells them to want.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    Yeah, no doubt. I can imagine what a mind **** it is trying to put together all of these variables to make the "perfect" craft. Thats why trial and error are so much fun...

    An a side note, what ever happened to channel bottoms? I bought a sweet Peter Benjamin thurster with a 6 channel bottom on it. Deep, thick channels too. Glasses on fins. It was probably from the early 90s or late 80s from the design. I tooled around with it on the cliffs for a summer and it was SUPER fun...

    Why don't we see any different bottom contour concepts like that these days?
    I think channel bottoms are great but from what i understand are hard to do right. easier to put a single to double concave and they do pretty much the same thing
    Last edited by Peajay4060; Apr 22, 2014 at 07:13 PM.