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Thread: Paddling Inlets

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    19

    Paddling Inlets

    Anyone do it regularly or regret trying it?

    I have always been too much of a puss, but these days I am thinking paddling across certain inlets might be extremely advantageous in specific situations.

    Also, I am not an expert on inlets, but I am sure each one has it's own unique characteristics. Forgive me for the blanket question as I assume certain inlets are safer or more dangerous than others for varying reasons (boat traffic, currents, width, lack of entrance/exit points), so your experience may not be anything like the inlets i intend to cross.

    But honestly that's fine. Please share, if you have any experience with inlets, i'm down trust your words as gospel and dive right in...

  2. #2
    Ive crossed before but just avoid tide changes and full moon tides. Tried to cross once with an out going full moon tide- which I knew was a risk. Was getting pulled out quickly once I hit the channel - inlet looked more like a river. Luckily managed to snagged a buoy and hang on. Boater came a picked me up and gave me a ride. Was very tired from surfing so that didn't help either. Just avoid crossing at peak tide changes and watch for boats.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilmington, North Carolina, United States
    Posts
    666
    Quote Originally Posted by ncsurfnc View Post
    Ive crossed before but just avoid tide changes and full moon tides. Tried to cross once with an out going full moon tide- which I knew was a risk. Was getting pulled out quickly once I hit the channel - inlet looked more like a river. Luckily managed to snagged a buoy and hang on. Boater came a picked me up and gave me a ride. Was very tired from surfing so that didn't help either. Just avoid crossing at peak tide changes and watch for boats.

    Exactly what my friend here from NC says...avoid tidal changes...at low it's gonna be like a river going out and at high probably the other way around. If you watch your crossing a bit each day before you try the paddle you should learn when's the best time to cross. If you time it right the flow should be minimal (at least for your paddle across) good luck

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Atlantic City
    Posts
    1,832
    Quote Originally Posted by kickmee6 View Post
    Anyone do it regularly or regret trying it?

    I have always been too much of a puss, but these days I am thinking paddling across certain inlets might be extremely advantageous in specific situations.

    Also, I am not an expert on inlets, but I am sure each one has it's own unique characteristics. Forgive me for the blanket question as I assume certain inlets are safer or more dangerous than others for varying reasons (boat traffic, currents, width, lack of entrance/exit points), so your experience may not be anything like the inlets i intend to cross.

    But honestly that's fine. Please share, if you have any experience with inlets, i'm down trust your words as gospel and dive right in...
    start doing ocean swims, you know like 5K's but in the big 0. that'l slay that dragon but quick.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
    Posts
    1,601
    I seen that once during hurricane bill at the squan inlet.if u can paddle through an inlet with big boats and the gnarly waves that come when ur about to enter the ocean,then u might aswell paddle out from the beach like everyone else.the ocean can be scary,its almost always scary,but when u start doing things like paddling through an inlet,its a recipe for disaster.the biggest waves iv ever seen break are in the inlet between the 2 jettys.if all else fails,just jump off the jetty

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    922
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    2
    Do it all the time at 1st street here. Just have to watch out for the boats. Will run your ass down

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Singer Island
    Posts
    1,289
    Many of us paddle across the Lake Worth (Palm Beach) Inlet from Singer Island to surf Reef Road. For eons. 1. If you see pilot boat coming in wait for the tanker to follow. Prop suck is no joke. 2. Wear strap on sandals for when you climb in and out, and time the surge from boat traffic so you don.t get cut up scrambling up or down the rocks. Forget about timing the lull. You'll have to make it back eventually and you can't wait for one lull over and one lull back. Just let the current sling shot you. Go way, way, way in if its out going and aim for the middle of the other jetty. Don't go near the mouth!!!! If you get too close to the mouth you can paddle against the current if you stay real close to the jetty. 3. Save some energy for the paddle back, and lots of daylight too. (bring a power bar or something to fuel up on) 4. Avoid blowboaters at all costs!!! They will tack back and forth and are complete douchebags. 5. Don't worry about the sharks. They are there and they are big but worrying about them won't help (see tip 2. - strap on sandals to prevent bleeding). Have fun.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    19
    Woah thats awesome. I enjoyed everyone's stories, I really appreciate the info. Collectively there's a lot of good points in here and a good place to start.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    anywhere there is surf
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    Ive done it many times when I was a wee lad, I had to on an incoming tide walk just about to the end of the jetty and start there, always paddle with the current you will get across a lot faster and the opposite goes with outgoing tide. Be careful its really not the smartest thing to do, plus im sure the marine patrol or sheriff dept would love to give a citation for that anymore.

  10. #10
    Just out of curiosity, which inlet are you looking to cross? might get some better info on how it works