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Thread: Local Vs. Value

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    A State of Confusion
    Posts
    1,495
    I just beat up all the Jr. High school kids and steal their board, leash, wax and lunch money. But I do make sure they are "locals".

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
    Posts
    3,638
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    26
    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    I have purchased a few boards off the rack at a local shop, I have one custom SB that I went straight through the shaper, and I have a new custom LB on the way as well. I got a good deal on all of them I feel, but I much prefer going through a local shaper now. For me it isn't as much about price as it is about quality and great service. I'll probably never buy another board off the rack again, but if I came across one that I just couldn't pass up because of the price, I can't say that I would pass it up.

    As far as gear and accessories, I'll buy from whoever has the best deal and is the most convenient for me. I don't live right on the beach, so it's sometimes easier to just buy it online and have it delivered. I'm all about supporting local businesses, but the prices can be seriously wack on things like wetsuits, fins, etc., If I was made of money I wouldn't care about how much extra they are charging, but i don't have it like that, so I'm going to be a smart shopper on the little things.

    Most shop owners don't have a good business model anyways, most of the time i'm disapointed at the selection and the lack of service. Nothing worse then trying to deal with a teenage kid who thinks he's the next Kelly Slater because he works at a surf shop and talks out of his a$$ about things he knows little to nothing about. I'd rather just buy on a website and have it send to my doorstep to avoid the aggravation.

    What I would suggest to all you shop owners is.... GET A GOOD WEBSITE SETUP AND LET US ORDER FROM YOU ONLINE! Problem solved....
    True that... But shipping can be a *****. I have made like 10 websites for my company recently, some with online stores, and man... that shipping is a hassle. Especially for small business. It costs money monthly to have a live inventory system. If you dont have one, you have to cross reference and know how to manage an online store. And when there isn't a big market for surfshops online, you will probably lose more money than you sell and have headaches.

    IMO, most surf shops, especially on the EC are geared towards spur of the moment spending. Tourists that have money to burn and want a rash guard for 3 days. Or that want to buy a nice pair of boardies for their kinds on the beach, or will pay $80 for reef sandals with a bottle opener on them. They are impulse buyers.

    Sure, a lot of us know great shops, that give us great service, but I can't imagine too many shops that stay alive catering to the winter warriors....

    People don't think, Im going to the Jersey shore in two months, I better order boardies online and all that. They just say, man, i'm at the beach now, let me run in there and grab a pair of shades, or boardies, or whatever.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    3,677
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    True that... But shipping can be a *****. I have made like 10 websites for my company recently, some with online stores, and man... that shipping is a hassle. Especially for small business. It costs money monthly to have a live inventory system. If you dont have one, you have to cross reference and know how to manage an online store. And when there isn't a big market for surfshops online, you will probably lose more money than you sell and have headaches.

    IMO, most surf shops, especially on the EC are geared towards spur of the moment spending. Tourists that have money to burn and want a rash guard for 3 days. Or that want to buy a nice pair of boardies for their kinds on the beach, or will pay $80 for reef sandals with a bottle opener on them. They are impulse buyers.

    Sure, a lot of us know great shops, that give us great service, but I can't imagine too many shops that stay alive catering to the winter warriors....

    People don't think, Im going to the Jersey shore in two months, I better order boardies online and all that. They just say, man, i'm at the beach now, let me run in there and grab a pair of shades, or boardies, or whatever.
    I hear ya. It's definitely not a walk in the park and takes a good model to make it profitable and easy to keep up with. For those who can't seem to figure it out, It might be worth hiring someone with experience to run the e-commerce side of the business if the owner isn't savvy enough or can't seem to make it work. It can be done, it's 2014, and the internet isn't going anywhere. Surf shops are just another retail business, like most others, but what I find is most surf shop owners don't treat it like a REAL business. They treat it like a flea market shop that can be closed at the drop of a hat because there are waves or something more important at the moment. With that type of mentality, the business will always be more of a hobby than anything.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,412
    People all have their own reason for buying local... or not. (Great grammar, huh?) Some people buy local boards just because it makes them feel good... pride, loyalty, whatever. Some people buy local boards because they have a history with the shaper... or they get a good deal... or they like to have input into what they're buying. I'm saying all of these things because all of these things have "value."... whether it's monetary or otherwise.

    Personally, I think a small time, local shaper is more likely to give you a good deal if you give him good, honest information about how and where you surf, show him what you ride and tell him what the board doesn't do that you want it to do better, and give him some idea of basic dims you're looking for. At that point you get out of his way, and let the shaper put his local knowledge and skills to work. If you do that, you're likely to get a board that's well under the price of an off the rack name brand, and has a very good chance of being better than the board you currently ride. And when I say "shaper," I mean board builder... and one with more than 3 boards and a logo to to his name.

    Do NOT expect to get that same price, and ask for extra fin boxes, fins, leash, traction pad, free repairs, resin tint, pinlines, and gloss and polish. If you want all that at a bargain basement price... go to a corporate shop and you'll find tons of computer designed, machine shaped, mass-produced boards of varying quality craftsmanship (some quite excellent), with or without a few feebees, because they can do it all for cheap. They have a factory, they buy in bulk, and they line up a dozen boards a day and glass them all at once.

    If... on the other hand... you want to bring your shaper a particular color sample, a picture of your current girlfriend's butt printed out on rice paper, customize your glass schedule, request specific combinations of resin, request a specific density of foam, and give him foil thickness and rocker measurements in mm every 6 inches, don't expect a board that's $100 less than the Big Name Brand. Expect to pay MORE. But then again... to YOU... it may have more "value.'

    Oh... and my blanks, resin, cloth, and vast majority of my tools are all made in the US. Here's why...
    waste of money.jpg
    If you can't read what that says, it says...

    Stainless
    Pakistan
    Last edited by LBCrew; May 7, 2014 at 09:16 PM.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
    Posts
    1,306
    buying quiksiver volcom boardies and ts are for rich people.i don't mind rocking the op's from walmart,they used to be a big surf sponser in the 90s

  6. #26
    I buy all my stuff from sunsations.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by mrcoop View Post
    I buy all my stuff from sunsations.
    can't miss one either...they're everywhere.

    Support small business, it's the driving force that keeps this country going.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    273
    All my gear I buy local. Sort of. I'll head down to the OBX for a board or a wetsuit just because I can get stuff cheaper and there's more shops to shop around in. Then I just use it as an excuse to see my uncle. My last trip down I was looking for a single fin, found a nice 6'3 that is now my favorite shortboard. Any way, I don't know if that's still considered local but it's my way of getting a more reasonable price. There's really only a handful of shops around me.

    Small stuff like leashes, traction pads, yada yada I'll buy at my local shop. My dad actually grew up across the street from the family that owns the shop so I feel the need to throw my money there way if I need something, and they have it.

    With all that being said, cloths and boardshorts are ridiculous. I just straight up don't wear that stuff. I'm in a wetsuit year round, I actually don't own any trunks. If I go swimming its in basketball shorts. Plus that crap is just way over priced, and I don't need it so I can't justify spending money on it

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,394
    Images
    5
    I've bought custom boards, talked about my needs and had him shape a board for me. Board was great but I crushed the deck in less than a year. Shaped a bunch of boards for myself, some rode great others not, crushed all the decks in less than a year. Bought a bunch of Bings, crushed all the decks in less than a year, all except one that was super glassed and weighed a ton. Same for other brands off the rack, all virtually destroyed in under 12 months. Last year I bought a firewire, mostly because a friend had one that I tried and loved. Rode it for the last year and it looks brand new other than a few dents on the bottom from my sons boney butt sitting on it at the beach. How you view value is the key, firewires are expensive as hell but for me they are worth it for the simple fact that they resist crushing better than any other board I have ever owned. I know I could go local and would prefer to keep my money local but I have yet to ride aboard as solid as my firewires and despite the hate for them they are the best value for my limited money. Pop out, china junk etc aside they ride great.
    Last edited by Zippy; May 8, 2014 at 02:25 AM.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    426
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    3
    My first board I bought was from a smaller business in san Diego. Customer service was great. Enjoyed the board. Still have it but its a seven foot and epoxy. I found I like poly better. Most of the shops here sell used on consignment. I got my 9' single fin Becker, used and highly damaged for 100 bucks. Also got a 6'3" 7S for 200. Its ok. Got it from a local shop too that was selling it on consignment. Its in good condition but I'm not crazy about it. The board I love is my 6'9" custom. I told the guy what I liked and didnt like about my other boards and he really hooked me up. He has been shaping here for almost 30 years. Its a great board. I will probably try to do that again next time. He gave me a really good deal on my wetsuit too so I was happy.
    I don't feel bad about asking what's on sale. Thats the only way I get clothes from local shops. No way I'm paying 60 for boardshorts. I just got a pair for 35. I still feel like thats kinda high. I guess the consignment deal supports local shops and surfers. I definitely like to support them but I'm not gonna just throw my money away. And if there are some super cheap boardies online I will pick them up.