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  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    342
    Yes. I have a 9'0 single fin, only LB I got, but man it has changed my surfing. I can go on for days about LBs and how there not just for small stuff and how they really come to life when it gets bigger. But I won't. I'll put it simply, if surfings your passion, ride all diffrent boards. Like someone else said it makes you a more complete surfer. Today I was out on my 6'3 single fin, tomorrow I'll be on the LB. Diffrent ride for diffrent wants/needs. But when you can switch up your style effectively with a diffrent boards for diffrent style waves, I think that makes a damn good surfer

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Atlantic City
    Posts
    2,256
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post

    Not saying LBing is easy by any means, but if you are an experienced shortboarder and you try one of those puppies on for size, its like having a motorcycle with training wheels.... Incredible...
    maybe a little credit also due to shapers/companies that saved it from obscurity. lb's in the '60s sucked, they
    were gone 1970/90, back in '90s but still sucked, but well-tweaked in the '00s to become FUN AGAIN!!!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
    Posts
    4,526
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by BassMon View Post
    Yes. I have a 9'0 single fin, only LB I got, but man it has changed my surfing. I can go on for days about LBs and how there not just for small stuff and how they really come to life when it gets bigger. But I won't. I'll put it simply, if surfings your passion, ride all diffrent boards. Like someone else said it makes you a more complete surfer. Today I was out on my 6'3 single fin, tomorrow I'll be on the LB. Diffrent ride for diffrent wants/needs. But when you can switch up your style effectively with a diffrent boards for diffrent style waves, I think that makes a damn good surfer
    No doubt. I completely agree with the big stuff comments too. At one point, I didn't have a gun, or any kind of stepup bigger than a 6'2 so I took a 9'0 thurster longboard out on Sunset Cliffs. Surf was probably 9-10 feet easy. Aside from a few dicey situations in the impact zone, the waves I caught that day were amazing. That king of the world feeling. I was getting into these things so early, and then just cruising, getting 10-12 turns in on each wave. 30 second rides. Changed my whole perspective on the longboard....

    Unfortunately, here in the SE, I really don't have to worry much about what to ride when its "big", so I rely on the LB just to be able to surf.... But yeah, riding big waves on a LB is an incredible feeling. Next time I rode that same spot on my shortboard when it was big, i felt like a fly just skipping around on the face...

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Wilmington, North Carolina, United States
    Posts
    667
    yup, I rode SB's all thru the 90s and just got burnt out on not being able to surf most days. it was esp annoying since i was going to college 2hrs away from the beach and only had a weekend or so a month to get down to the coast. I actually threw in the towel after an especially frustrating session and spent a decade out of the water. ffwd to 2010 when I moved back to the coast and a friend lent me an 8' funboard. I caught waves and realized just how much i missed surfing. 'Then I caught more and realized it wasn't me that sucked all this time but my equipment. I've got 4 LB's now and I surf EVERY DAY that there is the tiniest of pulses in the water. When waves get bigger the fun really begins. pulling a long flowing floater on a 9'2 in waist high surf is the coolest feeling ever. the speed you can obtain also without pumping or bouncing around on the board is amazing. LBers aren't worried about getting caught behind sections, if anything you race way past the wave until you get used to trimming and slowing down. oh and Noseriding don't get me started on that good luck and happy hunting!

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
    Posts
    1,938
    Quote Originally Posted by Hawkheart View Post
    So I'm a teenager, and of course as a teenager I ride a shortboard (5'9 and 6'0). I surf at Assateague Island (near OCMD). Assateague is known to be a "longboarders heaven" but it's also very fun for shortboarders. I'm low on money... But surfing is my passion. Should I just stick to shortboarding?
    u started surfing on a shortboard?that's pretty damn impressive,u should always have a longboard for small days.a good quiver should have all the necessary boards,a standard shortboard,a step up,and a longboard.i bought a longboard 3 years ago and I still never rode it because it doesn't fit in my car.i have a small car so I ride small boards

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    sea
    Posts
    1,938
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    No doubt. I completely agree with the big stuff comments too. At one point, I didn't have a gun, or any kind of stepup bigger than a 6'2 so I took a 9'0 thurster longboard out on Sunset Cliffs. Surf was probably 9-10 feet easy. Aside from a few dicey situations in the impact zone, the waves I caught that day were amazing. That king of the world feeling. I was getting into these things so early, and then just cruising, getting 10-12 turns in on each wave. 30 second rides. Changed my whole perspective on the longboard....

    Unfortunately, here in the SE, I really don't have to worry much about what to ride when its "big", so I rely on the LB just to be able to surf.... But yeah, riding big waves on a LB is an incredible feeling. Next time I rode that same spot on my shortboard when it was big, i felt like a fly just skipping around on the face...
    that's the cool thing about longboards,u can actually ride it anytime for any swell.u can surf on the small days,and when the surf is 8ft and above and ur shorty doesn't have the paddling power,u can take the log out and still get bombs.I seen people get barreled on logs,do nice carves.I think its a lot harder to do progressive surfing on a log than a shortboard

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,504
    YES... you should get a longboard. And a fish... when you can afford one.

    Like 42 said, a longboard has a longer lifespan than a shortboard, so think if it as a long term investment in your surfing.

    I broke away from the shortboard-only mentality about 20 years ago, after learning to surf on the first "shortboards" of the shortboard revolution from the late 60's/early 70's. Single finned shortboards first, then twins, then quads and other multi-finned boards, and finally thrusters. Only ever rode longboards on small summer days when I borrowed one from somebody. Added a couple longboards (a classic log and a HPLB) to my quiver around '95, and they've been a part of it ever since. I consider them a must have here in NJ, and consider it a big mistake not having one all along.

    Today one of the greatest things about my surfing life is having the ability to fully appreciate every type of board design, and have the ability to make choices based on conditions (and mental state!) to get the most out of every session.
    Last edited by LBCrew; May 10, 2014 at 04:48 PM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
    Posts
    4,526
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    YES... you should get a longboard. And a fish... when you can afford one.

    Like 42 said, a longboard has a longer lifespan than a shortboard, so think if it as a long term investment in your surfing.

    I broke away from the shortboard-only mentality about 20 years ago, after learning to surf on the first "shortboards" of the shortboard revolution from the late 60's/early 70's. Single finned shortboards first, then twins, then quads and other multi-finned boards, and finally thrusters. Only ever rode longboards on small summer days when I borrowed one from somebody. Added a couple longboards (a classic log and a HPLB) to my quiver around '95, and they've been a part of it ever since. I consider them a must have here in NJ, and consider it a big mistake not having one all along.

    Today one of the greatest things about my surfing life is having the ability to fully appreciate every type of board design, and have the ability to make choices based on conditions (and mental state!) to get the most out of every session.
    Yup. State of mind.

    Somedays, I think, well, do I want to get 8 or 10 waves today, and make try a few airs? Or do I want to just get as many waves as possible and just have fun. If its the latter, than longboard it is.

    More surfing. Less paddling = Long Boards. I will take every little scap that rolls through and just clock tons of waves on the LB, where on the SB, you gotta be so selective and do more paddling and waiting than surfing. Specially round these parts.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Rhody
    Posts
    192
    Plus -- you have an awesome longboard shaper in OBX, Tim Nolte. I ride a 9 foot custom TN 2+1 setup high performance longboard up here in Rhode Island, and I can do everything on it from slushy Narragansett beach to overhead Point Judith. It doesn't carve quite like a shorter board, but it makes everything easy, like others have said you get into big waves earlier and generally can have fun when the shortboarders are pounding their traction pads in frustration!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    342
    Quote Originally Posted by babybabygrand View Post
    if anything you race way past the wave until you
    Do a big huge drawn out drop knee cut back. Ugh im salivating at the thought.