LOGIN | REGISTER

Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 33
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Tinton Falls, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    525
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    The link you posted in the other thread said that there have been 9 attacks in Delaware in the past 100 years. The last attack was in 2007 or something by a Sand Tiger at Rehobeth.
    Interesting... thanks.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Wilmington,DE
    Posts
    237
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by zach619 View Post
    I read a few years ago in a local DE online article that the MD/DE border area has the highest concentration of "different" shark species on the entire east coast. It also said that with that being said, it is an anomaly that there is such little human / shark interaction up there.

    And even in panic, most people can tell the difference between a shark and a rock fish. They look nothing alike.

    Witnesses down here two weeks ago all said that the lady got big by a shark. 4-5 feet in length cause she lifted it out of the water. Thats where is gets grey, because people assumed it was a bull, some said it was s sand tiger.... In a flash, it's probably hard to identity what kind of shark it was, unless it has blatant signs, like a black tip or a hammerhead.
    You are correct; interestingly Delaware has never experienced an in shore shark attack, even with the many species breeding within the Delaware Bay.However, I do recall a story from a Dive Master, who I trained with mentioning a buddy spear fishing around the Cape losing his fish creel to a shark. The diver apparently wasn't paying attention, then realized a massive tug, followed by the severing of the creel line.Keep your toes up!
    Last edited by andrewk529; Jun 10, 2014 at 09:45 PM. Reason: ..

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Wilmington,DE
    Posts
    237
    Images
    1
    My personal observation supporting the lack of major shark attacks in Delaware, is the proximate relation to the Continental Shelf. Many of the pelagic species tend to reside along the transitional edges.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Tinton Falls, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    525
    Images
    18
    Quote Originally Posted by andrewk529 View Post
    My personal observation supporting the lack of major shark attacks in Delaware, is the proximate relation to the Continental Shelf. Many of the pelagic species tend to reside along the transitional edges.
    Florida has a lot of shark attacks, because the sharks and other fish stay within the multiple sandbars and relatively flat surf zone. This is quite the opposite in Delaware, where is is mostly shorebreak.

  5. #25
    those are dogfish, they eat everything, good and bad. kill 'em if ya catch 'em

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    MD - VA
    Posts
    4,286
    Quote Originally Posted by SI_Admin View Post
    Florida has a lot of shark attacks, because the sharks and other fish stay within the multiple sandbars and relatively flat surf zone. This is quite the opposite in Delaware, where is is mostly shorebreak.
    Florida has a lot of shark attacks because sharks prefer white trash when they're out garbage hunting.

    (that's kinda just kiddn, DSUP, who's your buddy)

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    MD - VA
    Posts
    4,286
    Mosquitoes cause more deaths in North America than do sharks.

    Put that in your pipe & smoke it twitmongering 'waves2rip.'

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by waves2rip View Post
    those are dogfish, they eat everything, good and bad. kill 'em if ya catch 'em
    Not sure if your joking, but doggies are harmless with no teeth...not sure why you would killem or anything in the ocean.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    MD - VA
    Posts
    4,286
    Quote Originally Posted by mrcoop View Post
    Not sure if your joking, but doggies are harmless with no teeth...not sure why you would killem or anything in the ocean.
    I'm with Coop-A-Loop.

    Killing everything in the ocean:WTF .... 'waves2rip'.....first of all, are you that studly & massively a surfer dood that you feel confident that you can name yourself that? What, were you born an idiot or did you become one when your parents wouldn't feed you?
    Is it possible that 'waves2rip' is the spawn of satan, aka, trout hunter....?

  10. #30
    Florida has more attacks...not because the make up of the beach, but the waters are just plain warmer for a longer period and they have a greater variety and numbers.

    When we surf fish for red drum in Maryland, it can be constant shark action...I mean non stop...5 footers...it can get so bad, that we just give up...they tear up some chit, constantly changing leaders and replacing rigs because we get bit off. Most of the sharks are brown (sandbar) sharks...get spinners too...there are tons of sharks here in Maryland...mostly brown, sandbar, dusky, and sand tigers...with a good run of spinners in August. Spinners are my favorite...kinda like makos when fighting...nothing like seeing them jump and spin when sharkin from the surf zone.

    IMO, We have sharks for 4 months here in Maryland. Florida has them for 12 months, area dependent, and tourists can be in the water just as long. It's statistically just makes sense why Florida seems to be the worst...and with a huge coastline.
    Last edited by mrcoop; Jun 11, 2014 at 03:13 AM.