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  1. #21
    along with others in the thread, dawnpatrolsup and tlokein offer some solid advice that will help a lot

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,686
    Couple more things... when the wave is about to make impact with the tail of your board, really dig in as deep as you can on your paddling and give it another one or two strokes when you think you might have missed the wave, sometimes it's not over yet and you have a chance to get in still.

    Another thing, when I started putting my chin to the board at the point where i'm really digging in just before take off, I found my percentage of catching the wave went up. So I start paddling slow and long / strong with my chin up and shoulders square, but as I pick up my pace and start really digging in, my chin is actually touching the board. When it's small / mushy it requires more work typically, when the waves are good and have power you'll end up using less energy if you get the positioning down.

    You're going to have to find what works for you, you gotta have some kind of timing pattern you go through each time, something that keeps you consistent, once you find something that works, just try and repeat everything you did over and over again. Your body will find a way to save it or commit it to muscle memory, much like saving a file on a computer. Once you have the program, you can get the same results from it every time almost, minus the occasional glitch.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by cepriano View Post
    ...dont worry about excercizing your body,thats for dorks.doing pushups and sit ups might make u look good,but it wont help with your surfing.the best advice I can give is try to spend as much time in the water as possible...
    thanks...with that logic, most of the pros on the CT are dorks. OP said he has trouble with popping up and, since he lives about an hour from the nearest surfing beach (more like 2 hrs if he doesn't go to RI), I gave him a practical solution to add to his repertoire. I agree that without surfing knowledge, all the physical fitness in the world is useless, but the same is true vice versa...you can't have one without the other and expect to surf.

    Quote Originally Posted by DawnPatrolSUP View Post
    ...Don't start paddling too early, so many people tell you to do this but I find you can actually outrun the wave...
    I guess it's possible, but I've never seen anyone outrun a wave (maybe on a longboard...but I never watch them, so I wouldn't know). I can catch waves many ways, but paddling early works for me a lot of the time. I wish I could outrun a wave paddling on a shortboard...just don't have the shoulders for it, I guess.

    Supposedly, the bigger a wave is, that faster it's traveling...but it's also more powerful, so it's easier to catch than a small wave. Small waves are slower and, therefore, should be easier to catch, but they're usually weaker. I get more tired surfing in smaller waves than big waves...there's just more effort involved.
    Last edited by waterbaby; Jul 10, 2014 at 04:58 PM.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Inland, near DC
    Posts
    233
    Conditioning is important, but you could be in tip top shape, and still not be able to catch waves.

    It is all about positioning. There are TWO parts to this: 1. Positioning yourself correctly on the board; 2. Positioning you and the board on the wave, and at the proper speed to allow you to catch the wave. Both take lots of time to learn.

    1. As mentioned previously, you are likely too far back on the board. Work to find the proper spot. Keep inching forward until you start consistently nose diving/pearling. Try to stay in that spot, but arch your back as much as possible when paddling, this should shift your weight back enough to prevent pearling, then at that last push, when the nose of the board is out over the trough of the wave, flatten out, pushing your chin to the board like DawnPatrolSUP said above. You can also shift your weight forward a bit by bending your knees. If you're still pearling, try moving back a little bit at a time. You will eventually learn the balancing act after you find the sweet spot, and learn the weight shift thing, and the timing.

    2. Positioning on the wave. This is harder to learn, as it is vastly different from beach to beach, tide to tide, swell to swell and even from wave to wave. Every time you go out, try to watch someone who is riding a similar board. See where they put themself on the wave. Study which ones they make, and which they don't make. Spend some time on the beach watching. Then spend some time in the lineup watching. Start going for waves. Take mental notes, make adjustments.

    Once you've learned where to be on the board, and where to be on the wave, you will then begin to learn the timing of how to put yourself in the proper position.

    Try to go on cleaner days. When there is side chop on a wave, a little piece of side chop can turn a nice makeable section into an impossible section. If you're out on a choppy day, you need to be positioned in the trough between the side chops.

    Then there's the timing of when to pop up. This also takes time, and is different from swell to swell and wave to wave. You will eventually learn the feeling when things begin to accellerate, that's when you pop up. Practicing with the tape on the floor will help you get it to a single motion from prone to standing.

    If you have the cash, take your friend up on a lesson, see if it helps. He may be a good surfer, but a sucky teacher. Worst case scenario, get him to use the same sized board, and try to mimic what he's doing.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    VA Beach
    Posts
    1,179
    Quote Originally Posted by ZombieSurfer View Post
    if you have a buddy has a surf shop and gives you a lesson, as long as you learn one new thing it will be worth the money regardless of whether you hear if your on the right track or not. there's no set bar to reach in surfing, no plateau to hit. just go out there and have fun. and if you get a lesson from someone who's been surfing for a lot longer than you, chances are you're going to gain some knowledge by spending time with them. if you want my two cents and you have the money for a lesson, go for it
    There are differing opinions on the value of surf lessons. A private lesson or two might not hurt. It depends on the instructor. A decent instructor can see what you're doing right or wrong and point it out to you, perhaps expediting the initial learning process a bit and reducing the development and reinforcement of bad habits which may become difficult to break.
    Sometimes just a couple pointers from an experienced surfer can go a long way and even get you out of a slump which can occasionally happen.
    Surf etiquette is also an important part of surfing.
    A lot of good advice here though. Time in the water, trial and error, persistence, and a positive attitude are key. Have fun while learning and enjoy the journey.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Monmouth County
    Posts
    1,184
    A ton of great advice here.Watch instruction vids on you tube,watch the pros,and watch surfers at your break.Just like anything in life the more you do it the better you get but I feel with surfing its the hardest learning curve out there so be patient.Water time,water time and more water time.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,686
    Quote Originally Posted by waterbaby View Post
    I guess it's possible, but I've never seen anyone outrun a wave (maybe on a longboard...but I never watch them, so I wouldn't know). I can catch waves many ways, but paddling early works for me a lot of the time. I wish I could outrun a wave paddling on a shortboard...just don't have the shoulders for it, I guess.
    What i'm referring to is being a little too far inside, seeing the wave on the horizon, turning around and paddling for it like it's a race and then getting mowed down. If you paddle out deep enough but not too far, you'll find yourself right where the wave pops up 20 yards or so in front of you, at which point you couldn't outrun the wave unless you have a Wavejet or something. You can compensate for lack of position with paddling speed / direction to get in front of the wave before it closes out on your head and shoot down the line. Positioning, it's everything.

  8. #28
    Keep your paddle smooth and strong. When you are speeding it up, its not a spastic flailing of the arms, it still has to be smooth and and pulling you thru the water. Kinda loose finger cup your hands. If there's a bunch of water splashing around, you are doing it wrong (unless you are kicking your feet, which on a 9'8 they should be just up kickin in the air, if they are in the water, you're also doing it wrong).

    oh and move your fin all the way to the front of the fin box. That could be whats bogging you down when you stand up. Also make sure theres no knots in your leash. (it happens)

    Just dont do anything...the less you do, the more you do...the weather outside is weather...

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Atlantic City
    Posts
    2,559
    most of us learned without lessons.
    most of us think lessons can't hurt.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    New Bedford, MA
    Posts
    51
    Thanks again for all the valuable input guys. Definitely brought out some things that I hadn't thought of yet. Very much appreciated!

    Quote Originally Posted by leetymike808 View Post
    oh and move your fin all the way to the front of the fin box. That could be whats bogging you down when you stand up.
    Can you explain a little better for me how this would affect the take-off? I thought that only affected how 'tight' or 'loose' the board was with regard to turning. I have it about right in the center of its travel right now.

    My board also came with 2 small side bite fins. I took them off about halfway through my session last Saturday as an experiment, but didn't get a ride after that to be able to really compare anything.