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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    herd of cats, usa
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    177

    Upwelling is Counterintuitive

    looked up some scientific explanations and just ended up getting annoyed, I need surfer explanations bc im a commoner.

    how does south wind make the water go to 50 degrees in july in jersey??

    you'd think a south wind would push warmer water from down south up north and either keep temps the same or give em a bump and north/east winds would cool it down by pushing surface currents toward us.

    really only looked into upwelling when goin' to OBX deciding what rubber to bring. there I get it. its so exposed..blah blah.

    anybody got a simplified explanation?... sh!t is fascinating to me...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    For some reason wind blowing parallel to the beach causes the surface water to move at a right angle and go offshore, the void is filled by the deep cold water from below. It has something to do with the earths rotation but for the life of me I can't remember that far back to college level oceanography.

  3. #3
    same reason the water spins down your toilet when you flush

  4. #4
    It's got to have something to do with No. Jerz having so much east-facing coastline to which southerlies are true sideshore winds. I initially thought the same as you with all things south bringing warmer things this way. But a warmer wind isn't going to heat up such a substantial volume of water very much. It seems to be all about the nutrient-rich water rising up from the deep and that's water that is too deep to absorb heat from the sun or ambient air.

    Micah, I think you've had good responses to this in the past. What's good bro?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    herd of cats, usa
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    177
    Quote Originally Posted by sbx View Post
    same reason the water spins down your toilet when you flush
    I get that a void is being filled but how does deeper cold water beat out warmer surface water that is being driven by the wind to the same spot?

    water temp is really determined by currents is why this perplexes me. I didn't realize it til my fisherman homie from up north told me that he had seen 85 degree water off shore near georges bank. I called his bluff, looked it up, and he was spot on. crazy ish.

  6. #6
    Nutrient concentration

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Atlantic City
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    2,870
    Quote Originally Posted by Zippy View Post
    For some reason wind blowing parallel to the beach causes the surface water to move at a right angle and go offshore, the void is filled by the deep cold water from below.
    this is basically true.
    if you don't get it try thinking in three dimensions (L+H+W) as opposed to two.
    if you figure it out please answer THIS question:
    why must the hammer fall on so jersey??

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,577
    Courtesy of our friends at NOAA... http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/phy...720&interval=6

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Long Buried Island
    Posts
    785
    Displacement of water. When the upper layer of water moves in one direction, something has to take its place…hence the lower layer takes its place.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,577
    Quote Originally Posted by baddy trailerpark View Post
    why must the hammer fall on so jersey??
    You're gonna have to forgive my extreme dorky-ness... but the answer is, we really don't know for sure. That's because most of the studies on upwelling were done on the California coast, not here, and so there's not been adequate research and data collection to explain the subtleties of how it works along the Mid Atlantic Bight.

    But we do know this... the tremendous amount of variation along our coastline (the MAB) creates variations in upwelling patterns, different angles of the shoreline not being the only factor. Perhaps of more significance is the outflow of more buoyant water from rivers, bays, and estuaries, where lower salinity and higher temperature creates disturbances in the typical upwelling patterns. If this interests you, look up ekman transport, and read this article... http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/pdf/...U%3E2.0.CO%3B2