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Thread: Auto advice

  1. #11
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    Apr 2012
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    yea ur intake might be flooded but I doubt the water got that high.try getting a new battery and check ur fuses.if the electrical system got flooded while ur battery was connected then junk it because it will take an entire overhaul and cost way more to fix than get a new ride.my cousins a mechanic he told me a good thing right after sandy even tho it was too late since I lost 3 cars,if u disconnect the negative battery cable before a flood,ur car will live.if its connected and u get flooded its over

  2. #12
    Chich, try the easy stuff first. Access the distributor cap, pull it off and spray some WD-40 in it and re-install it (to get rid of any water). Sometimes, heavy rain will condensate in certain areas and do wacky stuff. If that doesn't do the trick, we can move forward with some other steps.

    Unless your van was in standing water up to the floorboard, I wouldn't worry about catalytic converters and such. Most likely related to water somehow making its way into your engine bay....either spark or fuel related.

  3. #13
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    Mar 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3rdperson View Post
    Relax killer. Its obviously not impossible. Just very, very, unlikely. If you replace the nissan and the dodge in those pictures with an econoline.. my point would be made.
    Maybe, if it was an old one with a carbd Windsor.
    But, I was guessing he's got one of them fuel injected, triton V8s, and not the old 351 with the round filter on top. Probably the 4.6 to save on gas, most tradesman do and Cheech is a master HVAC contractor, he's posted his work on here before. The back of his van too, it looked kind of low to the ground. The intake on those comes off the throttle body an goes off to the side of compartment, points down and sucks air up the sidewall where it's a little cooler. It's not that high up. Water doesn't have to come all the way up to the to the windows to make into the intake, let alone "soak the filter." Big V8, that's a lot of suction, probably 600-800cfm, if he drove through 2'-3' of water, that could be enough. I know other folks it's happened to. More to the point, he's trying to get it to the mechanic and he said it's running rough at idle. Start where the air goes in and then make sure there's gas and then spark. My suggestion was start with the air filter and an OBD2 reader. Just trying to be helpful.

    But hey, sure, it could be a problem with the exhaust, time to crawl under there, pull it and saw off the cat. What do know about cars, I'm a surfboard appraiser?

    You got a board you want appraised?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by zaGaffer View Post
    Maybe, if it was an old one with a carbd Windsor.
    But, I was guessing he's got one of them fuel injected, triton V8s, and not the old 351 with the round filter on top. Probably the 4.6 to save on gas, most tradesman do and Cheech is a master HVAC contractor, he's posted his work on here before. The back of his van too, it looked kind of low to the ground. The intake on those comes off the throttle body an goes off to the side of compartment, points down and sucks air up the sidewall where it's a little cooler. It's not that high up. Water doesn't have to come all the way up to the to the windows to make into the intake, let alone "soak the filter." Big V8, that's a lot of suction, probably 600-800cfm, if he drove through 2'-3' of water, that could be enough. I know other folks it's happened to. More to the point, he's trying to get it to the mechanic and he said it's running rough at idle. Start where the air goes in and then make sure there's gas and then spark. My suggestion was start with the air filter and an OBD2 reader. Just trying to be helpful.

    But hey, sure, it could be a problem with the exhaust, time to crawl under there, pull it and saw off the cat. What do know about cars, I'm a surfboard appraiser?

    You got a board you want appraised?
    HAHA. I do, but I'm pretty sure it's flooded as well. Don't need you to tell me that.

    Interested to hear what his mechanic says...

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by chicharronne View Post
    We had a flooding rain this week and my van got swamped. It limped home and would restart after I turned it off. The next morning, it would crank and idle roughly, but would conk out when gas applied. It's a 05 ford econoline 250.

    I'm hoping to be able to get it running enough to get to my mechanic. any suggestions on where to start would be appreciated.
    Sorry to hear about your troubles. I have 30+ years in the auto repair business. My experience is primarily with Dodge and Chrysler vehicle and I have little first hand knowledge of Ford products. However, cars is cars and the basic stuff is all pretty much the same. Wouldn't hurt to know what engine you've got in it. Water is generally not good for cars. It doesn't compress, will not burn and messes with electrical stuff. Living in south Florida, I've dealt with this scenario many times.

    Of course, it's difficult to properly diagnose a vehicle long distance, but I'll throw out some things you can try. I assume that you are somewhat mechanically inclined and have some basic tools to work with.

    I'm gonna assume that you were driving when this occurred as opposed to a rising water situation. If that's the case, you either ingested a lot of water into the air intake and/or saturated electrical/electronic components.

    In the first case (water in intake) there's two possible scenarios depending on how fast you were going and the engine was turning at the time:
    - You've got a bunch of water in the intake system and it is just soaking things down and preventing proper firing.
    - Or worst case, you got boatloads of water in there and have done mechanical damage to the engine. Water won't compress and if you do try to compress it something has to give, like connecting rods and pistons.

    I'd start by checking the engine air filter. If it is wet and/or all wrinkly looking then you've gotten water up in there. Continue checking the ductwork leading up to the engine's throttle body. Dry all this stuff out and give it a try.

    If you're still having trouble, pull the spark plugs* and check for presence of water. If there's a lot of water, disable the ignition coils (very important!) and crank the engine over with the plugs removed. This should push out any large amounts of water in the engine. Keep cranking until no more water comes out. Depending on how the intake manifold is configured, there may be water laying in there and that would require either removing the manifold or otherwise getting most of the water out. Clean and dry out the plugs, dry and re-install things and see how it goes.

    If it runs OK, then you're good. You're gonna want to change the oil because there's no doubt some water in there. Also check the other vital fluids (trans, P/S, differential) for water and change as needed. You'll probably have a check engine light on due to cranking the engine with stuff disconnected. Disconnect the battery or have your mechanic clear the codes.

    If it still runs crappy, you may still have water somewhere in the intake (it can hide in low spots, etc) and you can pull some plugs again to see if they're still getting wet. Repeat above if they are. If not, you've either got mechanical engine damage or some saturated electrical stuff. Electrical diagnosis might require a scan tool but usually can be fixed just by drying things. Carefully disconnecting electrical connectors and drying them may be your fix. Mechanical damage would probably require a compression test and engine teardown to see what's going on. Let's hope this is not the case.

    I hope this helps in resolving you problem. Feel free to ask more questions, I'll respond the best I can. If you need to, PM me with your number and we can talk over the phone. Good luck!

    *Note: a lot of Ford engine are prone to breaking spark plugs off in the engine. If this happens to you, Stop! Get the van towed to somebody with the proper tools and experience to fix this. You'll probably only make matters worse attempting to fix that on your own.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by kidrock View Post
    Chich, try the easy stuff first. Access the distributor cap, pull it off and spray some WD-40 in it and re-install it (to get rid of any water). Sometimes, heavy rain will condensate in certain areas and do wacky stuff. If that doesn't do the trick, we can move forward with some other steps.

    Unless your van was in standing water up to the floorboard, I wouldn't worry about catalytic converters and such. Most likely related to water somehow making its way into your engine bay....either spark or fuel related.
    I've also known Fords to have issues with start up when the distributor cap is wet. Thought it was older generations with that though. I have one from the same time frame as the OP and never such a problem. It's definitely a common malady in the previous generations.

  7. #17
    First off, Thanks to all for the input. I checked the filter and it was sopping wet and sucked in. it was bone dry from the filter to the intake. It cranked and ran.
    I retraced my steps and couldn't believe I got home. My main route home was probably 6' deep, so I went another route that ended up 3' deep in the beginning, and when i turned on Krick (yep) it got deeper. I was pushing a good size wake in front so when I got to an invisible 3' dip, it only added another foot.
    Bottom line is, if it had fugged my van up, I deserved it. But God protects the feebs.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by chicharronne View Post
    First off, Thanks to all for the input. I checked the filter and it was sopping wet and sucked in. it was bone dry from the filter to the intake. It cranked and ran.
    I retraced my steps and couldn't believe I got home. My main route home was probably 6' deep, so I went another route that ended up 3' deep in the beginning, and when i turned on Krick (yep) it got deeper. I was pushing a good size wake in front so when I got to an invisible 3' dip, it only added another foot.
    Bottom line is, if it had fugged my van up, I deserved it. But God protects the feebs.
    Happy to hear it ended up simple and in-expensive bro.

  9. #19
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    Mar 2012
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    I think there's a valuable lesson to be learned here. Never go straight for the tail pipe.


  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by sbx View Post
    I would imagine he could possibly get water in his intake if he was driving, splashing water around. But I would think it's more likely he just got water in his plugs, he could pull them and check, and dry out the wells if there's water in there.
    This^^^

    Pull a plug and look for signs of moisture. Running/spraying some methanol/ethanol/IPA in past the MAF sensor could dry things out, but only do it at idle in small amounts. Plugs don't like water.