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Thread: Cameras

  1. #21
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    Nikon D-200 & D-70s

    The D-200 has10 megapixels w/: AF ED Nikkor 70mm-300mm f4-5.6 zoom; AF-S Nikkor 18mm-135mm f3.5-5.6; AF Nikkor 50mm, f1.4

    The D-70 has 7.1 megapixels.

    At the moment my D-200 is my preferred body. NOTE: if you happen to have any old SLR lenses, DON'T count on them being compatible with a digital camera that you purchase. I tried using an old 27mm Nikon AI lens on my D-70 and the exposure was really screwed up, way too light and contrasty.

    Bottom line, get the most camera/ lens you can afford, and the one that will hold up the longest without repair. Once you buy into a particular system, be it Nikon or Canon or Olympus, you're pretty much stuck with that system. Also, if you can afford it, stick with the name-brand lenses. You usually get what you pay for with camera gear and off-brand lenses typically use inferior optics.

    Shop your local camera supply store so you can hold the camera and read through its manual, then buy online for the best pricing. I always use www.bhphotovideo.com in NYC. They have the biggest selection, a very competitive price, and above all else, they are TRUSTWORTHY. I've been burned too many times by Amazon.

    One other item when shopping for large lenses, (300mm+) if you think you want or need a 500mm, you might want to avoid the ''Mirror Lens'' 500mm. It's much shorter, and cheaper, but it does really odd things with interior lens refraction like horrific lens flare, especially under backlit conditions. For the East Coast, a 300mm is usually enough, especially if you have a high megapixel camera, you shoot ''fine'' quality or ''raw'' (get a large flash media card to support the large sizes of your files) and then blow them up in Photoshop. For print, 300dpi is preferred. For online, 72dpi is sufficient, in fact preferred. I always shoot 300dpi because I'm more interested in print quality than conserving file space online. Hope this helps.
    Last edited by MDSurfer; Jul 17, 2008 at 03:07 AM.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by MDSurfer View Post
    The D-200 has10 megapixels w/: AF ED Nikkor 70mm-300mm f4-5.6 zoom; AF-S Nikkor 18mm-135mm f3.5-5.6; AF Nikkor 50mm, f1.4

    The D-70 has 7.1 megapixels.

    At the moment my D-200 is my preferred body. NOTE: if you happen to have any old SLR lenses, DON'T count on them being compatible with a digital camera that you purchase. I tried using an old 27mm Nikon AI lens on my D-70 and the exposure was really screwed up, way too light and contrasty.

    Bottom line, get the most camera/ lens you can afford, and the one that will hold up the longest without repair. Once you buy into a particular system, be it Nikon or Canon or Olympus, you're pretty much stuck with that system. Also, if you can afford it, stick with the name-brand lenses. You usually get what you pay for with camera gear and off-brand lenses typically use inferior optics.

    Shop your local camera supply store so you can hold the camera and read through its manual, then buy online for the best pricing. I always use www.bhphotovideo.com in NYC. They have the biggest selection, a very competitive price, and above all else, they are TRUSTWORTHY. I've been burned too many times by Amazon.

    One other item when shopping for large lenses, (300mm+) if you think you want or need a 500mm, you might want to avoid the ''Mirror Lens'' 500mm. It's much shorter, and cheaper, but it does really odd things with interior lens refraction like horrific lens flare, especially under backlit conditions. For the East Coast, a 300mm is usually enough, especially if you have a high megapixel camera, you shoot ''fine'' quality or ''raw'' (get a large flash media card to support the large sizes of your files) and then blow them up in Photoshop. For print, 300dpi is preferred. For online, 72dpi is sufficient, in fact preferred. I always shoot 300dpi because I'm more interested in print quality than conserving file space online. Hope this helps.
    For sure. Good ideas. Definitely go to camera shop and look at and hold everything. Don't get Olympus. They are trying to make things too inter-compatible. They are making their lenses with this 4/3(or 3/4) which is compatible with them, Pentax, and some other crappier SLR companies. Anyway, Zuiko(sp?) is their lens manufacturer and I don't like them. They are light flimsy and seem cheap. Definitely Canon or Nikon if you want to take any serious pictures.

    As already stated, if you feel like you want a longer lens, see about getting a cheaper SLR model, possibly the XTi or XT because they still take quality images but will leave you plenty of cash for a nice lens or two. Just a couple thoughts.

    Before you buy anything, go to a shop and hold/play with it

  3. #23
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    since you're going with costco it's definitely safe. IF you end up shopping around on the internet make sure you read reviews about the site/shop before purchasing. I read a story on a photography forum of person ordering a lense only to have a rock in a box delivered (literally) to their door.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by beaner View Post
    since you're going with costco it's definitely safe. IF you end up shopping around on the internet make sure you read reviews about the site/shop before purchasing. I read a story on a photography forum of person ordering a lense only to have a rock in a box delivered (literally) to their door.
    Yikes!......i don't want no rock. I thought costco would be safe as well. Just glad to see others feel the same. Well, I will be posting some pics hopefully soon...

    Thanks!

  5. #25
    Costco is safe for sure but since they changed their policy on most electronices you can no longer take stuff back at anytime like previously. I beleive now you have 60 days. I would suggest buying the coverage and make sure you can return the camera at any time down the road. Cameras are worth getting protection for since they are not cheap nor cheap to fix.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Joyner View Post
    Costco is safe for sure but since they changed their policy on most electronices you can no longer take stuff back at anytime like previously. I beleive now you have 60 days. I would suggest buying the coverage and make sure you can return the camera at any time down the road. Cameras are worth getting protection for since they are not cheap nor cheap to fix.
    cool thanks for the tip

  7. #27
    if i were in your shoes, this is how i would spend my money

    canon eos 20d, used, goes for around $400
    canon 70-200 f/4L goes for a little over $500, new, the used price isn't too much below

    that will leave you with a little left over for memory cards or a bag or something, and will give you a decent starting kit for something that would suit surfing as well as other things. you can also throw in a canon eos 50mm 1.8 lens brand new for $80, always a use for those

    stay away from lenses that have a long zoom, such as a 70-300 or something. the widest aperture will be greater than something with a smaller amount of zoom, which will take away from your photos. (they won't look as good, or as sharp)

  8. #28
    I too am in the same position as you Aguaholic and i have been reading everyone's tips for camera's and was looking around and came across the Canon EOS Digital Rebel xTi. I was just wondering what people thought about that one.

  9. #29
    the canon rebels are made of the lowest of the canon line, the cheapest and farthest thing away from professional in the DSLR line

    the canon 20d is a bit higher up, and feels less like a toy and more like a camera. it has been replaced by the 30d, and then the 40d, but nothing has really changed enough to rule out the older 20d. but it has dropped the prices of them considerably, to the point where they cost the same if not less than a digital rebel.

  10. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by tbing View Post
    Nikon FTW I prefer their lenses which is why I purchased their SLR. I own a 18-55mm 55-200mm and 70-300mm all Nikkors. They are all realllly nice and fast. As for the camera, it is an entry level SLR. D40x. It has a lot of features, but not nearly top of the line.

    As for Sigma and Tamron, don't purchase those. Stick to Canon/Nikon lenses. Quality is more important than price. I can only see purchasing one of those if you want to go big say like 500mm cause it'll be like $5000 cheaper.

    Agua - 40D is the way to start. Good lens with fast FPS. Canon = top quality. Good choice
    Sigma makes an incredible product... so you are wrong there... Tamron however i agree 100%

    the 40D is an awesome camera but if you are just starting out on a digital slr and are just looking for more quality and camera options then I would say go with a Canon 30D... you can still find new ones being sold on bhphoto.com or you could even go with the new Rebel XSI... prbly the best entry level dslr to date! but you will sacrafice fps


    cheers
    -Kalen
    www.kalenfoley.com