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Thread: Cameras

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by jay cagney View Post
    the canon rebels are made of the lowest of the canon line, the cheapest and farthest thing away from professional in the DSLR line

    the canon 20d is a bit higher up, and feels less like a toy and more like a camera. it has been replaced by the 30d, and then the 40d, but nothing has really changed enough to rule out the older 20d. but it has dropped the prices of them considerably, to the point where they cost the same if not less than a digital rebel.
    you obviously have not seen the rebel XSI...

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Folzz View Post
    you obviously have not seen the rebel XSI...
    I'm no professional....but...iv'e been reading......the rebel XSI shares some features from the 40D which the XT, XTI do not. XSI from what i read IS a great camera. Great for a beginner. I went with the 40D mostly because of the FPS.

  3. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Aguaholic View Post
    I'm no professional....but...iv'e been reading......the rebel XSI shares some features from the 40D which the XT, XTI do not. XSI from what i read IS a great camera. Great for a beginner. I went with the 40D mostly because of the FPS.
    yea i just recently picked up the XSI as a back up camera and its def a solid camera.. but a great choice in the 40D... the camera is a machine... def read up on the manual cause canon does a great job explaining all the possibilities and uses for the camera...

  4. #34
    Thanks for contributing Folzz. Hope you had a blast on your 22nd bday.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Joyner View Post
    Thanks for contributing Folzz. Hope you had a blast on your 22nd bday.
    thanks man! had a pretty fun session down in OC with Phil and Stoehr right before dark and then hit up the town... mini golf is wayyyyyyy cooler when you cant really stand up straight HAH

  6. #36
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    Lens Help

    Ok...I need some lens help....I currently have a Canon 40D w/ 28mm-135mm IS USM. I am looking into getting a zoom lens. I do not know enough about lenses and what to expect out of them. I am looking into either a 75mm-300mm or a 100mm-300mm. What's the difference between the cream colored lens and the solid black one's? Also, most of these lenses have a f/stop 4.5 -5.6.....Is this bad? I really don't need IS since i take mostly tripod shots. I am looking into used because lenses are expensive and noticed that most of the used lenses are factory refurbished.

    Any suggestions? I rather shoot from the beach than halfway in the water

    Also, I'm not sure what Canon lenses will fit my camera. With all the different series. If someone can educate me on this.

    Thanks!

  7. #37
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    Ok. So I'm not sure about Canon lenses, but I think IS is image stabilization correct? Ok, well the best thing you can do is buy a faster lens (lower f number). Because then you can shoot at a quicker shutter speed because the aperture will let in more light. A faster lens will always be more productive than IS(for Canon) and VR(Vibration Reduction for Nikon). But a faster lens will run you much more money. For example, a 80-200mm f/2.8 will cost about $800-$1000, but a 70-300mm VR f/4.5-5.6 will be $500. But with the f/2.8, you could also then shoot sports indoors, or at night, which the other won't do too well.

    You have the 40D, so I think most Canon lenses should fit on it. Its not one of the base line cameras (XT, XTI) because they don't have AF in the bodies, so you would need AF in the lens. (I'm not sure about the XS or XSI, anyone know).

    If you wanna go used, see if you can pick up a used like 200mm IS f/2.8 (or lower). That'll pretty much give you the best possible shot. Fast lens + image stabilization.

    http://www.amazon.com/Canon-70-200mm...7464755&sr=1-7

    See if you can find it used, otherwise its real expensive but a top of the line lens.

  8. #38
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    Thumbs up

    What can I expect from this one?

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...5_6_EF_IS.html


    thanks!

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aguaholic View Post
    What can I expect from this one?

    http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/produc...5_6_EF_IS.html


    thanks!
    Good lens. I use a 70-300 VR which is like IS for Canon, and all my surf shots are with it. It'll be good in daylight, where you can use a fast shutter, but if you try to do any kind of night or indoors sports photography, it won't fly well.

  10. #40
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    i would keep clear of any lens w/ a min aperture larger than 4.0. While the lens above is a good beginner's lens it does limit you. 4.0-5.6 means that at 70mm the lens has a 4.0 as its widest aperture. But at 300mm the widest aperture is 5.6. this will limit you in certain lighting situations, as you will be letting in less light at 5.6 than at 4.0 or 2.8.

    With that said there are some other things to consider. Will you be using a 1.5x or 2x teleconverter in the future? If so, know that you will lose a full 1 or 2 stops respectively. So your 300mm 5.6 now becomes a 300mm f11, which may be ok but you'll see degradation in the image and you'll be unhappy with the quality (trust me, i've been there).

    With that said something else to consider is the lens's 'sweet spot.' A faster lens will be sharper at smaller aperture values (generally 2 full stops above the min value but could be higher) than a slow lens. In other words, an f/2.8 will be sharpest somewhere in the f/5.6-8 area where as a f/4-5.6 will be in the f/11 area. This will then lead to an adjustment in shutter speed (slower at a smaller f-stop so the camera can capture the appropriate light), which can then negatively impact your photos.

    Finally, IS. Get it if you plan on shooting mostly handheld and you want ultra-sharp photos (which you do). Granted the 70-300 isn't very heavy but it will help significantly as it enables you to shoot handheld at shutter speeds 2 stops slower than w/o IS. If you can't or don't want to spring for IS then purchase a monopod.


    The June 2008 issue of Outdoor Photographer talks about everything above in more detail. Or you can peruse http://www.fredmiranda.com/forum/ for more tips and insight from photographers around the world


    hope that helps.