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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    The Blue and Green
    Posts
    657
    Images
    8

    Who Lives a long way from the ocean?

    How the hell do you deal with it

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    The Blue and Green
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    657
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    8
    cuz I sure don't know how.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Delaware
    Posts
    1,087
    well, what is your distance? I am about 45 minutes without traffic

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Turtle Island
    Posts
    4,916
    Images
    6
    45 to an hour here...skate some concrete HOL, hike those hills around you...waves are the best, but there are other good things to do outside.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Marlton, New Jersey, United States
    Posts
    317
    Images
    1
    depends what beach, if I head directly east it's about a 50 minute drive to that island plus 20 mins to a decent break. Anywhere else it's over an hour. This is about as far away I'm willing to live from the coast. I've got some friends that lived west of philly before and would make that drive every time they wanted to surf, I wouldn't be able to handle that kind of drive, especially if it's waist high and mushy

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Out on the island
    Posts
    433
    I don't. I'm right there. surf more days then i don't
    I have to give you respect because i honestly don't know how you guys do it. when i lived in Richmond for a year i pretty much gave up surfing except for a couple trips to the tropics, and few road trips up and down the coast. And when i did surf i surfed like ****. i went a little stir crazy not being able to see the ocean any time i wanted. i drank barrels of bourbon and i got fat on southern cooking. i looked like a meatball in my too small wetsuits.

    when i moved back i told myself never again. Nothing against Richmond it was a hoot but i love Ocean.

  7. #7
    that's one of the things I didn't like living on the east coast. You basically have to live in or near a coast town to catch the good days...or to even stay in good enough surfing shape to be able to really perform on the good days.

    The west coast is so consistent, you can live up to a couple hrs from the beach and still get to surf several days every month. Anytime you get a chance to go to the beach, there will probably be some point in the day you can get a decent shortboard session.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
    Posts
    4,434
    Images
    26
    I don't know how I would react. On the one hand, I would like to think I could use the distance as the ultra motivation and be a dedicated machine about waking up early, driving out and surfing. But I also told my wife years ago, that if we ever moved to a place like Baltimore, DC etc. I might get so frustrated and angry about it, that I may just quit surfing. And I don't mean like, not surf as much. I am talking about taking a 2 week vacation to Hawaii and not even looking at a surf board. Like, selling off the whole quiver. I would like to think that is not what I would do. But I don't know how many 2 hours drives to get skunked it would take. Or how many epic swells that I was stuck looking at pictures of, instead of surfing.

    I know a lot of guys that make a LONG commute to surf. And I guess it just becomes a lifestyle. The norm. So, if that is what you are used to, it's no big deal. But when life catches up, and I start missing swell after swell, and it becomes so frustrating. I don't know. I would hope that I would take the high road, but I definitely could see it driving me mental.

    I have friends that lived right on the ocean, surfed with me every day for almost 10 years. Now a couple of them live in western/central MD. I ask them how often they surf. My one friend said last time he surfed was like 3 years ago in Myrtle Beach. They go to OC MD a few times each summer. Don't even paddle out. They still have boards. At first, they would drive out and surf when major swell events were happening, then over time, they got fat, stopped surfing and literally would rather golf than do any kind of physical activity. They all had high hopes and told me that they would keep surfing. None of them surf. At all anymore.

    Makes me wonder, how could you have done something, so fun, everyday for so long. Now, it means nothing to you. It's just a distant memory. It's a line you use at a bar to pick up a chick. Its nothing but the past.....

    Good on anyone who stays stoked and puts in that work. Gotta be tough.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    ethernet
    Posts
    2,599
    I gave up good steady jobs to pursue work where I could surf. I would need boatloads of women to satiate me if I didnt surf
    Last edited by MakeItStop; Aug 26, 2014 at 06:28 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
    Posts
    4,434
    Images
    26
    Quote Originally Posted by waterbaby View Post
    that's one of the things I didn't like living on the east coast. You basically have to live in or near a coast town to catch the good days...or to even stay in good enough surfing shape to be able to really perform on the good days.

    The west coast is so consistent, you can live up to a couple hrs from the beach and still get to surf several days every month. Anytime you get a chance to go to the beach, there will probably be some point in the day you can get a decent shortboard session.
    x10

    The west coast is not tide dependent. Nothing. You just grab a board and go whenever you want. Round here, I can't tell you how many days I score, albeit nothing epic, pretty fun days that are completely off the radar. Sometimes there are little bumps out there. The tide will magically start producing waist high lines out of no where. There is a lot to be said for just being there. There are so many "Flat" days that really aren't flat.

    Can't tell you how many days I actually see a wave, go grab a board and go out. When if I just looked at the cams or the forecast, or the buoys, I would have not even gone to look. I would have just moved on with the day and checked the forecast again the next day.