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Thread: waves???

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  1. #1

    waves???

    neone no when there r gunna be good waves

  2. #2
    awwww yeah! da part-eh starts SUnday yo! Swellinfo'z all over it and got us covered!

    also check out the Low on Hannah'z heelz!
    48hr Radiofax:


    96hr radiofax: (not much movement uv Hannah!?=swell for long time!)
    Last edited by kman; Aug 28, 2008 at 08:48 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    how do you read theses charts looks confusing as #^*! ..........The l is low pressure the H is high numbers in the 1001's is the barometric pressure but what is the 05 ...31...14 what is the fetch and trajectory of these storms!

  4. #4
    dBiz, wuzzup?

    i'm no meteorologist, i can only tell u what 15 yearz uv checkin' weather mapz haz taught mee...

    Low pressure systemz spin counter-clockwize, so picture the windz az they rotate around them...Low pressure systemz are usually a value anywhere under 1016mB. At 1016mB, windz are at a minimum (ie.no waves). A strong Low would be considered around 1000mB-1005mB (in winter, Lowz az strong az 988mB can be observed). Eventhough the map showz Hanna around 1012mB, i just checked the l8est, and she'z dropped down to 1003mB, which iz good...

    High pressure spinz clockwize, az do the windz circling around it. High pressurez are usually around 1020-1030mB. High pressurez do not produce surf on the east coast, unless combined with a low pressure below and to the left of it, in which case a pressure gradient iz present, like we've got goin' on in the maps shown...the windz on the bottom of the high spin in our direction, az do the windz on the top of the low...so if u combine thoze two wind directionz, they compliment one another and send us surf!

    That "05" you're tawkin' about iz really just abbreviation for 1005mB, where that "X" iz, iz where that low right below it (at 1012mB) is heading and 1005mB iz it's expected pressure once it reaches that "X"...

    The "31" is just an abbrev. for 1031mB. That's that high pressure. The "circle" with the "X" inside of it iz where the High iz, and the arrow pointing to the "23" iz where and what pressure it's forecasted to be at (time it takes to get there all dependz on if you're lookin' at the 24hr, 48hr etc forecast).

    Low pressure iz alwayz "red" and high iz "blue".

    The wind barbz around Hanna are a value of 35knts (eventhough much higher gusts can occur). each "long" barb iz worth 10knts, and the shorter one iz 5knts. so three long ones and one short one=35knts...

    that area where Hanna touches that stationary high @ 1022mB iz where the windz will come from, and they're aimin' straight @ us!

    For up-to-date wind vectorz, which come in very handy if u're unsure if swell will b comin', refer to quikscat:
    http://manati.orbit.nesdis.noaa.gov/quikscat/

    just click on the region you're interested in and u can see stronger windz are yellow, orange, black, red...lite windz blue etc...u can also zoom in and see how many barbz are shown, az mentioned above...if u see 20-30knt windz within' our vicinity and range, it's only a matter of maybe half a day before we start to see swell (time depending on how close. if they're strong windz, far away, pointing at us (ie. 40-50knts), that's when longer period swell arrivez (ie.12-13sec). SOmetimez there are gaps in the quikscat passes, where there are no windz....nuthin'z perfect, ya know?

    well, hope this helps somewhat...there'z alot uv small detailz, so i didn't (and don't know) all uv it...l8s bro.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Good looks kman you really put me on to these maps and the general movements of these high and low pressure systems. I'ma study the maps alittle more to get familiar with the symbols and color codes.

  6. #6
    it's not hard, it just takes sum experience Dbiz...

    Basically just look 4 Low pressure systemz and cold fronts...

    check the radiofax charts daily:
    http://weather.noaa.gov/fax/marsh.shtml

    under "surface charts" just click on the 24hr, 48hr, 96hr forecasts...that'll give ya a good reference az to when there will be swell...i mean, u can also uze swellinfo and other sourcez az referencez, if they say major swell comin' MOnday, and today wuz lets sayyy, Thursday, you could just uze reverse methodology and whip out the 96hr radiofax map and figure out where they think it's comin' from, ya know? or next time there'z swell, just whip out a short-term forecast map from the weather channel:
    http://www.weather.com/maps/forecastsusnational.html
    and figure out where it's comin' from, ya know? After a while, it'll become 2nd nature...

    or u cood just uze swellinfo, cuz they're accuracy rate's like, 99.9%!

    any questions, just PM mee, i'll be happy to try and help...