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  1. #1

    Dimensions vs. Size/Weight

    What shortboard dimensions do some peeps on here use who are 155-160lbs and 5"8 size, intermediate surfer? I'm trying to guage what would be too thick or too wide for my size and weight so that I can custom order the right board--thinking Bryna Wynn by the way.

    Surfline just had a great article from Rusty shaper on different boards that should be used for taller, stronger/heavier surfers. But I wanted same info. for the typical 150-170lbs surfer.

    Obviously the pros dimensions vary so much and feel like we shouldnt really copy them for your own own board since they surf so much more, different waves, and skill level.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Monmouth County
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    1,356
    can you post a link to that article?

    i'm kinda in the same boat as you. i'm 5'9 like 160ish. shooting for something like a 6'1, 2 3/8, 18 1/2

    i've been surfing smaller, thinner boards in overhead surf (6'0 18 3/16 2 1/4 and 5'11 18 2) and finding that my drops are almost always too late and i dont feel as stable as i should. that and most of the time the waves are big you're in a lot of rubber so i'm thinking a little bigger board may help
    Last edited by mOtion732; Jun 26, 2009 at 06:56 PM.

  3. #3
    Here you go: http://www.surfline.com/blog/entry.cfm?id=27888

    Yea,I think the 5"11 on a head high+ hollow day might be tough to do early drops and get you in best position. So maybe adding more volume and making it wider in the middle I think would help out.

    I think a 6"0, 18 5/16, and 2 1/4 or 2 3/8 would also change things a bit as well. Give you a bit more bouyancy and support with wider outline. Thats probably what I will get next for shortboard with a roundtail.

    But I hear you, in the winter time with the rubber and sometimes not surfing for a week or more. On the hollow days it tough and I get its practice and paddling power, shape you are in and then what board you're using.

    The 5"11 being so thin thought doesnt match up wellin my opinion in overhead surf on hollow days, maybe on mushy stuff might work out.

    This the type of convo I want to have though to see what other surfers feel works for them.

  4. #4
    One thing to remember about surfboard size is 75% of the reason to go up in volume is for catching the wave. Once you are up and riding you can be on something tiny (take skimboarding as an example). So beyond your size you have to look at your experience, paddle strength, and typical waves you want to surf it in. My theory is, the fatter you get, the harder you paddle.

    To answer exact, you fit the "standard" 6-0 18 1/4 2 1/4 thruster. A growing trend is to bump the width up to 18 1/2 18 3/4, you are most likely not going to sense the drawbacks of a wider outline, just increase your ability to catch the wave and generate speed.

  5. #5
    i like riding boards that are 20+ wide and thick but stubby....i have a board thats 5'8x22x2.5 and it catches every little wave from ankle to waist high. i found that width in the nose and tail will help get the waves a lot easier...and when its head high i bust out the 6'6...

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by SkegLegs View Post
    One thing to remember about surfboard size is 75% of the reason to go up in volume is for catching the wave. Once you are up and riding you can be on something tiny (take skimboarding as an example). So beyond your size you have to look at your experience, paddle strength, and typical waves you want to surf it in. My theory is, the fatter you get, the harder you paddle.

    To answer exact, you fit the "standard" 6-0 18 1/4 2 1/4 thruster. A growing trend is to bump the width up to 18 1/2 18 3/4, you are most likely not going to sense the drawbacks of a wider outline, just increase your ability to catch the wave and generate speed.

    Well,this winter I was riding 6"5 18 3/4 2 1/4 dan taylor DMT. Realized this was too big, but happy I got it to get used to shorter board (had fun shape 7"0). Just feel rstricted in movement, like even trying to pump or do a cutback or carve, the board loses speed quickly and I think it's because: 1) waves arent big enough for 6"5, 2) the volume is too much for someone who is 5"8 155lbs.

    Some of the bigger days kicked my *ss with the shifting currents and rips. The hollow days where it was head high+ it was really tough to drop in early. Now, it was partly due to my paddling power for sure and that pretty much made me realize I needed to be in better shape and do more cardio/core excercises so that pysically it wont be as hard on the big days. I dont surf everyday and the only way to excel on overhead days is to excercise and be ready. Thats just my opinion.

    So my projected board will be a 6"0, 18 1/2, 2 3/8. Or maybe I should just go with standard dimensions like you said 6-0 18 1/4 2 1/4. I just dont want to drop volume too much to the point where I struggle to catch waves. That's why going from 18 3/4 to 18 1/2 or 18 5/16 might work, and either keep the thickness at 2 1/4 or bump it up to 2 3/8.

    Keep in mind, I will be using the thruster for Jersey waves primarily in the winter.

  7. #7

    Dial it in...

    Just to help, I way 160-ish at 6'1" and ride a 6'3" thruster. Used to ride a 5'10" twin fin which was ok, but the longer board is definitely better.