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Thread: Piping Plovers

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Hilton Head Island - OB, SD
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    Is it really the surfers that were targetted with this? I haven't spent much time in OBX or anything, but I thought the problem was that you can ATV and OFFROAD all over the beaches there, so it was actually the activities "on the beach" rather than in the water that brought on the neac bans... Either way, I understand that locals and natives of OBX are losing some of their rights on the beach, but I didn't really feel offended as a surfer by this topic. I figured surfers of all people would be the most understanding of a stable ecosystem...

    Dunno, just my two cents. But I don't live there, so I'm just an outsider looking in.

    The stupid local government here just decided to kick all of the natural seals out of the La Jolla children's cover because the rich people of La Jolla feel that their grandkids own that beach and that they should be allowed access to it without wild seals bathing in the sun...

    After years of diliberation, they finally agreed to it... Now, the STUPID san diego city government is playing freaking DOG BARKING SOUNDS OUT OF LOUD Speakers all night to try and get the seals to move to a new home,..

    Here is a better ideal, you fu**ing rich f*ckers in la Jolla. How about you take your kids to one of the thousand other beaches along the 80 PLUS MILES STRETCH OF SAN DIEGO COASTLINE!!!!

    I feel that the La Jolla thing is the exact opposite of the OBX birds... Its like if OBX was like "Fu** the birds, we are going to drive Hummers all over the beaches all night and get these damn birds outta here!

  2. #12
    esp since the birds are still declining in number even after the beach closings, the fox trapping. there is something called natural selection and it is hard at work on these birds. let them die off or keep some specimens in the zoo.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by chrisd View Post
    esp since the birds are still declining in number even after the beach closings, the fox trapping. there is something called natural selection and it is hard at work on these birds. let them die off or keep some specimens in the zoo.
    good point. there has to be a time where they realize the conservation efforts are either working or failing. if they're failing, then there's nothing they can do, and they should return things to the way they were.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    jersey
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    76
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    im pretty sure the closing has no effect to surfers anyway since the beach is closed not the water...

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    In a state of flux
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    3,305
    actaully it does since you need to cross the beach to get to the water. we had a similar issue up in s jerz where you can surf all you want but its a 3 mile paddle to get to the jetty where the waves break usually against a decent south current.

  6. #16

    Habitat for all God's little critters

    Stop *****ing, would you rather see hotels and yuppies with their larva all over the beach? Think about the big picture. Why do we want to protect beaches and water quality?

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    453
    You cannot walk or drive on the beach where they have closures for piping plover. And the closures are basically everywhere that there isn't a town. Say a sandbar between Buxton and Avon was just firing, I wouldn't be able to surf it, because the beach is closed for plovers, and I would have to cross the beach to get there.

    Just the other day I was surfing in frisco, and I could see the hook just reeling 6 foot lefts all the way from the top of the point to the inside. Now usually I would have High Tailed it down there on the sand, however because of piping plover closures I couldn't.

    So Tell me how this does not effect surfers???


    P.S. I would just like to add that these piping plover, are not even a native species, they were introduced. So if anything, getting rid of the plover may actually help the local ecosystem.
    Last edited by BonerSurfs; Aug 3, 2009 at 03:38 PM.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Virginia Beach
    Posts
    453
    Sorry to sound like a **** right here, But will you all just please talking about the OBX like you know whats up... I'm on this site all the time reading bogus info, or just straight B.S. about the OBX. For real guys, If you don't live there, or don't surf there on a regular basis, just stop talking about it, because 99% of the stuff i read about it on here is just totally bogus. I'll put it to you frankly, If you don't know what the deal is with the piping plover, then you obviously have no clue about anything down there, and therefore should not put in your 2 cents, because your most likely wrong!!!

    Ok sorry, just had to get it off my chest...

  9. #19
    I dont know but I was actually refering the assateague island because we have the piping plover problem with closures and all. It affects local surf fishermen. So stop being a d bag. Sorry just had to get it off my chest.

  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by BonerSurfs View Post
    P.S. I would just like to add that these piping plover, are not even a native species, they were introduced. So if anything, getting rid of the plover may actually help the local ecosystem.
    actually, the Outer Banks is one of the plover's natural breeding grounds. that's why it's such a big deal. they may not live there year round, but during breeding season, they migrate to coastal regions (OBX, delmarva, etc.). and that's not something that just started happening, it's part of their natural life cycle as a species.