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Thread: Beach Pumping

  1. #21
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    The sand pumping has been a problem for NJ even prior to the replenishment in Long Branch. Sea Bright used to have some great spots and once they pumped sand, they never broke right again. I think they could have come up with an alternative; not only did it ruin the surf but it also killed marine life and created some heavy rip tides.

    I know that making the beaches bigger leads to more tourists, which in turn is more money for the town..... But this is getting out of control. When they first pumped the sand on to the beach in Sea Bright you would walk in to the water and it would be an immediate drop off. I was a lifeguard in Sea Bright for 6 years and it seemed we had more problems when they "dredged" the beaches due to the rip tides and sand collapsing under peoples feet. It looks like they have modified their technique since then, now they pump in one spot and let the sand naturally distribute the beaches to the north (cause thats the way the current flows). Great idea, but still didn't do anything for us!!! With all the money they spend on beach replenishment, you would think they could spend some money to think of a better plan!

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by aka pumpmaster View Post
    Just found out that they are doing sand pumping in N Wildwood (my home break) starting on the 18th. From past experience in OCMD that killed the breaks down there. Anybody else in jerz recently go through this and did it help or hurt your spots?
    Hey, Ive been surfing for 11 years, and im only 16 years old. i live around sea bright nj and thats where i wish i could surf. 8 years ago, i would be able to surf there, but since they pumbed the beach we have lost all our jettis and even on the biggest days, the waves are still only breaking out 5 or 10 feet. on a sucking up shore break, which is impossible to ride. Now everytime i go surfing, i have to ride my bike to long branch with a surfboard in my hand to go surfing. its a 11 mile ride for me which takes about an hour and a half. Im comepletely against beach pumping and hopefully they never do it again!

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mOtion732 View Post
    why not some artificial reefs?
    There seems to be some permitting issues as to the type/orientation of structure that could be used as per the rules and regs dealing with the subtidal areas.
    And then there is liability issues involved, that the municipalities, feds., and state are not readily volunteering themselves for; for a good reason, since everyone is ready to sue. If people are going to sue because they dropped in on a close out in the shorebreak that they shouldn't have been on and whacked their head, then they are going to sue if they wiped out on the reef and whacked their head.

    If it is going to be done, I am betting that consideration needs to be taken to ensure that the reef isn't going to increase the waves to a point that it increases erosion and makes the 'neighbors' situation worse....Kinda defeats the purpose of the shore protection.. And based on recent findings (failures due to materials/wave climate/etc.), I also think that there is some skepticism as to the fact that they really work and/or will last...I guess it depends on the specific environment and wave climate, etc. The jury still seems to be out on that..

  4. #24

    NEver

    This is my first post, I felt compelled to write since this is a subject I am very passionate about.

    Sandy Hook, Long Branch, North Monmouth County...

    These are all examples of how beach replenishment has had a negative effect on the overall beach quality for the benefit of those few individuals who decided to build to close to the ocean (really bright!)

    I have been surfing for 18 years and Sandy Hook could not be compared to. By far, it was when of the best places to be when there was swell. After the replenishment, the 200 yards of sand has done nothing but protect the grass that grows there. What a waste of funds, I agree that some of the money should go towards research and development of alternatives-something that is always discussed but never acted upon.

    Here are some before and after pictures of the Hook...
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Gumbya55; Sep 10, 2009 at 03:28 AM.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gumbya55 View Post
    Here are some before and after pictures of the Hook...
    Where'd the pics go?...they we good shots..

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lumpy View Post
    Where'd the pics go?...they we good shots..
    Ooops..they're back...

  7. #27
    One of the issues is that the effect of pumping on surf breaks and bottom contours is temporary - temporary in a geological context. If unmodified again - it will go back to the way it was, but over a period of many years. We live on a human time scale - so about the time that Mother Nature has rearranged the sand closer to original specs, and the surf starts breaking again - along comes the pumping and the breaks are destroyed again. The result is that along any coastline that receives periodic pumping - most of the time the beaches are in "recovery" mode and not breaking properly.

    One very real issue that I have noted for Delmarva surfers has been the crowding that has occurred in the past few years at the few remaining/recovered spots that are still breaking - particularly in the DE portion of this coast.

  8. #28
    Cape may has suffered as well from beach replenishment.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by pmoos View Post
    One of the issues is that the effect of pumping on surf breaks and bottom contours is temporary - temporary in a geological context. If unmodified again - it will go back to the way it was, but over a period of many years. We live on a human time scale - so about the time that Mother Nature has rearranged the sand closer to original specs, and the surf starts breaking again - along comes the pumping and the breaks are destroyed again. The result is that along any coastline that receives periodic pumping - most of the time the beaches are in "recovery" mode and not breaking properly.

    One very real issue that I have noted for Delmarva surfers has been the crowding that has occurred in the past few years at the few remaining/recovered spots that are still breaking - particularly in the DE portion of this coast.
    I agree, I can remember maybe around 3 years ago I could find a handful of spots that would have a handful of people, and about 5 years ago you could surf crickets with a couple others on some of the best swells.

  10. #30
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    Hey those are my Sandy Hook pics ! LBNJ Local, remember some of those breaks going right into the seawall in Seabright? Remember the Ship Ahoy Jetty? Great fishing although I never looked there on a swell. There were a ton of great spots with no parking so you had to park and walk to get to them. Lots of great spots with no beach, no beach goers and no crowds. I had a lot of people yell at me over the years because I parked in front of their house.