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  1. #1

    Bodyboarding at Pipeline?

    How do the Bodyboarders paddle out there with only a bodyboard? they have like no paddle power (not that much even with fins). Im not tryin to start a war, im jw because i tried paddling out in like 12 foot surf and couldnt do it at all.

  2. #2
    you can walk out over the reef its easy as **** to get out but chuck the bodyboard tryin to paddle out threw sets of 6-10 waves at 10-15ft on a bodyboard is damn near impossible im buying a surfboard after trying it my damn self

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by ferrari4756 View Post
    How do the Bodyboarders paddle out there with only a bodyboard? they have like no paddle power (not that much even with fins). Im not tryin to start a war, im jw because i tried paddling out in like 12 foot surf and couldnt do it at all.
    yeah i just paddled out in 8-12 ft surf on my bodyboard on saturday. when those big sets start pounding on you, thats when you just have to dive under. but that is only with waves 7-8 ft. or bigger. then when there is any lull whatsoever, then you have to paddle your a$$ off

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    I usually start paddling when the sets are breaking.... By the time the lull kicks in, I'm already near the impact zone..... then I just paddle my ass off till I make it past the breakers. If its really big 10-15ft you have to have the duckdive mastered. And you need to know how to duckdive into the face of the wave without getting pitched. In other words practice practice practice!!!!!!

  5. #5
    Watch some real footage of Pipeline or Sunset instead of drooling over Surfing Mag board logo close-up pics The channel rip at Pipeline zoots you out in seconds. The challenge is being in position in the line-up and not getting whacked or clobbered when you are shoulder to shoulder in well overhead surf.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Seattle, WA
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    485
    Quote Originally Posted by rodndtube View Post
    Watch some real footage of Pipeline or Sunset instead of drooling over Surfing Mag board logo close-up pics The channel rip at Pipeline zoots you out in seconds. The challenge is being in position in the line-up and not getting whacked or clobbered when you are shoulder to shoulder in well overhead surf.
    Ditto. It's so easy to get in over your head on the north shore because the paddle out at a lot of the spots isn't all that bad. I remember the first time I surfed Logs. Got lucky and timed it PERFECT, in the lineup with dry hair. I then realized it was WAY scarier than I had imagined, sat there peeing myself for a solid hour until I finally just went for it and got the best wave of my life.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by rodndtube View Post
    Watch some real footage of Pipeline or Sunset instead of drooling over Surfing Mag board logo close-up pics The channel rip at Pipeline zoots you out in seconds. The challenge is being in position in the line-up and not getting whacked or clobbered when you are shoulder to shoulder in well overhead surf.
    Got a youtube clip of the paddle out by any chance? I'd like to see it.

  8. #8
    Search "YouTube" for Pipeline footage. Maybe you'll find some clips.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by rodndtube View Post
    Search "YouTube" for Pipeline footage. Maybe you'll find some clips.
    There's like a million video's of pipe on youtube and I haven't seen one yet showing a full paddle out.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeb2056 View Post
    There's like a million video's of pipe on youtube and I haven't seen one yet showing a full paddle out.
    If you have this many questions and can't figure it out then you are not ready. As the other chap noted above in this thread, paddling out is one thing, positioning and riding a wave without getting clobbered, smacked around good, or worse, is another thing. Few people seriously think about the currents and an exit strategy if things don't go according to plan. When surfing reef breaks, pocket coves, headlands, etc., you are best to be prepared - it is a different ballgame than riding beach breaks and sandbars along a relatively straight coast.