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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    In a state of flux
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwj72 View Post
    I'm glad to see that people are at least questioning this and debating it instead of just accepting the "enviro-emergency" that some may be trying to portray. I think you need to be informed to have a solid opinion, regardless of which side you fall on. As far as which is better, I'm sure there are land ecosystems that a land based solution could affect as well. I think Surfrider sometimes does themselves a disservice by jumping on the ocean eco side of every issue without actually comparing the impacts on other aspects of life (offshore drilling is a good example of this). The bottom line is, this stuff has to go somewhere unless someone knows how to stop producing it. I obviously don't as my post here shows.
    Wow!! Talk about a level headed reply. Not saying this isn't a good cause but too many times Surfrider cries 'the sky is falling' in order to pump up representation at meetings or their coffers. An unfortunate side affect of this is that when they do it too many times, people stop listening.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Lewes, DE
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    Lets not question that Surfrider is a great service to us... And, the fact that they are investigating this is good. But, like others have said, we need all the data, and both sides of the story to form opinions ourselves.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Monmouth County
    Posts
    1,184
    I haven't been to a Surfrider meeting in a few months now because I have to work on Saturday now but let me tell you when I went to my first meeting I was blown away of how much knowlege they had and how aggresive they really are.Although you may not agree on everything they do I believe they do have good intentions.Im glad that they are there.We all love to surf so check out your chapters and get involved.At least go to 1 meeting and if its not for you at least you tried.

  4. #34
    I hope that everyone can look into this further than what people post on this forum. You may take this forum and form your own opinion for either land application or sewer discharge into the ocean. Surfrider is not here to swing you one way or the other. We're just here to bring it to your attention. We like to think about the future and our generations to come. I would like to think that my kids are going to be in the ocean just as much as myself if not more. I want to do all that I can now to prevent bad water quality in the future. Coming from a die hard surfer and a life long fisherman I love the water and everything it has to offer. I hope that you all enjoy it just as much as myself and my family. Lets not let this thread get out of control. Any useful information will help all of us out. Thanks to most of the posts for providing some of that.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    If you want credibility then stop posting misleading comments and images about the issue. had you posted the FACTS and links so people can research, the response probably been better. those of us that have been our for awhile have seen enough of surfriders hysteria to be cautious but still probably would have at least done some research.

    I said it before...the more you cry the sky is falling, the less people will listen.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    milton delaware
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swellinfo View Post
    Lets not question that Surfrider is a great service to us... And, the fact that they are investigating this is good. But, like others have said, we need all the data, and both sides of the story to form opinions ourselves.
    Good point. the Delaware chapter successfully got the City of Rehoboth to designate a surfing beach (back when it was breaking), fought a long battle to preserve another surf break that was threatened, several each clean-ups each year, purchased signs urging people to stop trampling sand dunes where it was really getting out of control and doing damage, volunteer water testing and reporting...the list goes on and on.

    They have been there when we needed them on a lot of issues.

  7. #37
    Here is what Suzanne Thurman, Executive Director of the Marine Education Research and Rehabilitation Institue in Lewes, has to say:

    The Marine Education, Research & Rehabilitation Institute would like to comment on the proposal to install an outfall pipe off of Rehoboth Beach as a means of waste water management. As the organization responsible for the welfare of marine mammals and sea turtles throughout our state, we are particularly concerned about the negative impact an outfall pipe could have on the health of our oceans, the species who reside there, and on our citizens.

    Many endangered marine species occur along our coast, and in our bays and inland waterways. Delaware waters serve as an important foraging ground and migratory pathway for whales, dolphins, seals, manatees and sea turtles, all of which are protected species under Federal law. These animals face perils of many origins including environmental toxins resulting from waste water treatment, marine debris, oil spills, boat strike, fisheries interactions, and more.

    As much as we may enjoy communing and recreating with the ocean, marine species must rely on them for every aspect of their existence. The waters in which they live,
    and the food that they eat show high levels of environmental toxins, human in origin. Toxicological studies of dolphins in the last few years are beginning to correlate bioaccumulations of toxins and pharmaceuticals with exposure to marine pollution (man-made) and harmful algal blooms, specifically brevetoxins.

    Recent and ongoing studies of Atlantic Bottlenose Dolphin populations provide evidence linking environmental toxins found in the tissues of these animals, such as PCBs, mercury, DDT and organic compounds such as water repellants (PFCs) and flame retardants (PBCEs), to infections, cancers, lymphatic disorders, and immune system suppressions. Additionally, dolphins exposed to antibiotics in coastal waters from municipal outfall pipes (pharmaceuticals are unable to be broken down by traditional wastewater facilities) are growing new strains of problematic bacteria. A study by the National Ocean Service Center for Coastal Environmental Health and Biomolecular Research at Fort Johnson, South Carolina found antibiotic-resistant bacteria near waste water treatment plants. Researchers at Fort Johnson found evidence that local dolphin populations contained this bacteria. This syndrome will impact their ability to respond to veterinary treatment if needed, and may suppress their immune system, thus opening wild populations of marine mammals to a myriad of disease.

    Marine mammals serve as important barometers for the health of our oceans, acting as sentinels for the presence of toxins that may also impact human swimmers and beachgoers. In localities where both dolphins and human diseases have been contrasted and compared i.e. in North America (Alaska, Puget Sound, San Francisco Bay, Gulf Coast, Florida and the St. Lawrence Seaway) evidence has preliminarily linked fish source contamination and increased risk of human myeloma. Studies are continuing to evaluate the relationships of the health of the marine environments, genetic predispositions and calculations for risks of developing myelomas for dolphins and humans alike.

    For you, the leaders and planners for the community of Rehoboth Beach, it must certainly be a difficult task to make decisions that are in the best interest of all facets of the community. We live in a thriving community that sources itís livelihood from the ocean, whether it be through tourism, commerce, real estate, fishing, or personal enjoyment. Many of us choose to make our lives here, out of our affinity for our beautiful coast. As a community that relies so heavily on the enduring presence of these great ecosystems, it is imperative that we make decisions with an eye to the future, and identify ocean health as an essential factor in all of our futures. Difficult choices must be made, and while none seem to be the perfect answer, we hope that our community leaders show the prudence to act as good stewards of our coastal areas by making decisions that help us to conserve and preserve our precious resources, and our way of life.



    Sincerely,
    Suzanne Thurman
    Executive Director
    Marine Education, Research & Rehabilitation Institute
    Lewes, DE

  8. #38

    Here's another article in the Cape Gazette regarding the issue to keep all informed.
    http://www.capegazette.com/storiescu...o-sewer13.html

    another great link is www.arcatamarshfriends.org
    It's an example that there are other alternatives out there.

    thank you.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Ocean City, MD
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    Fyi

    For all those dreading the pending sewerage outfall pipe proposed for Rehoboth: Ocean City's goes out 2 miles right at 46th street and has been pumping effluent out that way for the past 20 years at least. I guess that's why so many people surf 46th street. How do I know this? Every so often divers can be seen going down the manhole cover at the end of the street. Their job is to inspect the continuity of the pipe to insure no near-shore leakages.

    And more food for thought. . . 9000 feet is just shy of 2 miles, but then it is Delaware. Did you ever give any thought to the fact that Philly is a whopper of a city and it sits just upstream from Rehoboth, eh? Where does their effluent go? Not to mention what DuPont is doing. Which begs the question, why did they name it Delaware instead of "DuPont?"

    I'd much rather risk Maryland, thank you very much.
    Last edited by MDSurfer; Nov 15, 2009 at 01:34 PM.

  10. #40
    Quote Originally Posted by MDSurfer View Post
    For all those dreading the pending sewerage outfall pipe proposed for Rehoboth: Ocean City's goes out 2 miles right at 46th street and has been pumping effluent out that way for the past 20 years at least. I guess that's why so many people surf 46th street. How do I know this? Every so often divers can be seen going down the manhole cover at the end of the street. Their job is to inspect the continuity of the pipe to insure no near-shore leakages.

    And more food for thought. . . 9000 feet is just shy of 2 miles, but then it is Delaware. Did you ever give any thought to the fact that Philly is a whopper of a city and it sits just upstream from Rehoboth, eh? Where does their effluent go? Not to mention what DuPont is doing. Which begs the question, why did they name it Delaware instead of "DuPont?"

    I'd much rather risk Maryland, thank you very much.
    That is a FACT yes, that there are currently pipes all over the world....but why pour salt on the wound if we have the technology and the brains to start solving the problems on town at a time? If everyone continues to have the attitude of, "well, it's happening over there...so why not do it here?" then we will continue to ruin our environment. The ocean and all waterways belongs to everyone, and we should all think about that long and hard. You can't just always have the attitude that "it's not in my backyard" when it comes to water, because in the end, IT REALLY IS in your backyard.