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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,306
    Quote Originally Posted by Franyfingers View Post
    you use to much resin.
    If you're talking about waste, yea... there's always a couple of foamy oz left in the bucket. If you're talking about too much resin in the lam, no. My laminations are tight and flat, with no dry spots or puddles. Every time.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Franyfingers View Post
    you use to much resin.
    Agree with LB Crew on this one. 12 oz mixed material for a single 4 oz epoxy lam is not too much, nor is 15 oz for the double-4 top. (Assuming a 6ft shortboard or fish). ESPECIALLY for a beginner. LB Crew is a very experienced glasser (I think) and you should use at least 10-20% more than him if you are new to laminating epoxy. Hot coats you can be closer to LB Crew's numbers, but be generous with lams.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    1,286
    All true, nothing worse than wetting out the flats and finding there is not enough to soak the laps. Having extra is better than having to rush a mix to complete the job before it goes tacky although that rarely happens with Resin Research.

  4. #14
    Do you guys wet out the laps with a squeegee, like with poly resin, or something else? I read somewhere that you can paint the rails with RR then fold the laps down. I'm really comfortable working with the poly but if there is a better way with RR I'll try it. Also, how much Additive F will I need for one board either 5'6" or 7'10?
    Thanks.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Monmouth Beach, NJ
    Posts
    2,306
    You heard right... You can cut your cloth, fold up the lap, and paint the rail, from the apex down and around to where your lap edge will be. Don't go above the apex, or you you can have problems with the cloth bunching up. Then fold back down your cloth, pour out the resin, and start spreading. Spread it all out on the flats, let it soak in, then start to pull, lapping the dry cloth onto the wet rail. The extra step can help minimize waste.

    Use the volumes above to figure how much Add F you'll need, but everybody sells it in quantity. So get a bottle, and use as needed, but a couple oz. of the stuff is plenty for one board.
    Last edited by LBCrew; Feb 21, 2010 at 09:43 PM.

  6. #16
    Did you have any problems with the color going into the white when you were sanding it? I've used carbon fiber on the rails for a stringerless board, and for some reason when I'm sanding the line between cf and the main part of the board, it kind of bleeds over. It is totally dry, but still gets "in" the white area.

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by LBCrew View Post
    You heard right... You can cut your cloth, fold up the lap, and paint the rail, from the apex down and around to where your lap edge will be. Don't go above the apex, or you you can have problems with the cloth bunching up. Then fold back down your cloth, pour out the resin, and start spreading. Spread it all out on the flats, let it soak in, then start to pull, lapping the dry cloth onto the wet rail. The extra step can help minimize waste.

    Use the volumes above to figure how much Add F you'll need, but everybody sells it in quantity. So get a bottle, and use as needed, but a couple oz. of the stuff is plenty for one board.
    Thanks LBCrew!