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Thread: Board Size?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    wilmington N.C.
    Posts
    1
    I'm about your height and weight and finding the right board can be fustrating.There is nothing wrong with having a longboard in your quiver, they offer superior glide and catch waves with ease. If your looking for a board that turns on a dime and catches waves fairly easy there is nothing better than a fun board... PERIOD. Surfing close to 40 years on the east coast this is the best design that allows progressive manuvers while maintaining high wave count per session. If you dislike noseriding like I do Look for a board around 7'4"-7"8" in length, 21 1/2" wide and 2 3/4" thick. Other benifits... easier to store,tote and fit in or on your vehicle. Fun boards cost less than logs too. Get out there and bury the rail and throw the tail! RJB

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    rincon ,puerto rico
    Posts
    54
    Quote Originally Posted by caseyc735 View Post
    Little help...I am ready to buy a board, need a little recommendation. 6-2, 200lbs, surfed a few times on a long board, but want something that will be versatile. It will be used mainly eastcoast, I'm a beginner, BUT want something that will progress/grow w/ me (i snowboard/skate/ride everthing...) and I am a quick study. Thanks in advance for any advice. Casey

    try a 7'6 NSP my neighbor has 1 it is indestructible and you can still do some turns on it. Or just cruise down the line on it.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    WB: C-street and Mase and Sweetwater and all sorts of chill places around WB. Its rad.
    Posts
    559
    Quote Originally Posted by RJBsurfs View Post
    I'm about your height and weight and finding the right board can be fustrating.There is nothing wrong with having a longboard in your quiver, they offer superior glide and catch waves with ease. If your looking for a board that turns on a dime and catches waves fairly easy there is nothing better than a fun board... PERIOD. Surfing close to 40 years on the east coast this is the best design that allows progressive manuvers while maintaining high wave count per session. If you dislike noseriding like I do Look for a board around 7'4"-7"8" in length, 21 1/2" wide and 2 3/4" thick. Other benifits... easier to store,tote and fit in or on your vehicle. Fun boards cost less than logs too. Get out there and bury the rail and throw the tail! RJB
    How can you dislike noseriding?

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Maryland and New Jersey
    Posts
    123
    I'm 6 3 160 and I ride a 6 6 squash, 6 7 fish, and a 6 10 fish. Hope this helps, not sure if the location matters, never surfed outside Jersey.

  5. #15

    what about the old and slow?

    i've been looking for answers to this for a while now.i'm 6ft 185 and getting older all the time.i currently ride an 8 ft fun board but it seems too much to handle and bottom turn on these vertical drop waves we have around here.i had a 6.4 fish that was too small and thin and i swear if i caught the wave i couldn't find the board under me.tried for a summer and a half and never rode that thing.i keep thinking i need around 7 feet and thick enough to float.i remember in the late 80's the waves would roll in and i could catch it ,pick my moment and drop right in.even chest to head high.now,they break so hard and fast you gotta go NOW.the fun board aint that fun in these conditions.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by analogsurfer View Post
    i've been looking for answers to this for a while now.i'm 6ft 185 and getting older all the time.i currently ride an 8 ft fun board but it seems too much to handle and bottom turn on these vertical drop waves we have around here.i had a 6.4 fish that was too small and thin and i swear if i caught the wave i couldn't find the board under me.tried for a summer and a half and never rode that thing.i keep thinking i need around 7 feet and thick enough to float.i remember in the late 80's the waves would roll in and i could catch it ,pick my moment and drop right in.even chest to head high.now,they break so hard and fast you gotta go NOW.the fun board aint that fun in these conditions.
    I think your best bet would be in the 6'6 to 7'2 range if you're looking for more maneuverability, yet something that will hold in bigger/steeper waves and still have a lot of float. Based on the first and last requirements, a fish would be the way to go, but the low entry rocker might not help late drops in more sizable surf. Gary Wilson's Kingfish is a good model that combines the desirable aspects of a fish (more maneuverable and with more volume) with some improvements such as a more pulled in tail and a less curvy outline with more entry rocker than a standard fish, that will help it still preform in larger, faster breaking surf.

  7. #17
    i think your right 58845.these boards you posted look good.is that wood veneer on the middle one?maybe faux marbleing .you have a quote on the bottom that i can't ignore.when a nation attacks the prosperous it can't last too long either.i used to make a good living building things for the prosperous. now i'm on foodstamps and looking at surfboards i can't buy.

  8. #18
    Many people that were spending money like crazy weren't prosperous in the first place. Most of them have huge lines of credit card bills stacked up unpaid. The bad economy hit everyone but there are plenty the screwed themselves with debt that is now near impossible to recover from. OR didn't properly SAVE well when they actually WERE MAKING MONEY. I have to work 2 jobs to pay the bills now because hours are at a all time low in demand. Stop feeling sad for yourself and placing blame, There are plenty of jobs out there to keep you off the food stamps that all the job holding people and I are paying for. Great job, we just hijacked this thread.

    I'm sorry and correct me if I'm wrong...but I'm assuming you are one of the many house builders that built in the housing hay days, and most likely paid a pile of illegals(that didn't pay taxes) to do all the work. Now that market is bust you are screwed, and unable to roll up the sleeves and put in actual work yourself but rather take a check from the Gov.

  9. #19
    well no, i built furniture and cabinets for those people who spent all that money they probably couldn't afford.no illegals just me and my boss and not anymore.something will come up and i hate the foodstamps. temporary situation.just having a hard time feeding the family on the 10 an hour thats all i could find.rather talk surfing any time.hmmm, maybe less attention on waves and more thought for the future way back when,....nah.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Crystal Coast,N.C.
    Posts
    399
    Images
    24
    Quote Originally Posted by 58845 View Post
    I think your best bet would be in the 6'6 to 7'2 range if you're looking for more maneuverability, yet something that will hold in bigger/steeper waves and still have a lot of float. Based on the first and last requirements, a fish would be the way to go, but the low entry rocker might not help late drops in more sizable surf. Gary Wilson's Kingfish is a good model that combines the desirable aspects of a fish (more maneuverable and with more volume) with some improvements such as a more pulled in tail and a less curvy outline with more entry rocker than a standard fish, that will help it still preform in larger, faster breaking surf.


    58845 has the right shape and size for you just buy what you can afford.... Customs are the best bet and you can get one for the same if not cheaper than a shop and the shaper can help you out with technicals and dimensions.