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  1. #1
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    Nov 2009
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    Death of the Modern Shortboard?

    How many of you feel as though the shortboard thrusters of the 90s and 00s will eventually be replaced by wider, shorter, and more blunt nosed boards like the Rusty Flying Disc, Al Merrick Gravy and Almond Kookumber?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    They already have in my quiver. Being a big guy I always hated those paper thin narrow boards. I would think that anyone who is skilled could ride a short wide round nosed board as well as a chip and have an easier time doing it.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Salisbury
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    229
    it's a heck of a lot easier to turn a big board than it is to paddle a little one. I think there will still be a place in surfing for the hi-performance board--for small guys who are lighnting quick and have the reflexes and desire to ride hi-performance boards. But surfers and board makers (and board sellers) have gotten real and figured out that the majority of us guys aren't banging airs or fins-free slides, etc., and we need boards that paddle nicely, catch waves easily, and hold up for a longer time.

    Of course there will always be the guys who think they need a pro board, but will never be able to surf it well. I love sitting in the line up near a 200 pounder on a 6-0 chip, snagging every wave he misses with my 7-8 retro singlefin.

  4. #4
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    May 2009
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    To each their own, but I'm with Zippy. The "regular" shortboard doesn't fit my style, so I don't buy/ride them.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Internationally, no... Where there are good waves, there will be shortboard thrusters... I agree that wider, shorter, thicker boards are super fun on a summer day in OC... But down in the Banks when its OH+, you wont see much other than thrusters.... Where I surf, guys ride fishes and stuff on the off days, but when its firing, everything in the lineup looks the same. Fast, thin shortboards.... So, until all the local pros and up and comers start riding other materials, I dont see them going anywhere...

    For the everyday surfer, yes, the boards you speak of are fun, but for guys who are out every day trying to compete and surf their best "high performance" boards, they will be riding thrusters for a while.... There is a reason that EVER guy on the CT and QS are all riding thrusters...

    I know one of you guys just made the valid point about how most surfers arent pros and ride the wrong boards, but I dont compete anymore since I am 29, but I ONLY ride boards that are designed for the pros. They just perform better. I dont get the super thin potato chips anymore but the high performace thrusters turn bettter, glide better, get more speed, get more ait and turn on a dime... Other than an easy paddle in and more foam, I dont see any positive reason to ride those other boards unless its knee high. Thats just me though.

  6. #6
    I agree. I think it's happening slowly but surely. Probably will always be a place for the 6'0" by 18 3/8 thruster but it will become limited to competitive light-weights and wannabes.

    I bet if you ask Channel Islands or any of the other big guys they will tell you that the shorter/wider boards are growing in demand and the chips are shrinking. There product lines reflect that. Look at the Lost line, so many variations of a short/wide board now on offer. Even the step-ups are going this way (Rock Up, Slayer, Deep 6, etc.)

    I think this is particularly welcome trend for bigger guys... Shorter/wider fits better and surfs better than than longer/thicker.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    I have always been an alternative shape, twin keel surfer but have recently started riding a T Patterson Rising Sun and after a month or so of use cannot see a downside to the thruster set up and shape template. I was very worried that the center fin would slow the board down but it seems faster to me and much more responsive. I can stay high in the speed zone of the wave as opposed to that wandering speed of the keels. The shape of the rising sun is full and it is relatively thick so I guess it can't be considered a typical high performance board but it combines the best of both worlds in one shape.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    considering that windsurfing and skiing has taken the move to go shorter and wider over ten years ago, surfing is a bit behind, no? The styles have been around, but the marketing hasn't been there, along with the surfing community to believe in them. experimentation of pro surfers using them could only be seen by free surfing vids, which could barely make an impact on the overall scene. Even today we are still in awe and curious (at least I am) when we see a pro ripping on an 60/40 egg in overhead Bali.

  9. #9
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    Yeah, I agree that many more shapers and companies are pushing the wider, shorter, thicker boards... But more than anything else, I think that it just goes to show how much the surfing population has expanded in the past decade or two. I think that generally, more people are surfing and buying surf boards, and I think that we all know, that for the masses and for the weekend surfer or the summer guy, most people are not very good. Surfing is really hard, so yes, I agree that we will continue to see more of these boards, I am just saying that it might take a while for them to break into the high performance markets... Lost Surfboards is a huge company, but they are stationed out of Newport beach, and most of the year, Newport isnt exacly DOH and firing, which is why the boards are really popular... I love taking out a short, wide board on a mushy, smaller day or even on a slower reef break, but on any good day, I don't see much use for them...

    They don't turn as well, thicker foam slides out when I do sharp angled turns, then don't hit the flats very well for me and allow a change of direction with real power, and the sluggish horizontal top turns that wider boards promote is poop to me. When you are pumping down the line on those little wide boards, when you either lay one down and bury the rail trying to hack a turn, it just slides out. Its ugly and doesn't feel right to me... Too much foam and weight doesn't allow the rails to cut through the wave like butter. All though they have a nice feel if you are "cruising" and just playing around, but if its 4-5 feet and glassy at my beach break, I would never take out some wide little fat hybrid fish. They are slow and meaty and dont allow very structured, good looking turns... You gotta stay too lvertical over the center of the board because its un-responsive. It you lay out or lean too much the thing craps out. Thats my opinion... Maybe I just dont ride them enough to dial them in, but in my experiences, those boards are only good for a sh**y summer day....

    Every board has its place. Longboards, shortboards, fish, eggs etc. They all work well in the right conditions.

  10. #10
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    Jan 2009
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    Seems to me the shorter wider trend in surfboards started in the late 90s. The ...Lost RNF and CI Flyer became huge sellers around that time. Then it went to another level about 5 years ago when everyone decided all at once that you needed KG fishes and Walden CDs to tame the summer waves and ride a 6 foot board with winter rubber. But i agree...the marketing of short wide eggs and fish shapes has kind of gone crazy in the last year to the point where it seems like over half of CI, Rusty, ...Lost etc models are fish/mini egg shapes.